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BOONE COU1NTY RECORDER 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January 4, iw ft */£/ ~ ) 



v<**' 



.-<vt> 




PFC. WILLI 
KILLED IN 




THREE BOONE Ot 
REPORTED WOI 
SERVING 
FORCES. 



PIC. W! 
Mr. and Mrs. 

lington, was 
cember 9th f n 
many, aceor 
celved from 
by his pare 

Pfc. Bell 
vice In Feb 
overseas in 
tering the 
in partne 

The tel 
parents t 
follows: 
"Mr. A> 
Burlingto 

The 
I assure 
in the 1 
F. Beil. 
died 5th 
as resul 
tion. L 



|MWJ>« 



armj 



recel 



% 

||ks that 

Knpathy 

Be. Wm. 

tes he 

ermany 

in ac- 

General." 

y by 

.an, of 

h. Sgt. 

lias been 

1944, was 

«mber 12, 

from the 

not give 

entered 

December 

s, son of 

is, of Con- 

■bunded in 

Ee fighting 

the army 18 

i been over- 

ffe attended 

was em r 

i a** and 

■■Joining the 

_jof Erlanger 
■jm the War 

0at her son 
In had been 
tion on De 

►y.. 

Dtekerson is the 
and Mrs. Arch P. 
the husband of 

falladay, 21, son of 
. M. Holladay, of 
was wounded in 
jropean theater in 
jng to a War De 
im received by his 



1. Erbaugh, 58 
Brethren Church 

Pastor, Stricken 

. Orion Eiuaugh age 58, past- 
or of Church of Brethren, died sud- 
denly of a heart attack at 5:20 p. 
m. Saturday, Dec. 16, while he and 
his wife were making a pastoral 
call at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Kermit D. Foster,, 202 Eaton Ave., 
Hamilton, Ohio. 

Rev. Erbaugh was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, April 18, 1885, 
the son of Samuel and Barbara 
Bootewalter Erbaugh. He was ac- 
tively engaged as a building con- 
tractor some years ago, but more 
recently had followed the calling 
of a minister. 

For the past 10 years Rev. Er- 
baugh served as pastor of the Con- 
stance Church and for the last two. 
years served both the Church of 
the Brethren In Constance and 
Hamilton, Ohio. He had been on 
the Southern Ohio District Mission 
Board for 16 years, and for a num- 
ber of years was chairman of the 
school board of Madison Township. 

Rev. Erbaugh leaves his widow, 
Omy Kuns Erbaugh, whom he m - 
rled January 11, 1911; one son 
Richard Erbaugh, Chicago, 111.; a 
granddaughter, Barbara Jo Er- 
baugh; three brothers Rev. Clar- 
ence Erbaugh, New Lebanon, Ohio; 
Charles Erbaugh, New Lebanon, 
and Howard Erbaugh, Dayton, O. 

Services were held at 1:30 Tues- 
day afternoon, Dec. 19 in the Rob- 
ert L. Klaus funeral home anc in 
the Church of the Brethren, Web- 
ster Ave. and E. Street, Hamilton 
at 2 o'clock. Burial was in the 
family lot in Bear Creek Cemetery, 
Montgomery County. 



Announced 

James Patten, of 
junce the engage 
fanddaughter, Miss 
Juby Huey, son 

Joe Huey, of Bur- 
ke wedding will be 



to 
cat 
obi 
you 

yoi 

yei 



CADGES TO 
BY CLERK 



)URT FOR DRIV 
)MMEROIAL VE- 
FOR LICENSE IS 
DEC. 31, 1945. 



Ion of the Legisla- 

the Circuit Coart 

Lot the counties of 

H for the Division 

irtatlon in the is- 

idges for the driv- 

ial vehicles. 

inty, A. D. Yelton, 

lerk, is Issuing the 

Jvers License. All 

fe a Motor Vehicle, 

for hire in haul- 

or property* are 

this license in 

[regular Operator's 

for the license is 

censes are valid 

[,'1945 until Decern - 

heretofore most per- 

to Frankfort for 

jut first had to have 

the application, and 

■ III Jll ft l»A -»* 4- *fi 

.».«-._„ UU w VU 

rom the Divisor* ** 

rtation in < Frank- 
it is not necessary 

:tor sign the appli- 
license can not be 

iding to Frankfort, 
them from your 

lerk, bringing with 
ficate from last 



REVENUE MAN TO 
VISIT BOONE CO. 



JANUARY 12 THROUGH 13 FOR 
PURPOSE OF ASSISTING IN 
PREPARING JANUARY 15TH 
DECLARATIONS. 

Collector of Internal Revenue, S. 
R. Olenn, announces that a deputy 
from his office will visit Burling- 
ton January 12 through 13th for 
the purpose of assisting farmers. in 
preparing their January 15 declar- 
ation returns or final returns. The 
time for farmers to file was ex- 
tended from December 15 to Janu- 
ary 15 in order that farmers could 
file their final returns by January 
15 and would be relieved of filing 
a declaration return in December. 
The farmers will have the option 
of filing a final return by January 
15 or filing a declaration return 
by January 15 and final return by 
March 15. Other taxpayers who 
should have filed an amended dec- 
laration can file a final return if 
they elect to do so. Mr. Glenn 
says that the new revenue act is 
In many particulars different from 
the laws previously in effect. Spec- 
ial attention is called to farmers 
who will be required to file the 
declaration returns by January 15 
or final returns, if 80 percent or 
more of their gross Income is from 
farming activities, and their in- 
come is sufficient from this source 
to require the filing of an income 
tax return. 

The Collector says that the many 
changes made eannot be explained 
in a short notice, but that his 
deputy is familiar with the law and 
is being sent here to be of real 
service to the taxpaying public. 
The service is absolutely free. 
Collector Glenn urges the taxpay- 
ers of this county to see the depu- 
ty and let him help them with 
their income tax problems. 



LOCKER FREEZER 



MEET IMPORTANT 



ATTENDANCE OF RURAL FOLK 
NECESSARY TO ASSURE IN- 
STALLATION OF LOCKER FOR 
BURLINGTON. . 



Large attendance at the Locker 
Freezer educational and organiza- 
tion meeting to be held at Bur- 
lington courthouse this Thursday 
evening, is is most important, ac- 
cording to H. R. Forkner, County 
Agent.. Failure to attend the meet- 
ing may be the deciding factor as 
whether or not plans for the de- 
velopment of the project is con- 
tinued. 

Speakers on the program in- 
clude Earl Welch from the College 
of Agriculture, Mary Hood Oillas- 
pie, Home Demonstration Agent, 
factory representatives and others. 
Be sure to attend this meeting. 



Alvin Calloway Held 

For Federal Authorities 



Alvin Calloway was arrested De- 
cember 24th , by Deputy Sheriff 
Irvin Rouse at Florence on a 
charge of breaking and entering 
the GillLspie Service Station, Flor- 
ence. 

Calloway was returned to Bur- 
lington and placed in jail, where 
he is being held for federal auth- 
itles. He was charged with selling 
stolen gasoline coupons. 



Thomas B. Ross 



Officers Named At 

Meeting Of F. & A. M. 

At a regular meeting of Burling- 
ton Lodge No. 264 F. & A. M. held 
on December 27, 1944, the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the 
year 1945: Thos. Hensley, Master; 
J. K. Cropper, Senior Warden; A. 
E. Stephens, Junior Warden; A. B. 
Rouse, Treasurer; C. L. Cropper, 
Secretary; A. D. Yelton, Tyler; W. 
C. Brown, Stewart; Wilton E. Step- 
hens, Stewart. 

After the election the Fellow- 
craft Degree was conferred on Rob- 
ert Maurer. This Lodge will hold 
regular meeting on every second 
and fourth Thursday nights' of 
each month as several candidates, 
are tsklqg the varJn"* rt«~— .... 
cording to C. L. Cropper, Secretary. 



Thomas B. Ross, 63, father of 
Lloyd Ross, former northern Ken- 
tucky bus operator, died Friday at 
Booth Hospital, Covington, after a 
two-day illness. 

Mr. Ross was a lifelong resident 
of Boone County, making bis home 
at Big Bone. 

Funeral services were held Tues- 

Bone Baptist Church with Rev. Rt 
A. Johnson officiating. Burial was 
in Big Bone Cemetery. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Maud Ross; three sons, Robert L. 
Ross, Charleston, S. O; Russell 
Ross, New York, N. Y., and Carl 
Ross, Silverton, Ohio, and five 
grandchildren. 

Tharp and Stlth, Florence funer- 
al directors were in charge of ar- 
rangements. 



WILL i FPEAR HERE SATURDAY NIGHT 



\ '■'*- 




■lit Lay ne and His Hill Billy Roundup 



BOONE COUNTY [TWO INJURED IN 



SHORT OF GOAL 



IN CHRISTMAS SEAL SALE — 
ONLY 25 PERCENT OF LETTERS 
MAILED RECEIVED FAVOR- 
ABLE REPLIES. | 



LACERAT IONS ABOUT FACE AND 
.-'HEAD SUFFERED BY EMMA L. 
CARROLL AND RALPH E. HAB 

ERFIELD. 



The Boone Comnty Christmas 
Seal Sale is far start of the goal 
set at $800.00, according to a re- 
port made to this paper by R. V. 
Lents, chairman of the committee 
in charge of the sale. It was re- 
ported that only 25 percent of the 
letters answered contained favor; 
able replies, 25 percent returned 
the seals, and 50 percent kept the 
seals without paying for them. 

All the schools have not as yet 
reported and this is expected to 
raise the sale of the seals consider 
ably. A full report" will be given 
in this paper as soon as it is avail 
able. 

Mr.. Lents further stated that it 
is not too late to tend your check 
to him. 



Louis Balsly 

Louis Balsley, of Boone County 
died at Booth Hospital, Wednes- 
day, December 27. He was 87 years 
of age. 

He is survived by one sister, Mrs. 
Adelia Crisler, of Burlington. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Catherman funeral home, Ludlow, 
December 29th at 2 p. m. Burial 
was in Hebron Cemetery. 



Simeon M. Kincade 

Funeral services were held Sat- 
urday in Covington, for Simeon M. 
Kincade, 64, motorman for the 
Cincinnati, Newport and Covington 
Railway Co. for more than 25 years. 
Mr. Kincade died Wednesday of 
last week at St. Elizabeth Hospital, 
Covington, after a brief illness. 
Burial was in Highland Cemetery. 

Mr.' Kincade resided at Verona, 



xvjf. 



w 



He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Addle Kincade; a daughter, Mrs. 
Ella Dauchet, Covington; four sons 
Rufus, Floyd, Cpl. James Kincade 
and Rufus Kincade; three brothers 
Elisha Kincade, John Kincade and 
William Kincade; two sisters, Mrs. 
Gertrude Alexander, and Mrs. Mar- 
garet Alexander. 



■/ 



HEBRON P.-T. A. 

i The Hebron P.-T. A. will hold a 
meeting Tuesday, January 9th at 
8:00 p. m., at the school. All mem- 
bers and friends are urged to at- 
tend. 



James Perry Ryle 

James Perry Ryle, 86, a resident 
of Burlington, died /Wednesday, 
December 20 at Central State Hos - - 
pltal, Anchorage, Ky. He was a 
member of the . Elsmere Baptist 
Church. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Mollie Ryle; one son Sam Ryle, of 
Burlington; four daughters, Mrs. 
Etta Underhill, Covington and Mrs. 
Maggie Johnson, Mrs. Nahnie Hor- 
ton, and Mrs. Minnie Eggleston, all 
of Boone County; two brothers, 
John W. Ryle, Burlington and 
Joseph Ryle, Virginia; three sisters, 
Mrs. Nora Satire* Mrs. Lillle Erick- 
son and Mrs. Fannie Hage, all of 
uaui.uiiiitt, and several grandchil- 
dren, n 

Funeral services were conducted 
Friday at 230 p. m. at the Talia- 
Friday at 2:30 p. m. at the Talia- 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, pastor of Bur- 
lington Baptist Church officiating. 
Burial was in the I. O. O. F. Ceme- 
tery, Burlington. 



Spends Christmas 

Vacation At Home 

Cadet Charles Patrick, Burling- 
ton, R. 1, spent the Christmas va- 
cation with home folks. He is at- 
tending Riverside Military Academy 
of Gainesville, Oeorgia. 

Cpl. Marvin R. Porter, of Lang- 
ley Field, Va., is enjoying a 15- 
day furlough with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Porter, of Bur- 
lington. 

Chief Petty Officer J. M. Smith, 
of Tallahassee, Fla., spent the 
Christmas holidays with his par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith, of 
Burlington'. His wife Mrs. Marjorie 
Smith and daughter Madge, ac- 
companied him. 

Smith was a recruiter in charge 
of the U. S. Navy Recruiting Sub- 
station in Covington for a year, 
leaving in October, 1943, to serve 
in a similar capacity at the Navy 
recruiting substation in Tallahas- 
see, Fla. He was recently promot- 
ed to the rank of Chief ePtty Of- 
ficer. 

Cpl. James Gayle Smith, station- 
ed at Topeka, Kans., with AAF 
spent part of the holidays with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Smith, 
of Burlington. 



Ted Cress Purchases 

Half Interest In Firm 



Ted Cress purchased a half in- 
terest in the business of his fath- 
er Calvin Cress, of Burlington, last 
week. 

Mr. Cress and his son will con- 
tinue to serve the public in the 
same manner as in the -past. They 
will maintain the dealership for 
McCormick-Deerlng farm equip- 
ment and are anxious to serve the 
farmers of Boone County. 

Ted, junior member of the firm 
has been employed by his father 
for many years, and is well ac- 
quainted with the needs of this 
section. " i. 



Roy W. Carpenter 

Funeral services for Roy W. 
Carpenter, 110% E. Fifth St., Cov- 
ington, a former resident of Boone 
County were held at 2:30 p. m. 
Tuesday at the Taliaferro funeral 
home, Erlanger. Burial was in the 
Carpenter Cemetery, Richwood. 

Mr. Carpenter died Saturday at 
his home after a brief illness. He 
was 59 years old. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Mary Doan Carpenter; a daughter, 
Miss Rowena Carpenter, Covington 
a son, Louis Carpenter, Covington; 
and two sisters, Mrs. R. F. De- 
moisey and Mrs. Olive Readnour; 
a brother, Ralph Carpenter, all of 
Boone County. 



CRASH ON U. S. 25 



Emma Lou Carroll, of Harrods- 
burg and Ralph E. Hajberfield, of 
Wheeling , W. V., suffered severe 
lacerations about the head and 
face, in an automobile! wreck one 
and a half miles south of Florence 
on U. S. 25, December 23. 

The accident occurred when the 
car driven by Haberf ield and an- 
other driven by Carl Hounshell, of 
Franklin, Ohio, sideswiped. The 
cars were traveling in opposite di- 
rections. 

Miss Carroll and Mr. Haberfield 
were removed to St. Elizabeth hos- 
pital for treatment, being released 
later. Other occupants of the two 
cars escaped injury, according to 
Deputy Sheriff Irvin Rouse, who 
was called to the scene of the acci- 
dent. 



Lt 






Sprague-Vahlsing 

On Saturday evening, December 
9, at 7:30 p. m. at Taylorsport, Ky., 
Miss Nelda Sprague, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Sprague, of 
Taylorsport, was joined hi wedlock 
to Pfc. Robert Vahlsing of Con- 
stance, Ky. » 

It was the first church wedding 
of its kind officated by Brother 
Lucas in the Taylorsport Church 
of Christ. 

The bride's hand was given by 
her father Mr. Ralph Sprague to 
the groom Robert Vahlsing who 
was home for a fifteen-day fur 
lough. The Wedding; March was 
played by Miss Emma Jean Austin. 

The bride wore a. gown of white 
satin with a fingertip veil and car- 
ried a bouquet of white roses, while 
her cousin Emmalou Sprague acted 
as maid of honor, was attired In 
a green satin gown with matching 
accessories and carried a bouquet 
of dark red roses. Two! of her school 
chums acted as bridesmaids, Miss 
Betty June Getker and Peggy 
Morehead, both dressed alike in 
pink satin and matching acces- 
sories and carried pink roses the 
shade of their gowns. 

The brother of the groom How- 
ard Vahlsing acted las best man, 
while Howard Regenbogen, a 
schoolmate and Earl Sprague, a 
brother of the bride! were attend- 
ants of Pfc. Robert Vahlsing. 

The church was decorated With 
lighted altar candles, candelight 
from the door down both sides to 
the altar, palm tree plants and 
ferns. 

A reception was ! given at the 
home of the bride following the 
ceremony. • 'J 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Vahlsing, Sr., 
and daughter Virginia entertained 
the bride and groom at their home 
in Constance on Thursday, Decem- 
ber 14th, giving a farewell dinner 
at six o'clock in honor of their son 
who returned to service the follow- 
ing day Members of his family were 
present at the dinner, wishing the 
young couple all the! best and hop- 
ing for a speedy return. 

— : — F — $ 

Home From South 

Pacific On Furlough 

Sgt. Major Edwin Hughes, of the 
U. S. Marines, is enjoying a . fur- 
lough ^rith relatives and friends 
in Northern Kentucky and Boone 
County. He recently returned 
from the Southwest Pacific where 
he has been stationed for the past 
thirty-one months. 

"Jake" as he is known to his 
many friends in Boone County ap- 
parently is enjoying the best of 
health, although he has had sev- 
eral attacks of malaria. 



r 



Hill Billy 

The Burlington Homemakers win 
sponsor a "Hill Billy Roundup" at 
the Burlington high school audi- 
torium, Saturday, January 6th, ac- 
cording to an announcement made 
Tueeday. • • 

Bert Lay ne and his boys are well 
known in this section, having ap- 
peared here recently under the 
sponsorship of the Burlington Vol- 
unteer Fire Department. Those 
appearing with Bert Layne are Pop 
Eckler, Bill Kruger, Don Cole, 
Arnold Staley, and Old Zeke. 

Proceeds derived from this en- 
tertainment will be used for ben- 
efit of the Ft. Thomas Convales- 
cent Hospital. . 

Don't forget the date Saturday, 
January 6, at 7:30 p. m. 

Refreshments will be served by 
the Homemakers during the enter- 
tainment. 



Firemen Will Elect 

Officers Friday Night 

The Burlington Volunteer Fire 
Department will elect officers at a 
call meeting Friday night, January 
5th at 7:30 p. m., it was announced 
this week. 

Officers elected at this meeting 
will serve until January 1, 1946. 

Regular business of the depart- 
ment will be conducted and a fin- 
ancial report given by the secre- 
tary and treasurer. All members 
are urged to attend this meeting. 



FARM BUREAU 
ELECT OFFICERS 



AT. ANNUAL KEERKS SffigJ* EH 
BURLINGTON, MONDAT-^BAK- 
QUET PLANS MAM FOB, 
RUARY. 



CEILING PRICE ON 
CORN $1.11 BU. 



WHITE CORN IS FIFTEEN CENTS 
HIGHER PER BUSHEL THAN 
SAME GRAPE NO. 2 YELLOW- 
PRICES SET BY OPA. 






The OPA advised the County 
Agent's office the past week that 
the present corn ceiling price in 
Boone County on the farm based 
on No. 1 and No. 2 shell corn is 
$1.11 per bushel. White corn is 
15 cents per bushel higher than 
the same grade No. 2 yellow corn. 

Additional mark-ups are listed 
as follows: 

For locally-grown corn, If deliv- 
ered by the producer elsewhere 
than on the farm where grown, 
iy 2 cents per bushel may be added 
to the farm price prevailing in the 
county in which delivery is to be 
made. 

A wholesaler (selling in lcl 
quantities) may add 4 cents per 
bushel over his net cost if corn Is 
warehoused by him, or only 2'yi 
cents per bushel if not so ware- 
housed. Only one wholesale 
markup is permitted. 

A retailer (from a store) may 
add 11 cents per bushel over his 
lawful net cost, or any other sale 
at retail other than by a trucker 
merchant, paragraph IV— 8 cents 
per bushel may be added. 

Plus, for wholesale or retail 
sales, transportation to buyers' 
receiving point: 

(a) If transportation services are 
hired, the amount paid for such 
services. 

(b) For distances less than 100 
miles in own truck. For ear or 
snapped corn, 6 cents per cwt. for 
the first 5 miles plus 2 cents for 
each additional 5 miles or frac- 
tion thereof. For shelled corn, 3 
cents per cwt. for the first 5 miles 
plus 1 cent for each additional 5 
miles or fraction thereof, or at re- 
tail only at option of retailer for 
distances less than 5 miles, $1.00 
per ton, or for distances over 5 
miles $1.50 per. ton. 

(c) For distances greater than 
100 miles the lowest carload rail 
freight rate between the rail 
points nearest the points of orig- 
ination and destination, plus 3 per 
cent federal freight tax, plus 8 
cents per cwt. » 

Any seller may add 2 cents per 
bushel for sacking plus the value 
of the sacks used if sacks are sup- 
plied by the seller. 

For corn originating at points 
out of the state and sold by 
"Trucker-Merchants," the maxi- 
mum deliver price will be the sum 
of. the maximum lawful price at 
the point of purchase plus trans- 
portation calculated in paragraph 
in, (b) or (c) above. 



W. M S. WILL MEET 



The W. M a of Burlington Bap- 
tist Church will meet at the 
church, January 10th at 2:30 p. m. 
An interesting program will be fol- 
lowed by monthly business session. 
Ail members are urged to be prea- [salurony. 
ent, and visitors cordially invited, [bran Cemetery. 



The Boone County Farm Bureau 
held its annual meeting at Bur- 
lington, Monday afternoon. Offic- 
ers elected for the new year were 
Walter King, president; S. D. S. 
Ransom, vice-president and John 
E. Crlgler, secretary-treasurer. New 
directors elected for two-year 
terms were J. C. Aeree, Hamilton; 
C. L. Hempfling, Constance; Lloyd 
Slekman, Petersburg; Chas. B. 
Bea.ll, Hebron; W. H. Presser, 
Grant; George Hell, Florence; Jos. 
Huey, Union; W. M King, Verona; 
H. E. White, Burlington and 8. D. 8. 
Ransom, Walton were elected for 
two-year terms last year were con- 
tinued in office. 

The bureau voted to con tr ibu t e 
$25.00 to the Ft Thomas Conval- 
escent Hospital Fund, to award 
prizes to Live-at-Home program 
winners and to give special recog- 
nition to county 4-H club cham- 
pions at the annual banquet. 

Special plans were made for the 
holdi ng of a county banquet in 
February. Committees were ap- 
pointed to complete arrangements 
for a dinner and securing of guest 
speakers. 

Lloyd Slekman and Walter King 
were appointed as county delegates 
to the State Farm Bureau Conven- 
tion to be held at Louisville, Janu- 
ary 10th, 11th and 12th. J. C 
Acree and Harold L. Crigler were 
appointed as alternate delegates. 




Local Girl Named Nay 
QueenAt* 



Mary Belle Smith, daughter of 
Rev. and Mrs. Will Smith, Burling- 
ton, has been elected May Queen 
of Georgetown College for Hie an- 
nual May Festival in the spring. 
The May Queen is selected by the 
student body on the basts of statli- 
ness, dignity, and queenly manner. 

Mary Belle, a Senior at George- 
town is an active member of Sigma 
Kappa "social sorority, a member of 
Kappa Delta, honorary speech 
fraternity, Vice-President of Inter- 
national Relations Club, member 
of Georgetonian (school p»?*r* 
and Belle of the Blue (college an- 
nual) staffs, and an active mem- 
ber in Maskrafters, College Choir 
and Girls' Glee dub. As well as 
being active in the academic and 
social life of the campus, Mary 
Belle has shown genuine interest 
in the religious activities. The very 
fact that Mary Belle was elected 
May Queen of the college shews 
her popularity among the students. 



Street Light Payment 
Due For 



The money for street lights in 
Burlington is due to be paid hi 
before January loth. Baoh light 
is $18.00 per year. 



HENRY KOTTMYER 
SUCCUMBS AT 85 



WAS 
PILOT— HAD 

OF CONSTANCE MOST OF H 
LIFE— SERVICES SATURDAY, 



Capt. Henry C. Kottmyer, 
ly known Ohio River ferry pilot, 
died Wednesday of last week aft his 
home In Constance at the age of 
85, after being in retirement aa a 
pilot for 20 years. 

He operated for many years a 
ferry across the Ohio River be- 
tween Constance and Anderson 
Ferry. The ferry has been operat- 
ed by some member of his family 
for three generations. Cast. Kott- 
myer was a native of Ohio and 
lived most of his life hi Constance. 

Captain Kottmyer had three sons 
and two of them, Oliver and Henry 
also became ferry pilots. The third 
son, George, is a CrumUnce merch- 
ant. 

Capt. Kottmyer is survived by his 
three sons, a daughter, Mrs. Henri- 
etta uraveu, «uau vm. ww»>.,, «_^ 
four sisters, Mrs. Emma Hempfling, 
Long Beach, Calif.: Mrs. Charles 
Hempfling, Taylorsport; Mrs. Car- 
rie McGlasson. Olnctnnatt, and 
Mrs. Nellie Hecker, Norwood, Ohio. 

Funeral services were held at the 
(residence in ****••*»>**— at 2 p. m. 










A 

a 



la^l L .u «. 1 ,1 . I 






the boons county recorder, bcrungton, Kentucky 



BUDHE COUNTY RECIIRIfER 



A. K. STEPHENS, 
RAYMOND OOBBBS. 



and Owner 
Editor 



at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mas Matter 



EVERY 



THUBBOAT 



BEST A DVEK 1 UKN O MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 

ADVERTISING INFORMATION 
25c per c£!H_m inch. 
JOTTCES AND CARDS or TBANK8: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 

words $1.00. 

CLASSIFIED ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
word one cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
column depth, 21 inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate | lt80 Per year 



MEMBER 

AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over fifty Ye 



MEMBER /"jg^ 

KENTUCKY PRESJ 
/^ASSOCIATION , 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

f 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

BURLINGTON 95 

We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

RURLINGTON, 



The Great Toe 




N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at — 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



./' 




Do .you know that the great toe 
supports the entire weight of the 
body for an instant, in the last act 
of walking? 

The foot muscles acting upon 
the four lesser toes preserve the 
balance of the body by causing the 
toe to grip in the shoes, and in the 
last act of walking to give the fin- 
al spring or "take off." By 
their attachment the toes flex at 
their first (holognel) Joints and 
extend at their second and third 



Joints, so that the ends of the 
toes are pressed upon and grip in 
standing so as to form powerful 
propelling levers as the body 
swings' forward upon the toes. 

Now, take off your shoes — and 
look at the bottom of your toes, In 
every case (there are few excep- 
tions) you will see where the 
fleshy tissue on the bottom ends of 
the toes come to a point from 
being forced tight together and In 
many cases the toes themselves lap 
over one another. This is posi- 
tive evidence of ill fitted and ill 
shaped shoes. This continued dis- 
tortion of toes _t many cases leads 
to bunions. Hommar toes and other 
toe defects. 

Lack of balance will cause you to 
walk incorrectly and create strain 
in other parts of the body, induc- 
ing fatigue, pain and more misery, 
NOT ONLY in the feet, but even in 
the back of the neck and bead- 
aches. Resolve right now to cor- 
rect' this condition. 

It costs you nothing for a thor- 
ough analysis of your fpot prob- 
lems and difficulties. Remember 
you can't be HAPPY with UN- 
HAPPY FEET.— Adv. 



Go To Church 



=X__S= II I I II 

BELLEVDSW BAFEWr CHURCH 
Rev, W. ■ Goth, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 
Morning worship 11:80 a, m. 
Evening wortship at 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Everyone la cordially Invited to 
nttend these services. 



BURLINGTON R. 2 



BBHHnHE__^: 




Mr. and Mrs. Cam White and 
Mrs. Percy Ryle were calling on 
Mr. and Mas. Jacob Cook, Saturday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lou Williamson 
and daughter Mary Lqu were in 
town Christmas shopping, Satur- 
day. — t-t4 
' Mr. and Mrs. Prest West attend- 
ed church Sunday in East Bend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cam White and 
Pauline spent the week-end at the 
farm. 

Members of the Howard Presser 
family were in Covington shopping, 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Bert Scott, Mrs. Wm. Press- 
er, Mrs. Jack Purdy and Mrs. Jacob 
Cook attended the hog killing at 
Mrs. Bess Clores, Saturday. 

Quite a few have marketed their 
tobacco and received good prices. 

The writer wishes the editor and 
subscribers a Merry Christmas and 
the best wishes for the New Year. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Root. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. , — 

Morning services 11 a. m. First 

and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST, D. D. 

Of Tii* Moodr Blbto In«tltut« o* Chicago. 

ItelMMd by Wwttrn Hawapapar union. 



Lesson for January 7 

■ u 

. l«Mon (ubjecti and Scripture Uxta «*- 
lecUd and copyrighted by International 
Council of Bellgloua Education i used by 
parmlMton. 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Watnscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Gilby 
Green Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

You are invited to come— wor- 
ship an ' work with us. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 

. CHURCH 

Milton A. Wllmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



B. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



POSTED 

All persons are' nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. _) Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. ■ 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Claude R. McDonald. Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. R. R. 
Withfcm, Supt. 



We invite 
us Sunday. 



you' to worship with 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Sam S. Hogan, Pas tor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 

Harry Rouse, Supt. 
Morning Worship 11 a . m. (CWT) 
B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT). 
Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 

p. m. (CWT). 
Prayer services each Wednesday 

evening 8:30 (CWT). 
Services each Sunday. You are 

cordially invited to worship with 

us. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 up 

Cold Wave 

Immanent $10.00 up 

Majce appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. <* 
Morning Worship 11:00 a. m, 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Thursday evening 

at 7:30 p. m. 
Services held each Sunday. The 

public is cordially invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



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KENTUCKY 




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ailMdhfftmKbU.S. 

Approved. Blood-teated, started chick* one, two »nd 

PHEE CATALOG .Write? K— (TUCKV HATCHIRY 
WWMTIOUWHWmt • UEHNOTOM. UEMTUCZY 






BRING YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

. , TO 

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Regal Store 






AT 



llOO^FIKE STREET 



| marked in plain figures. 



Chambers & Grubbs 




FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



WALTON 352 _E 

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COVINGTON 

For Full Price and Honest 
Weight 

Phone: HEmlock 6135 
Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Carl J. Walnscott. Pastor 
Sunday School each Sunday at 

10:30 IC. W. T.) Ed Shinkle, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 

a. m. 
Evening Service at 7:?l> (C.W.T.) 
B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday night 

at 8:00. 



CONSTAN CE CH URCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaagn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at ?:30. 

You need your church. 



PETERSB URG M ETHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 
Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 

B, T. U. 6:45 p. m. . 

Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. 

Morning Worship at 11:00. 
. B. T. 7:15 (CWT) for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
8:00 p. m. " 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 



'' W. E. Maners, Pastor 

10:00 A. M. Sunday School 

H:00 A. M. Worship. , 

7:30 P. M. B. T. U. 

8:00 P. M Evangelistic Service. 

8:00 P. M. Wednesday, Prayer 
and Bible Sturdy. — 

Third Monday night; men's meet- 
ing. 



. THE CHILDHOOD OF JESUS 

LESSON TEXT— Matthew 1:13-23. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Behold. I am with thee, 
and will keep thee In aU placaa whither 
thou goest— Genesli 38:13. 



Matthew is the Gospel of the King 
and His kingdom. It stresses the 
fulfillment of prophecy in the com- 
ing of Christ, the King. After His 
rejection, it tells us of the Church, 
"the kingdom in mystery," and of 
the death of Christ for our sins, His 
resurrection for bur justification, 
and His glorious coming again. 

This then is an important book 
which we study for the next three 
months. Teacher and student alike 
should be enthusiastic and expect- 
ant. 

The genealogy of the King, and 
the story of His coming to earth as 
the babe of Bethlehem (both impor- 
tant matters), are covered in chap- 
ter 1. In our lesson we find Him 
as a little child. Observe how man 
received Him, and how God cared 
for Him. Without assigning definite 
verses to our points we note that: 

I. Men Received or Rejected 
Jesus. 

It has always been so. Men, then 
as now, were either for Him or 
against Him. The world or today is 
far different from that of the first 
century, but the difference is all on 
the outside. Almost breath-taking 
have been the developments of mod- 
ern science, ,but these have not 
changed the heart of man. He still 
fears and hates and fights and sins. 

His attitude toward Christ is un- 
changed. There are still only two 
classes of people in the world — those 
who have received Christ and/ are 
saved, and those who have rejected 
Him and are lost. 

1. Men Are Against Christ. 

How do men show their rejection of 
God's Son? Just as they did at 
His birth, by: 

a. Fear. Herod was afraid lest 
the coming of this One should result 
in the loss of his ill-gotten gains. 
His anger and fear made all Jeru- 
salem afraid. . 

b. Indifference. When the Wise 
Men asked where Christ was to be 
born, the priests and scribes knew 
exactly where to find the facts in the 
Holy Scriptures, but having done so, 
they relapsed into utter indifference. 
They had no interest in. the fulfill- 
ment of the prophecy. 

c. Hatred. Herod poured out the 
violence of his heart by killing the 
first-born. He was the first of many 
who have raged against the Christ 
in futile anger. 

• d. Sorrow. The tears of the moth- 
ers of Jerusalem but foreshadowed 
the weeping and wailing which char- 
acterizes Christ-rejection both in 
time and eternity. 

2. Men Are For Christ. 

Thanks be to God, there were 
those in that day who were for 
Christ and, like those who follow 
Him today, they showed: 

a. Spirituality. Men have mar- 
veled that the Magi knew of the 
birth of Christ. They must have 
studied the prophecies of the Word 
and been responsive to the teach- 
ing and moving of the Holy Spirit. 
Can we say as much for ourselves? 

b. Interest. Not content to know 
and to marvel, they shamed the 
priests of Israel by their persistent 
interest in this great thing which 
had come to pass. 

c. Love. They brought themselves 
in worship and they brought rich 
gifts from their treasures. You can 
give without loving, but you cannot 
love without giving. ■ -i-i — 

d. Action. They came. They per- 
sisted until they found the Christ. 
Then they listened to God and pro- 
tected His Son by not returning to 
Herod. 7 

H. God Protected and Prepared 
Jesus. 

The ruin which sin had brought 
into the world could onl v be met b v 
redemption which Christ had come 
to bring. Some men had already 
shown their hatred for Jesus and 
their rejection of Him. But God still 
ruled, and for the sake of those who 
received Him (and would receive 
Him in all the centuries since), He 
kept the Child Jesus from harm. We 
find Him: 

1. Protecting Jesus. Men may 
hate and seek to destroy God's Son. 
Satan may inspire them with ingen- 
uity and cunning. But see how the 
Eternal One spoke to Joseph in 
dreams, how He prepared a place 
of refuge in Egypt and ultimately" 
in Nazareth, where the boy, Jesus 
might increase in wisdom and stat- 
ure and favor with God and man. 
' 2. Preparing Jesus. God knew of 
the days of public ministry which 
were ahead, and above all, of that 
day when on Golgotha's hill Christ 
waV in Hi _own body, to prepare 
salvation for you and for me. God 
is never taken by surprise.- He 
moves forward to the completion of 
His plnn with the stately tread of 
eternity.: 

He took Jesus to Egypt. He 
brought Him again to Nazareth. In 
it all He was preparing His Son 
for the days of ministry which were 
ahead. All this was in fulfillment ol 
prophecy (see w. 1 5, 1 7). God's 
word is always sure. 



FORTY 

From the Files of. 
ISSUE 



AGO 

»ty Recorder 



Gunpowder 

Mrs. J. C. Hankins and 
daughter Oma, of Hebron, 
last Friday with Mrs. Flor 
Floyd. 

P. O. Griffin and family of 
langer were guests of M. R. T 
ner, Saturday night and 
Richwood 

J. T. Powers, Martin Bailey an 
Carry Carpenter gave parties t 
the delighted young folks during 
the holidays. . 

Mr. Clark and son Richard, of 
Ludlow were guests of Ell Carpent- 
er, last week. > ■"' 
Idlewlld 

Courtney Walton and wife were 
guests at B. C. Graddy's Sunday. 

Mrs. Milton Souther spent one 
day last week with her sister, Mrs. 
Owen Allen near Petersburg. 
Commissary 

W. T. Ryle and wife spent Christ- 
mas with their son-in-law, Bern- 
ard Rogers and wife, near Belle- 
view. 

Ira Ryle of near here attended 
the dance at Charley Kelly's Tues- 
day night. 

Grant 

Mrs. Al Nixon and children vis- 
ited Mrs. Roland McCarty, Satur- 
day night and Sunday. 

Miss Lydia Minish, of Aurora, 
spent Christmas week with Miss 
Alma Corbin. 

Walton 

Miss Stella Carpenter, of Flor- 
ence is the charming guest of 
friends here. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Booth enter- 
tained with a delightful New Year's 

dinner. 

. 

Hebron 

B. E. Aylor has purchased Frank 
Hossman's residence and will take 
possession, March 1st. 

Mrs. Harriet Hicks and family 
and Harry Hleks, of Covington 
were guests of C. E. Clore and fam- 
ily, Sunday. 

Limaburg 

Misses Grace and Clara Ander- 
son had for their guests Thursday, 
Misses Lena Davis, Essie Beemon 
and Myrtle Clore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Rouse enter- 
tained New Year's Eve with an 
oyster supper. 



far 

Bei 

wife! 



19*5 



Beaver 

pearl, daughter of T. J. 
very sick with pneu- 

le Cleek, who has been 
flap the holidays at home, will 
$ fo^Georgetown College this 

Bellevue 
Ifwitt and wife, of Aur- 
lests at Sebern Berk- 
Saturday and Sunday. 
py here is grieving be- 
le serious illness of Mrs. 

luHittsvffle 

spent several days 
Q*A., Gaines and 
low. 

•[wife, of North 
it Brown and 
last week. 
BOne 

h* onH f amOtr n j 

— • ■— e«e*4MIJ «*L 

dinner at Mr. 
Wtprday. 
wife were visit- 
E. Jones and 
lttay. 



: 



Mr. and 
dren of 
Mr. and 
day. 

Mr. CM 
spent Saturdl 
Mrs. Elizabeth 

Person] 

Howard and 
Walton, were 
Burlington a 

Miss Essie Pal 
Sunday from a 
at Erlanger. 



IWolf and chll- 

guests of 

er, Satur- 

lllittsville, 
iday with 



Huey, of 
llatives in 
last week. 

ted home 
relatives 



LANG'S 

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New temporary location, next door, i 
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elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathet 



TUB BOOMS COUNTY BICORDER, BURLDJQTON, KENTUCKY 



THE BAT KNEW IT FIRST 
By Rachel L. Carson 

Radar, with Its power to safe- 
guard night-flying planes against 
crashes into mountainsides or col- 
lisions with other aircraft, is an 
old story in the world of nature. 
Its advantages were discovered by 
t that odd creature, the bat, at 
* least sixty million years ago. Ever 



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271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KT. 

Phone Florence 491 — — 
TRY OUR* SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
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hair shining luster. We also 
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Open evening by appointment 



since the day when a small, mouse- 
like animal spread leathery wings 
and became the first mammal — 
and to date, the only one — to ac- 
quire the power of flighty the bat 
has been flying about the dark 
places of the earth and doing re- 
markably we'll about avoiding the 
trees, cliffs and buildings In his 
path. He escapes mishap by using 
a system that bears an uncanny 
resemblance to radar. " 

As everyone knows, radar detects 
approaching planes or other ob- 
jects in the sky by filling the air 
with a series of high frequency 
radio waves, then receiving the 
echo that bounces back- from any- 
thing in the path of the signals. 
The bat's method Is very similar. 
Instead of radio waves, he sends 
out a staccato swi«s of high pitch- 
ed cries. 

These are not the squeaks you 
hear as he flies overhead on a 
summer evening; the bat's radar 



ujGGME tax PAYERS! 

THREE IMPORTANT DATES' 

JANUARY 1ft— Farmers to File Estimate or Final Return.. All 
taxpayers to file amended estimated return if necess 
sary. 

MARCH 15— All Taxpayers to file Final Return. 

APRIL 15— All taxpayers to file Kentucky Tax Return, 

Competent assistance on these dates will save you time, trouble 
and money. I have the latest interpretations 
of the law and will give Individual 
consideration to your return 



Prepared Returns For Servicemen Free of Charge 



OTWELL RANKIN 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

208 ERLANGER ROAD, 
DIXIE 7784-W ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

P. S. Bring your 1943 return, cancelled checks, Income state- 
mens and other necessary records. 



signals are pitched too high for 
human ears to hear — too high, 
perhaps, for the ears of any crea- 
ture except himself. These super- 
sonic cries fin the pace Into which 
he Is frying. They strike some ob- 
ject in his path.^No matter wheth- 
er it is as large as the side of a 
hill or as small as a single strand 
of wire, the signals are reflected 
or echoed back to his keen ears. 
The echo warns him to change his 
course and avoid collision. 

This amazing system, antedating 
modern electronics by millions of 
years, has been revealed by two 
scientists working in the labora- 
tories of Harvard University, Doct- 
ors Robert Galambos, now of the 
University of Rochester Medical 
School, and Donald Griffin. Every 
since 1794, when Spallanzani per- 
formed the first experiments on 
the flight of bats, researchers have 
been trying to explain the bats 
ability to fly in complete darkness 
without accident. 

Alter proving that bats do not 
depend on sight to dodge ob- 
stacles—blindfolded bats flew Just 
as well as those that could see — 
Galambos and Griffin made an im- 
portant discovery: the bats blund- 
ered helplessly If their ears were 
plugged or if their mouths were 
taped shut. To detect objects in 
their path, apparently they had to 
hear something. But what? Since 
they also required freedom to open 
their mouths, evidently they heard 
sounds they uttered themselves. 

To discover whether the bats 
might be producing sound inaud- 
ible to human ears, Galambos and 
Griffin borrowed elaborate sound- 
detection apparatus from Harvard's 
professor G. W. Pierce, a specialist 
in supersonics. When the instru- 
ment, capable of translating sup- 
ersonic sound waves into audible 
sound, was set up in the laboratory, 
the bats were again released. In- 







: 



HAPPY 
NEW YEAH 



1945 IS HERE. ALL HAIL TO THE NEW 

YEAR! THIS IS THE SEASON FOR 

NEW RESOLUTIONS. 



\ 



i 




TREAT EYES KINDLY 

It has been said that 
"Reading maketh a full man." 
With clear vision and com- 
fortable eyes, you will get 
more pleasure and benefit 
from reading. 

Give your eyes the best 
kind of treatment — they are 
too precious to neglect. Have 
them examined at the first 
sign of eye discomfort or 
poor vision. 

We have the necessary 
modern equipment and long 
experience to give you reli- 
able optical service. Our 
many pleased patrons are 
our best advertisement. 






We have served you well in the 
past. Our aim is to serve you still 
better in the future. To this end 
we pledge our full devotion. 

We want you to be happy this 
New Year's ... and during the 
weeks and months that follow. 



—r — - 



HOCKETT CO. 



JEWELER 



Erlanger, 



.- 



Kentucky 




chxhxhzhxhxh:chzhzhxhzhzh 



stantly the apparatus gave out a 
tremendous, chattering clamor. 
The din continued as long as there 
was a bat in the air, ceased as 
soon as the last bat had tired of 
fluttering about the room. 

When their tests were finished, 
the Harvard scientists had a com- 
plete picture of the bat's method 
of blind flying. This isjyhat hap- 
pens: When a bat is about to take 
off — from his perch or on. the in- 
side of your window shutters— toe 
begins to send 'out his signals, a 
series of supersonic cries. At first, 
the cries are uttered at a compar- 
atively slow rate, less than ten per 
second. Then, as the bat launches 
out into the air, ^hey oome faster, 
at a steady rate of thirty per sec- 
ond. 

Now, something happens. The bat 
hears a faint echo of his cries 
coming back to him — trouble 
ahead! Instantly he speeds up his 
cries, uttering up to fifty a sec- 
ond. The Increased burst of sound 
apparently gives a stronger echo, 
telling his alert brain just where 
the obstacle is. He changes his 
course until the echo becomes 
fainter, dies away. Then, as he 
speeds safely past the tree or post 
or church steeple, his cries uiop 
back to the cruising level of thirty 
per second. 

Why don't we hear the .clamor 
of the bat's Incessant cries as he 
flits about overhead? It's la mat- 
ter of the frequency of th4 sound 
wave. The bat's signaling voice 
lies in the wave band of about 50,000 
cycles or vibrations per second. Hu- 
man ears detect sound anywhere 
in the base from 20 to 20,000 
cycles. The limit of hearing for 
dogs and cats Is a£>out 35,000 cycles, 
and for rats about 40,000. These 
figures are higher than those for 
any other mammals tested, except 
bats, which appear to hear sounds 
up to at least 98,000 cycles, per- 
haps higher. 

Not only are they equipped to 
hear their own signals; bats have 
extraordinary well-developed vocal 
apparatus for uttering these high 
frequency sounds. For years, an- 
atomists have marveled at the 
great development of the bat 
larynx. In one species, the African 
hammerheaded bat, this organ is 
so enormous that it is one third 
as large as the entire body cavity. 
In all bats, the vocal cords are 
short and tough. Large muscles 
are attached to the voice box in 
such a way as to put great tension 
on the cords. 

How bats developed their; sonic 
detection apparatus is not known, 
but of all animals they are most 
In need of some such device. Prac- 
tically all bats are night feeders 
and most live on insects which they 
capture on the wing, dodging, 
twisting and turning in intricate 
aer-maneuvers. Some live in dense 
forests, where they hunt among 
the trees. Others use deep lime- 
stone caverns as sleeping quarters. 
Entering and leaving the caverns, 
the bats must fly long" distances 
through the pitch-black corridors. 
The bat's radar system some- 
times means more than Individual 
safety. Mother bats carry their 
newborn young with them during 

Jj the first days of life. The young- 
ster clings to Its mother's fur with 
j claws and teeth, and rides with her 



far into the night skies as she 
searches for food. After a few 
days, however— perhaps when the 
young bat becomes too heavy to 
maintain his perilous hold— moth- 
er leaves him at heme, hanging him 
up in good bat fashion by his hind 
claws on the wall of their cave 
while she goes ahunting. 

Fossil records, which often tell 
much about the beginnings of an- 
imals, are Incomplete in the case 
of the bat. The earliest known 
fossil is quite a good replica of 
present-day models and helps not 
at all in revealing what the first 
bats were like or who were their 
ancestors. The first known bat 
lived in Eocene days, that curious 
period some sixty million years 
ago when tropical plants grew in 
Alaska. 4?r 

But long before the first fossil 
record, the ancestors of Urn bat. 
scientists believe, was a shrewlike 
creature, tree-limbing, flightless. 
When these forerunners of bats 
were learning, first to leap from 
tree to tree, then to make long 
glides from the treetops to the 
ground, and finally to launch out 
into aerial space, they musjt have 
developed, along with leathery 
«lng3, the special faculties that 
probe the darkness and make night 
flying safe. There must have been 
failures and fatal crashes in those 
early trials. We know only that 
those pioneering bats finally suc- 
ceeded, that they perfected and 
used the counterpart of radar mil- 
lions of years before man labori- 
ously developed it. 



Lavanler Supply Co., on* of Cov- 
ington's leading plumbing and 
electrical stores, has changed its 
name to Bluegrass Supply Co. This 
company was founded 30 years ago 
by the deceased, F. J. Lavanler, 
and was recently purchased by 
Anthony T. Dlbo, of Covington. 

Mr. Dibo is planning to carry 
the most complete line of plumb- 
ing and electrical merchandise 
available. This firm has recently 
been selected as a Winkler Stoker 
and Penn Packaged boiler distrib- 
utor In this territory. Mr. Dibo 
invites the continued patronage 
of all the store's former custom 
■era. . ' ■•-""• '- ; — — 7 




Used Fmave 



. NOTICE 

The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington win be in operation 
provided 180 signers Can be obtain- 
ed' in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board If you 
are Interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 







Mm FuBtoe 
Store 



48-434 

Covington, 




\ 



The above story, reprinted with 
permission, from Collier's, helps to 
give you a limited picture of RA- 
DAR, the Navy's secret weapon. 

Men from 17 years of age up, 
both volunteers and inductees, may 
take the Eddy Aptitude test for 
Radar Radio Technicians. Those 
who pass are inducted into the 
Navy as Seamen First Class and 
given a 10 months' course valued 
at $5,000. A majority of the 
graduates of this course are made 
Petty Officers. Among the post- 
war fields open to Radar trained 
men are Aviation, Radio, Electro- 
nic Engineerings, and Television. 

You can obtain full information 
— plus much helpful advice about 
passing the Eddy Test— at your 
nearest Navy Recruiting Station. 

HelpjjrinJh^iWr and qualify for 
a splendid post-war job by work- 
ing for a Radio Techician's rating 
in America's fighting Navy. 



Income Tax Service To Farmers! 

Farmers, if you have a gross income of $500 or 
more the Federal Revenue Department says yon 
must file an income tax declaration by January 
15.. You may save the trouble of filing this dec- 
laration if you file your 1944 income tax return 
by Jan. 15 instead of waiting until March 15. 
Let me help you to file your return. Rates Rea- 
sonable. Office No. 1, Lloyd Ave., Florence, Ky., 
evenings 6 to 10 except I will have no office 
hours from Dec. 28 to Jan. 1 inclusive. 
CONSTANCE office hours evenings Jan. 12 and 
13 at the school house 6 :30 to 9 :00 Bring all last 
year's tax duplicates and 1944 forms. 

R. V. LENTS 

PHONE FLORENCE 116 






Homemakers 
report knitting 
the Red Cross 
year. 



in Henry county 
210 garments for 
during the past 



Mr. and Mrs. Chester O. Ranck 
of Owsley county have completed 
their 14th year as leaders of the 
Lucky Pork 4-H Club. 



I 



JANUARY 15th | 

THE LAST DAY FOR FILING YOUR 1944 
INCOME TAX RETURN 

without incurring any penalty charges If there is a variance \ 
S between your estimated tax and the actual tax due. For = 
prompt and effective compliance with the New Tax Law, : 
consult 

ISRAEL ARON 

TAX CONSULTANT - ACCOUNTANT and AUDITOR 

32 East Seventh St. Hlland 2718 Covington, Ky. == 

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIllHIIHIIII^ 



en 



. 




zgs&ri 



>**i 



K? Da 



For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

ERLANGER KENTUCKY 




ri, <*ttJ«J;v.U'..-.-. 



• 



More Power to You! 

■yOU KNOW how a snowball 
* gets bigger and bigger as you 
roll it along. That's the way we 
want it to be with you. As 1945 
rolls along we hope that with each day your 
opportunities will become bigger and better 
— and that each day will add measurably to 
your store of blessings. 




Colonial Coal & Supply Company 

Erlanger, Kentucky 



Will SaVe You Money And Give 
_ You The Following Benefits: 



1. The average family saves $60.00 to $100.00 per year by us- 
ing locker service. 

2. You can butcher anytime of the year— summer or winter. 



3. 75 Percent less work required than in canning fruits and 
vegetables. 

4. Preserve the garden-fresh flavor and food value of your 

own fruits and vegetables. 

5. A locker will serve as your stock of fresh fruits, vegetables 
and meats. One locker will hold a quarter of beef and one 
hog or approximately 100 frying chickens or the equivalent 
in fresh fruits and vegetables. Restocked as needed it will 
serve as a year round supply of fresh fruits. 

6. You can serve roasting ears, fresh cantaloupe or fried 
chicken for Christmas or any time during the year. 

A EttOZEN FOOD LOCKER 

WILL GIVE YOU ALL OF THESE ADVANTAGES 



AND STILL SAVE XUL) MUttttx 



GIVE IT YOUR SUPPORT! 




1 



. JANUABT i, 1MB 



THM BOONE COUNTY RECORDER BURLINGTON, EJPtt ' UCfl H l 



HEBRON 



Beall, of Florence spent Christmas 
Day with Mr. and Mrs. M Baker. 
The Lutheran Sunday School 
program was very much enjoyed 



Mrs. Mick Furnish Hew to Miami, 

Fla., to Join her husband, who is t 
In the U., S. Navy, for the holiday by a large audience Christmas 

•Br* 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Crigler and 
Mrs. Omer Dolwick entertained 
Sunday for Mr. and Mrs. Wood- 
ford Crigler and son and Mrs. 
Sterling Dickey. 

Cpl. Omer Dolwick spent a three- 
day furlough during the holidays 
with his family and other rela- 
tives. 



Mr. and Mrs. John Crigler enter* 
tamed a group of relatives Christ- 
mas Day. : 

Several from here attended the 
funeral services of Capt. Henry 
Kottmyer at the residence In Con- 
stance, Saturday afternoon. Inter- 
ment was In Hebron Cemetery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. England and 
Mrs. Addle Aylor spent Christ- 
mas Day with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. 
Jones and family, of Burlington. 

Funeral services for Louis Balsly 
were held at the Catherman fu- 
neral home Friday at 2 p. m. In- 
terment was in Hebron Cemetery. 

Mrs. Henry L. Aylor spent one 
afternoon last week with Mrs. W. 
R. Qarnett. 

Mrs. 8. M. Graves and Mrs C. T. 
Tanner were Thursday afternoon 
guests of Mrs Frank Aylor. 

Miss Minnie Baxter and Chas. 



was the guest several days of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ray Botts. 

Miss Gertrude Smith returned 
home Friday evening from Illinois. 
She was accompanied by Miss 
Thein. 

Mrs. Viola Hickey. of Covington 
was the guest of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. S. M. Graves. 

Mrs. Sterling Dickey received 
word from Pvt. Dickey the past 
week that he is now in France, 
having—been- in England since 
July. 

Miss Alline Stephens, of Cin- 



Mrs. Howard Ledford and sonlclnnati and Miss Marilyn Garnett 



spent Sunday and Monday with A. 
Ledford and daughters, of Lexing* 
ton. 

Mrs. Bessie Ernst spent the hol- 
idays with her son, Raymond and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Aylor and son 
were among guests to spend the 
day Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Riddle, of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Peel entertain- 
ed several relatives Christmas Day 

Mrs. Maude Duley of Aurora, Ind 



JANUARY^ 

CLEARANCE 

SALE! 



V 



Entire stock of Men's, Ladies and 
Chiiddren's clothing at 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand,'* 
"Poll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"Hie House of Quality" — Tour Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, :' -:- KENTUCKY 



of Ludlow, spent several days dur- 
ing the holidays with— Mrr and 
Mrs. M. M. Garnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Marshall and 
daughter of Bulllttsville spent De- 
cember 24 with Mr. and Mrs. E. K. 
Stephens and Mr. and Mrs. Myron 
Garnett. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tanner 
and sons and Ronnie Garnett 
spent 'New Year's Eve wtyh Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Prather and sons, of 
Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Conner and 
family spent Christmas Day with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Wernz, of Bromley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Conner, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cecil Conner and chil- 
dren, Mr. and Mrs. John Conner 
and son and Miss Mary Conner 
were Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Vaughn Hempfling and daughters 
of (near- Taylorsport. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodrow Hall, of 
Newport spent Sunday, Dec. 24 with 
Mrs. Carvin Goodridge and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Esten Snyder spent 
Christinas Day with Mr. and Mrs. 
Herbert Grant and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dolwick and 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Dolwick and 
daughter called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Elmer Goodridge, Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Walton Rice returned to his 
work this week after being con- 
fined to hfs home the past week 
with a sprained back. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Watts are 
ithe proud parents of a baby boy 
since Dec. 18. The little one has 
been named Roger Dale. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ansel Brooks, Mr. 
and Mrs. Allen Goodridge and Mr. 
and Mrs. Clarence Wolfe called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Clore, Saturday 1 
evening of last week. 

Tommy Henson spent Wednes- 
day night with Lloyd Moore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester G&odridge 

entertained Thursday night, Dec. 

28 for their son ...Billy Louis' 11th 

birthday. Those present were ^fe 

Land Mrs. Wm. Goodridge, Mr. and 

Mrs. H. L. McGlasson, Mr. and Mrs. 

! Robert Hafer and daughter, Mr. 

I and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer and Mr. 

| and Mrs. Lloyd McGlasson and 

I daughter. 

Mrs. Robert Hodges had the mis- 
' fortune to fall last week on the ice, 



injuring her head. James Hart alto 
fell and fractured some ribs. Ray 
Botts Is also suffering from a fan. 

Mrs. Mary Utz and daughter 
spent a few days last week with Mr. 
and Mrs. Barney Turner, of Hill 
Top. , 

Mrs. Hallle Herbstreit and son 
Donald spent New Year's Day with 
Mrs. Ida Watts and family. 

John Whitaker called on Mr. and 
Mrs. C. O. Whitaker and family on 
Saturday. 

Friends of Yancey Clore regret to 
learn that he remains very ill at 
the home of his son, Chas. 

Friends here of Mrs. Gladys Jack- 
son,- Sand Run, will be interested 
to know she is a patient at River- 
side T. B. Hospital, Riverside, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd McGlasson 
and Mr. and Mrs. Chester Good- 
ridge and son spent Christmas 
Day with Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Mc- 
Glasson and Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Hafer. 

Mrs. Mamie Bullock spent Tues- 
day of last week with Miss Jessie 
Gordon. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Bowman and 
family spent Sunday, Dec. 'tA with 
Mr. and Mrs. Hobert Willoughby 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Kilgour 
entertained Sunday for Mrs. Emma 
Mooie and family, Mrs. Lawrence 
Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. John Kil- 
gour and family. 

Mrs. Claire Goodridge and chil- 
dren spent Sunday night and 
Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Goodridge. 

Friends of Paul Menze of the U. 
S. Marines and formerly of Hebron 
are sorry to hear he is critically ill 
in a hospital at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, suffering from a tropical 
fever. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle afnd 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. .Sdjyj- 
moul Wilson and son Alfred spent* > 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Bern- 
ard Wilson. 

The Masonic Lodge held their in- 
stallation of officers and entertain- 
ed their families with an oyster 
supper at the school house, Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Mrs. Clifford Tanner and Mrs. 
S. M. Graves called on Mrs. B'rank 
Aylor -on Tuesday afternoon of 
last week. 

The Hebron Horhemakers' Club 
will hold their regular monthly 
meeting January 10th at the home 
of Mrs. Harold Schneider. 



Mrs. Ona Kephardt 

Funeral services for Mrs. Ona 
Kephardt, of Walton were conduct- 
ed from Chambers & Grubbs fu- 
neral home Monday at 11 o'clock 
with the Rev. R. F. Demoisey la 
charge. Burial was in New Castle 
Cemetery. 

Mrs. Kephardt passed away In 
her home Friday following a long 
illness. She was. the widow of the 
late Warren T. Kephardt of Emin- 
ence, Ky. 

Mrs. Kephardt Is survived by one 
daughter, Martha Elizabeth Kep 
hardt, stationed at Hunter College 
U. S. N.; one son Tommy Warren 
Kephardt, Walton. 

Chambers Sc Grubbs were In 
charge of funeral arrangements. 



RABBIT HASH 



SYCAMORE VALLEY 



MARSHALL-HARRIS 
TOBACCO WHSE 



With Ms You Get The High Dollar 



)j. 



-■■ 



Fifteen years of leadership on the Carrollton 
market has made the name of ^Marshall- 
Harris a symbol of satisfaction to tobacco 
growers from far and wide. 



' Mrs. Sam Barnes entertained 
Christmas Day with a turkey din- 
net. Those present were Mr. and 
Mrs. Norman Craddock and fam- 
ily, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Barnes and 
daughter, Mr. and . Mrs. Lawrence 
Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. George Mob- 
ley and son, Mr. and Mrs. .Bob 
Hodges and children, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Black and son, Mrs. Amual 
Hensley, Mrs. Jake Fleek and Jean 
Fleek. All left wishing Mrs. Barnes 
a Happy New Year. 

Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ed East- 
on, Saturday night were Mr. and 
Mrs. Roscoe Akin and family, Mr. 
and Mrs. Earl Sullivan and Rex. 
Berkshire. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Fleek and 
family '•pent Saturday night with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs.' Jake 
Fleek and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Dickerson 
and family, Miss Jean Fleek were 
Tuesday evening guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Douglas Daley and family. 

Miss Ida Mae Fleek spent the 
week-end with her parents', Mr. 
and Mrs. Jake Fleek. 

People of this community are 
glad to see the ice leave, after hav- 
ing it for a week. 

Mr. . nd Mrs. Douglas Daley are 
the proud parents of a baby boy, 
born December 30. ■ — 

B. E. Aylor called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Jake Fleek and family, Sun- 
day afternoon. 

George Dickerson spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Doug Daley 
and family. 

Miss Jean Fleek and Ida Mae 
Fleek spent Saturday night with 
Mr. and Mrs. Amual Hensley. 



Groger Now With Noel 

E. H. Groger, formerly E. H. 
Groger & Son, well known Kenton 
and Boone County business man 
is now connected with the Noel Co., 
of Covington. 

Mr. Groger operated a real estate 
office in Covington and Erlanger 
for a number of years. His son, 
Teddy Groger, is now serving his 
country ■ overseas with the U. J3. 
Marines. 

Mr. Groger has wide experience 
in home, farms and all types of 
real estate and comes to The Noel 
Company as manager of the real 
estate department. 

Mr. Noel will devote his time to 
his extensive insurance business 
and to his large farm that he re- 
cently purchased in Boone County. 

Both Mr. Groger and Mr.. Noel 
invite their many friends to drop 
in at 31 E. Seventh Street, Coving- 
ton, ky., to discuss any problems 
they may have on real estate or 
insurance. 



We wish everyone a very Prosp- 
erous and Happy New Tear. 
. The river is rising rapidly. 

Sorry to hear of the Illness of 
Mrs. Birdie Rector. Her daughter 
and family have been at her bed- 
side. We wish for her a speedy re- 
covery. 

Russell Stephens and family, of 
Illinois are enjoying a visit with 
relatives here. 

The various Christmas programs 
■Were well attended. 

Miss Dorothy Delph has been 
visiting her grandparents Mr. and 
Mrs. James Feely, of Petersburg; 
this week. 

Robt. Smith returned home Fri- 
day after spending several weeks 
with his son Pvt. Jimmie Smith in 
Texas. — — r 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Smith are re- 
siding with their daughter, Mrs. 
Marie West and husband In Mc- 
Ville. 



Total "receipts for the home- 
makers' market in Christian coun- 
ty the past year were $7,180. 



Bangs Test For Carte 
Now Available For 
Boone County Stock 

Dr. B. F. Pigg, State Veterinar- 
ian, Division of livestock Sanita- 
tion, Department of Agriculture, 
Frankfort advised 'the Cdunty 
Agent's office the past week that 
the Federal-State Bangs disease 
test is now available to farmers. 
Those farmers desiring their herds 
tested should make application to 
Dr. Pigg. ^ 

Bangs test except by private 
veterinarians, has not been avail- 
able for several months. There 
have been many requests during 
this period. 

Two important Bangs tests are 
available, one the old "Test and 
Slaughter" plan and the other the 
calf hood vaccination program. The 
later program is principally for 
those who want to build up an 
immune herd keeping the old in- 
fected cows until immune heifers 
are grown for replacements. 



Cooked A Fine Dinner; 
Then Threw It To Dog 



One lady recently stated that she 
used to throw her own dinner to 
the dog most of the time. It made 
her sick just to look at anything to 
eat. She was swollen with gas, full 
of bloat, had headaches, felt worn 
out and was badly constipated. 
Finally she got ERB-HELP and 
says she now eats everything in 
sight and digests it perfectly. 
Bowels are regular and normal. 
She is enjoying life once more and 
feels like "some other woman since 
taking this New Compound. 

ERB-HELP contans 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable people 
soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! G< 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dix 
Highway. 



COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
47 Dixie Highway -:- Erlanger, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

MORTON SUGAR CURE - TENDER QUICK 

MEAT PUMPS - SAUSAGE SEASONING 



Used Cars 

MANY ARE GUARANTEED! 
'42 PACKARD CLIPPER (priority 

'40 DODGE TUDOR 963.00 

'37 BUICK SEDAN 500.00 

'33 PLYMOUTH COUPE 175.00 

.'36 CHEVROLET PANEL TRUCK... 255.00 

'38 OLDSMOBILE 4-DOOR TRUNK 

. SEDAN :.......: 650.00 

'37 OLDSMOBILE CLUB COUPE 405.00 

needed) 1850.00 

'36 DODGE COUPE 350.00 

'34 NASH SEDAN 150.00 

'37 TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 




■M 



HAMILTON 




j i 






Sell Your 



With Friends 



MARSHALL-HARRIS 
TORACCO WAREHOUSE CO. 



This scribe wishes the edito 
all Recorder readers a Ha; 
Prosperous New Year. / 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett Jones were Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd Stephens and children, Mr. 
and Mrs. Raymond Shields and 
children, Mrs. Marie Bowen and 
Mrs. Alice Johanneman. 

Tom Ross passed away at St. 
Elizabeth Hospital Friday evening 
from heart trouble. Funeral ser- 
vices were held at Big Bone church 
Tuesday at 2:30. Sympathy is ex- 
tended to hiS wife and children. 

The Ohio River to climbing its 
banks at this writing. 

m/ and Mrs. Lewis Ryle spent 
Christmas Day with relatives in 

Latonia. 



\eepmtf 

Wawihf Tower 

JJwftHf 







HENRY COUNTY 



EIGHTH STREET 



Warehouse 



Warehouse 



CARROLLTON, KENTUCKY 



Covington Druggist 

Moves To Boone County 

The Recorder welcomes to our 
community M. C. Owens, who for 
many years has operated a drug 
store« at Pike and Washington 



Every year since the war began, more and „ 
more power for war production has been *"" 
supplied by this company. 

During 1944, we delivered more power for 
wartime industrial and military use alone 
than we deHverecWor*// purposes in any 
one year prior to 1941. 

Today, with approximately three-fifths of 
our entire output going into the task, sup- 
plying the energy for producing die raw 
materials and finished products of war is 
more than ever our No. 1 job and will re- 
main so for the duration. 

• Until victory is won, employees of this com* 
pany will stay at "battl* stations"— on the 
lines and in the power plants — keeping 
war-vital power flowing to back the attack. 



4 






ELECTRIC 
POWER 



FIGHTING 
POWER. 

1 J> ' ■ 



• 



• 



Don't wane electricity fait b»- 
cause it's cheap and isn't ra- 
tion- ■' Use v/b-t you need, but 

nc.'.l \ !ut • ou >::i. . 



.C 



StreetsTtJovlhgton. 

Mr. Owens, who formerly lived in j 
Park Hills, recently moved to a! 
farm he purchased* on Route 1, 
Union, but will continue to oper- 
ate his drug store. As a "farmer," 
Mr. Owens is starting right, by 
subscribing for The Recorder. 



i 



1 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



v 






I 



UMHIII 

fs&nAnd 




IB BOONI COUNT* RECORDER, BUMJNGTON, KENTUCKY 



— ■ 



rd Around 
The County Seat 



^nuinniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinHmniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiuiiiHnu 

Mrs. Kirtley Cropper was 111 sev- 



eral days this week. 



Rev. O. B. Thomas visited rela- 
tives near Georgetown, Sunday. 



Bert Gaines has been ill for the 
past few weeks. 



Mr. and Mrs. Irvln Rouse and 
family spent Christmas Day with 
Mr. and Mrs. Les Barlow and fam- 
ily and Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Rouse, 
of Union. 



Miss Ruby Cotton, of Latonla, 
was a dinner guest Saturday even- 
of Miss Carolyn Cropper. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lee Buey were the 
guests Christmas Day of Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Green, of Union. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Jones visit- 
ed their daughter in Cincinnati, 
several days during the holidays. 




m William Jarrell and daugh- 
Lynnette visited Mr. and Mrs, 
Mlddendorf, last week. 



and Mrs. Lloyd Weaver and 
were dinner guests Wednesday 
ing of Mrs. Ettle Weaver. 



Iss Betty Lou Kelly, of Louis- 
spent the holidays with her 
i nts, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Kelly. 




icrease 



OUR CAPITAL STRUCTURE NOW IS: 



........... • • . • • ■ 



-S 50,000.00 
. 150,000.00 



Capital 
Surplus 
Undivided Profits 19,576.04 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 

/ " 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

* Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00 

^XHZHZHZHZnZHZHXMXHXHZHXHZHXHXHXHZHZHXHXHZHZHXHZHXHZI 



mmjMMmsmpimmPMMMMim 




ENLISTS FOR ACTSVE SERVICE 



The women of America have answered the call 
to active service. You'll find them wherever 
there's work to be done. Their pretty, capable 
hands plot the courses of enemy planes . . . roll 
bandages . . . administer First Aid . !. . drive am- 
bulances . . . but their nails are bright, brave 
red I Working in war inclusjp'ies or planning 
.^vitamin-studded meals, the women of America 
have shown themselves ready to meet any em- 
ergency ... and able to stay downright pretty 
through it all I 

Plan YOUR beauty care to suit your active war- 
time life. Have a really fine permanent to save 
Erecious time ... a versatile short coiffure for 
usiness-like days and star-spangled evenings. 
For your own morale . . . for the inspiration of 
your men in service . . . be as alert and smart and 
beautiful as ever! This is part of your war job. 

La Rose Beauty Salon 

.400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252 — Virginia Collins, Prop. 



;r kYv. »w lYV W< »yy »vY'»WaW»V?»w»v/ »Y/.»W»WkS<Y.»vv »w »w»Vv tv/fcVy M >v*>Wiiw 



Mr\ and Mrs. Earl Locke and 
Mrs. "Brace Bowman were dinner 
guests Sunday of Mrs. Clara Black. 






Rev. R. A. Johnson, W. L. Crop- 
per, Howard Llzer, Klza Poston and 
Virgil Vice attended the ordination 
of R*v. Henry Holladay at Bullitts- 
burg Baptist Church, Sunday aft- 
ernolon. ' 



Mrs. Ella Hawes, of Covington, 
spent. last week with Miss Mayme 
Hawes. 



Miss Corlnne and Junior Walton 
spent several days with their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Huey. 



Floyd^Hrraiis of Athens, Ohio, 
spent Christmas Eve with Mr. and 
Mrs. George Walton and family. 



Mrs. Helen Snyder spent the 
Christmas week-end with friends 
in Detroit, Mich. 



Miss Mary Alice Poston enter- 
tained a group of her friends with 
a party, Saturday night. 



Mrs. Minnie Carpenter left re- 
cently to spend the winter months 
with Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Gaines, of 
Walton. 



Dr. and Mrs. L. E. Rouse, of Lud- 
low and Miss Mary Belle Smith, 
visited Mr. and Mrs. George Porter 
and son, Sunday. _ 



Mr. and Mrs. Will Carpenter were 
Christmas Day guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Denzil Carpenter and daugh- 
ter, of Cincinnati. 



Prof, and Mrs. James R. Huey 
and two sons from Rockfield spent 
the holidays with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. S. Huey. 



Mr. and Mrs. Will Sebree enter- 
tained their children Christmas 
Day. Mrs. Hildreth Dolwick was 
also a guest at the Sebree home. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lehman Hambrlck 
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Morris 
Beard and Mrs. Emma Hambrlck* 
of Florence were Christmas Day 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ted Ham- 
brick and daughter. 



Service Roll Call To 
Be Held At Christian 
Chorch, BaHrttsvHIe 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kelly and 
Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Yelton and 
family entertained Dr. and Mrs. M. 
A. Yelton, Mrs. Alvln Clore and 
children and Mr. and Mrs. Elza 
Poston and family, Christmas Day. 



Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Maurer and daughter Christmas 
Day were Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Maurer and son Edgar Maurer, 
Mrs. Josie Maurer, Mr. and Mrs. 
Carl Mlddendorf of Cincinnati and 
Mr. and Mrs. Grover Jarrell. 



Dr. and Mrs. M. A. Yelton and 
daughter Geraldlne, entertained 
Miss Jean Foltzer, of Cincinnati, 
and Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Yelton 
and family at dinner, Thursday 
night. 

Christmas Eve dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Eddins were Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Kelly and daugh- 
ter Ruth» Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kel- 
ly Clore, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Utz 
and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pollard and 
children. i 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kelly en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Courtney 
Kelly and family, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dean Stanley, of Lebanon, Ohio, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Eddins and Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Kelly Clore, of 
Lexington, Christmas Day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Combs 
and son spent the Christmas 
week-end with relatives in Gratz 
and Jonesville. 



Walton Smith, son of Rev. and 
Mrs. W. M. Emith and his wife, 
Bettye, are the proud parents of 
a son, named Gregory Walton. 



Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin and 
family were guests Christmas Day, 
of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Akin and 
daughter Elva. 



Cpl. Marvin Rouse Porter, of 
Langley Field, Virginia, is spending 
a furlough with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Porter. 



Cpl. James Gayle Smith, of To- 
peka, Kans., recently spent a fur- 
lough with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Earl Smith. 



Lt. and Mrs. Harry Holtzclaw and 
family called on relatives here, on 
Sunday. Lt. Holtzclaw is being 
transferred to Texas. 



Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Weaver and 
son were guests Christmas Day of 
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Beemon and 
daughter. 



The Home Store 

UlllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllilUllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIISMMIII 



Mr. and Mrs. Lance Smith, of 
Belleview, are the proud 'parents of 
an eight and one-half pound son, 
born Monday, January 1st. 



Mrs. Manley Ryle spent Tuesday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Will Sebree. We 
are glad to know that Mrs. Ryle is 
able to be out, after being confin- 
ed to her home for sometime, due 
to a fall. 



NOTICE 



The Frozen Food Locker Plantf 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



The young men and women of 
the Bullittsville Church have an- 
swered the call to the colors to 
such an extent that It la hard for 
the church to carry on' in its usual 
manner, but we would not have 
lt otherwise. If the church has In- 
stilled in these young people Chris- 
tian ideals and a patriotism for 
which they are ready and wining 
to risk their lives, the church feels 
that its labors have not been In 
vain. 

Our pastor has suggested that on 
Sunday, January 14th at the reg- 
ular church service someone from 
the families of each of the follow- 
ing service men and women- be 
present for the roll calL . Do this 
for them: 

John I. Anderson, marines; Mur- 
rell Birkle, navy; Theo Blrkle, Jr., 
navy; George R. Beacom, navy; 
James E. Beacom, navy; James G. 
Bullock, army, Robert S. Garnett, 
army; Miles Goodridge, army; 
Lehman Hollis, army; Herman B. 
Jaber, army; Charles Johnson; 
Allen S. Kenyon, army; Melvin L. 
Kenyon, army; Howard S. Ledford, 
army; David A. Lucas, army; Bern- 
ard Lee Marshall, army; Robert W. 
Marshall, army; Loralne Reimer, 
army; George H. Riley, navy; Har- 
old R. Williams, army; Mauriee- E. 
Willis, army; Mary L. Marshall, 
cadet nurse; Katherine Souther, 
cadet nurse. 

We have four young men re- 
maining, of whom two have been 
rejected, one has Just become of 
military age, and one a full fledg- 
ed farmer, about which there is 
no question. ■ 

This is a dark hour for our 
church in so far as carrying on a 
young people's program is con- 
cerned but our faithful young 
folks not in the service are doing 
a* wonderful work. 

Let us remember that, when 
Christ hung on the cross it was a 
dark hour for his followers. Since 
jlit .is always darkest just before 
J/dawn let us hope and pray that 
our young people may all return 
and report MISSION ACCOM- 
PLISHED and take their places in 
our homes, church and community 
life. If some do not return, but 
must make the supreme sacrifice, 
let us see to it that they shall not 
have died .in vain. 

—Bullittsville Christian Church. 



ens are the guests of then* grand- 
mother, Mrs. Rfsa Stevens. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cam White and 
Mrs. Pauline Ryle visited Mr. and 
Mrs. Harold White at Us camp In 
Virginia. 

We welcome Mr. and Mr». Jones 
and daughter to our iuiIjUmhImw 
The Jones have purchased the Wal- 
ton property here. 

Mrs. Ernest Brown suffered In- 
juries when she fell on the ke Fri- 
day. 1 

The Rowland boys purchased a 
car from Walter Buckler last week. 

Mr, ami Mrs. Jeff Eddins and 
children spent Christmas with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs Willie Press- 
er. * 




Florence Youth 






Training At Great Lakes 



John P. Crouch, Jr., 17, son of 
Mrs. Helen M. Crouch, Florence, Is 
receiving his initial Naval indoct- 
rination at the 17. S. Naval Train- 
ing Center, Great Lakes, Illinois. 

His recruit training consists of 
instruction in seamanship, military 
drill, and general Naval procedure. 
During this period a series of apti- 
tude tests will be taken by the re- 
cruit to determine whether he will 
be assigned to a Naval Service 
School, to a shore station or to Im- 
mediate duty at sea. 

-When his recruit training^ comr 
pleted, the seaman will receive a 
period of leave. 



Roy Caudill, 14, a 4-H Club boy 
in Lee county, produced 923 sticks 
of tobacco on one acre after using 
a complete fertilizer and manure 
on a cover crop. 



City, fla^-CpL Hoard 
Martin has been graduated freaa 
the Army Air Forces Flexible Gun- 
nery School as Tyndell Field, 
of the largess senecls of Ms 
In th* Ar«*y *♦» 
Command. 

Upon his graduation. Che 
received a pair of 
signifying that now he Is 
take his place «a a 
combat crew of an AAF bomber 



At the gunnery school, be 
trained in the operation of JO and 
.50 calibre machine guns, first on 
ground ranges and later in the 
air, learning by simulated aerial 
battle conditions how to blast en- 
emy fighter planes from the akf. 

As an aerial gunner he win join 
thousands of his "teammates of 
the sky," carrying the attack to 
the enemy in all parts of the world 
as guardians of America's ' heavy 
and medium bombers. 

He Is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. 

W. Martin who reside at Russell St, 
in Florence, Ky. 



LANDSCAPING SCHOOL 

GROUNDS 

Members of homemakers' clubs 
are cooperating with parent-teach- 
ers associations in a long-time 
program of landscaping school 
grounds in Boyd county. About 
$250 was spent this year in set- 
ting trees and shrubbery. Prof. N, 
R. Elliott of the Kentucky CoUegt~\ 
of Agriculture and Home Econ- x 
omics is acting in an advisory cap- 
acity. 



Mrs. Lavina Kirkpatrick enter- 
tained Christmas Day with a fam- 
ily dinner, Mr. and Mrs. D. Reese 
and children, Mrs. Lucy Albeiz, 
Katherine Kirkpatrick of Walnut 
Hills, and Calvert KirkDatrick of 
Ludlow. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. L. McBee, Judge 
and Mrs. C. L. Cropper and 
daughter, Miss Ruby Cotton, of 
Latonia, Miss Lucile Cotton. Wilt- 
on Stephens, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Pete Stephens attended a party at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Conner and son, of Hebron, Satur- 
day night. 



Mr. and Mrs. Galen Kelly spent 
Christmas Day with Dr. and Mrs. 
O. E. Senour and daughter, of Er- 
langer. 



WAR BONDS 



LADIES 4-PIECE DRESSER SETS $5.99 

LADIES' 5-PIECE DRESSER SETS k 15.03 

LADIES 3-PIECE DRESSER SETS -V. .$1.03 

CARDINAL COLOGNE and TALC SET, 4 pieces 59c 

3-PIECE TANGEE POWDER, ROUGE, LIPSTICK 30c 

3-PIECE TANGEE SET in Leather ease $1.55 

SOAP AND BATH CRYSTALS SET, 5-plees ...35c 

LADIES COMPACTS $1.31 and $1JB0' 

SERVICE PINS » . .47c* 

LADIES' BOXED HANDKERCHIEFS 59c 

LEATHER BILLFOLDS 98c, $2.09 and $1.59 

^lEN'S SHAVE POWDER and LOTION SET 79c, 99, $2.19 

BABY RATTLERS 50c 

LADIES' NOVELTY PINS $1.00 

LUMINOUS PICTURES that Glows in Dark. $1.00 

LEATHER TOY ANIMALS $1.00 and $1.59 

LADIES' HOUSE SHOES .....' 98c 

CHILDREN'S APRONS 25c 

LADIES SLIPOVER SWEATERS, 109 percent wool.. 2^49 and 3.98 

PICTURE FRAMES $1.00, 89c and $1.39 

BABY BOOKS . . . .* * . . $1.00 

BLACK MAMA DOLL $1.89 

WOODEN DOLL BED WITH PAD v „ . . .$325 

WOODEN JEEPS r .$1J89 

PAINT SET 59c 

CHECKER SET 10c 

RAGGEDY ANN and ANDY BOOK 1.19 

CONCORD ROCKING ANIMALS 50c 

SEWING SET 30c 

TOY SOLDIERS Set of 60 . . 25c 

NAVAL PATROL SET Includes 24-inch Destroyer 25s 

MAGIC BUBBLE WAND 25c 

LADIES HOSE . - .. . 98c 

MEN'S DRESS SOX 25c, 30c and 35c 



Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Ryle, of 
Louisville, Rev. Elmore Ryle and 
Mrs. William Huey spent Christ- 
mas Day with their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Manley Ryle. 



Miss Addie L. Norman of Coving- 
ton, is among The Recorder's new 
subscribers for the new year. Miss 
Norman, who is a native of Boone 
County, having formerly lived In 
Florence, says she feels as thoujgh 
she cannot do without The Record- 
er. Miss Norman has been em- 
ployed by Coppln's department 
store, Covington for many years. 



WATERLOO 



Mr. and Mrs. W. L. McBee and 
son and Miss Lucile Cotton spent 
Christmas Day with Mr. and Mrs. 
W. B. Cotton and daughter, of 
Latonia. 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brown and 
children Bobby and June enter- 
tained with a family breakfast 
Christmas morning, the following: 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Huey, Mr and 
Mrs. Earle Smith, Judge and Mrs. 
C. L. Cropper, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. 
Stephens, Carolyn Cropper, Joe 
Smith and the honored guest, Cpl. 
James G. Smith, who was here for 
the holidays from Topeka, Kans. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Rouse and j 
Mr. and Mrs. Dudley Rouse and 
children spent Sunday before 
Christmas with Miss Alta Rouse, 
of Cincinnati. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith moved 
last week to the home which they 
recently purchased and was form- 
erly occupied by Mr. and Mrs. 
Claude Patterson and family. 



- 



NEW ORLEANS MOLASSES 35c qt., gal. $1.25 



I 



GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Miss Mary Belle Smith of George- 
town College returned home this 
week to spend the holidays with 
her parents, Rev. and Mrs. Wm. 
Smith. 



GOSPEL TEAM ENTERTAINED 

The R. A. gospel team was enter- 
tamed with a dinner at the Gib- 
son Hotel on December 21 by their 
leader R. M. Andreas. Joe Smith, H. 
R. Forkner, John Cropper. Jimmy 
Ryle, Bob Brown, Phillip Yelton 
and Bill McBee are members from 
the local Baptist Church, who en- 
joyed the occasion. 



Mrs. Kirb Conner left Sunday) 
morning to be with her daughter, 
who has recently undergone an 
operation in Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rector spent 
Sunday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Brown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Allen en- 
tertained their nephews over the 
week-end. 

Mr., and Mrs. Robt. Wells were 
Christmas holiday guests of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Roy William- 
son. 

W. J. Newhall and Grace San- 
ford were Christmas dinner guests 
of his sister, Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Craven, of Covington. 

Miss Corrine Walton is spending 
the holidays with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Walton. The Wal- 
tons were Christmas dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs-. Willie Huey. 

Sis and Loreth Rector were Sat- 
urday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Rector. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cook visited 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Cook one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hood spent 
Friday and Saturday of last week 
with their relatives here. 

Henry Mallicoat called on his 
son Kermit and family, Saturday. 

Doha Grace and Wanda Stev 



BURLINGTON P.-T. A 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the Burlington P.-T. A. will be held 
on Monday night, January 8 at 
7:30 p. m. at the schoolhouse 



W. "L. | s Cropper and daughter 
Mary Bess and Mrs. Lizzie Duncan 
were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Kirtley Cropper and family Christ- 
mas Day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Eddins and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Maurer and son were dinner guests 
Thursday evening of Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Kelly. 



Miss Betty Jean Forkner, who is 
attending school at the University 
of Kentucky spent the holidays 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
R. Torkner. 



Harold Johnson, son of Rev. and 
Mrs. R. A. Johnson, is rapidly re- 
covering from Injuries which he 
received in an automobile accident 
near Tucson, Arizona, several 
weeks ago. 

/ 



Celebrates 83rd Birthday 

Samuel B. Setters and- family of 
Union entertained Sunday, Dec. 17 
in honor of his mother's 83rd 
birthday. Those present to enjoy 
the occasion were: Mrs. Martha 
Jane Setters, the honor guest, 
Charles Feldhaus and family, Mrs. 
Grace Feldhaus, Joe Setters and 
wife, George Setters and family, 
Dorothy Setters, John Feldhaus, 
"Paul Setters and family, Mitchell 
Kite and family. 

AJ1 left at a late hour wishing 
Mrs. Setters many more happy 
birthdays. She has ten grandsons 
and two great grandsons in the 
service of our country. 



In Anderson county, 183 home- 
makers reported canning 38,500 
quarts of vegetables, 27,232 quarts 
of fruit and 5,532 quarts of meat 
this year. 




Old Pictures 

Bring them to us for copies 
or enlargement. Many, many 
times results are surprisingly 
good. 

When in the studio, have 
photographs made of your- 
self and members of the fam- 
ily. Your friends will treasure 
them, you may be assured. 



STEVENS 




804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 

1 



UBIKO FEEDS 

HAY - STRAW - SALT - FIELD SEEDS - FLOUR 
ELECTRIC WIRING and SUPPLIES 

Raymond Gross, Prop. 

Florence, Ky. Phone 106 




wmmmm 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

icEOCSETTco. 



{&£ u 



DIXIE HIGHWAY at Graves 

y EHLMGER 

'•' ft N A G E r\ : G E k G E * '■' '. 



Suburban jewelers exclusively 
with modern stores in ■ 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD • M AOISONVILLE 



/ lYv »W »W »vv »Y-< »vv »Y'i »W»Vv »»"r »v/ ».v »Yi • 



VISIT 



DIXIE DRY GOODS 

NEW GOODS ARRIVING DAILY 



LATEST ARRIVALS: 



BOYS' RAINCOATS > 

ONE-PIECE INFANTS 

snow suits, i to 4 ..; 

A BIG SELECTION OF INFANTS' 
AND CHILDREN'S GLOVES 35c to 

LADIES' RAYON and COTTON $1 .98 

TON SWEATERS. 34 to 40 * 

SS DRESSES, Cotton $2.98 - $3.98 

RAYbN PRINT ...; $4.98 

CHILDREN'S COTTON $f .98 - $>i.98 

SPUN DRESSES .,.„, 

LADIES' CHENILLE ROBES 
All colors and sizes 

LADIES' PRINT and SUMMER 
HOUSE COATS ^ 

36-INCH OUTING, plain and fancy. .....yd. 25c 

36-INCH UNBLEACHED MUSLIN ...19c - 22c 

MEN'S GRAY FLANNEL SHIRTS 
Sizes 14 to 19 .... 













IVUmSDAT, lANfJABY €, IMS 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF DECEMBER 21, 1924 



_*- 



Mrs. May Tanner and Mrs. W. N. 
Utc and children spent Tuesday 
■ I teruwu with their mother. Mrs. 
Sara Brown. 

Mrs. Homer Jones was taken to 
Christ Hospital* where she was op- 
erated on for appendicitis. 
Pt. Pleasant 

Miss Lillian Goodridge entertain- 
ed her many friends at her home 



W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

O^OMETRIST 



Specializing: in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 




27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



WANTED! 

AD kinds of Band Instru- 
ments — Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxa phones; 
etc 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 

540 Madison HE. 7413 



here one night last week. 

Miss Ruth Eggleston spent the 
week-end with Miss Vlrgie Gross. 
Hebron 

Edwin Walton : and sister enter- 
tained a few of their friends with 
a party one night last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Acra had as 
guests last Saturday night, his 
brother Edgar and bride. 
Beaver Lick 

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Griffith and 
Mr. R. E. Moore, are expecting to 
leave for Florida about the 10th of 
January. 

Albert Booth (colored) who was 
operated on for appendicitis is do- 
ing fine and Is expected home in 
a few days. 

Gunpowder 

Ezra Blankenbeker and wife and 
George Barlow and wife left last 
Sunday for Florida, where they ex- 
pect to spend the winter. 

Shelby Aylor is recovering from 
a severe case of mumps. ' 
Verona 

E. V. Roberts and sister, Miss Eva 
vLsited relatives here last Thurs- 
day. 

Mrs. C. H. Finnell, who had a 
paralytic stroke some weeks ago, 
is improving nicely. 

Hopeful 

Miss Charlotte Bradford had as 
her week-end guests, her friend, 
Miss Iva Presser, of near Union. 

Mrs. Annie Beemon and family, 
T. H. Easton and wife and Everett 
Hayes spent Sunday with Harry 
Dinn and wife, of Hebron. 
Lovers' Lane 

Misses Minnie, Laura Bell Ab- 
don and brother Wilbur, spent the 
first of the week with Mr. Jones. 

Misses Beulah and' Fannie Smith 
spent one night last week with 
friends in" Covington. 
Petersburg 

Mr. and Mrs. waiter Gaines and 
daughter Dorothy Ann were Sun- 
day guests of Mr. and Mrs. William 



Hensley. 

David Pearce, of Cincinnati, was 
the guest of Mr. Norris Berkshire, 
Friday and Saturday. 

Rabbit Hash 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
Ryle, December 20th, a six pound 
girl. 

Mrs. Hubert Clore and children, 
Paul Laverne and Zekna, visited 
her parents, L. L. Stephens and 
wife, last Saturday. 
Florence 

Mrs. G. B. Miller and daughter 
Helen, -were week-e nd g uests of 
her daughter, Mrs. J. S. Poer, of 
Covington. 

Little Cornelius Reagan, of Price 
Pike is visiting his cousin, Helen 
Cooper, of Ft. Mitchell. 
Richwood 

F. B. Youell, of Covington, spent 
Sunday at Frank Youell's. 

Eldridge Carpenter was appoint- 
ed administrator of the late T. E. 
Dixon estate. 

Belleview 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Rogers and 
sons spent Sunday with Prof. Hook 
and wife, of Burlington. 
Burlington 

Melvin Jones and wife, of Flor- 
ence, spent Christmas Day with J. 
G. Smith and family. 

J. J. Kirkpatrick and N. E. Rid- 
dell purchased the radio and equip- 
ment last Friday that will be given 
away in The Recorder circulation 
campaign. It is now on exhibition 
at D. R. Blythe's store. 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important before winter. 
FREE CHECKING 

Welding Co. 

Covington, Ky. 



R. 

722 Washington St. 



HXNXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXriXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHZU-rr^H£ 

HEATING STOVES AND STOVE PIPE 



JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY 

DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES 

DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS 

Louden Dairy Barn Stalls-Stanchions 

Meyers Pumps and Water Systems 

FARM FENCING AND GATES 
NO RATIONING OF FARM MACHINERY 

The Jansen Hardware Co. 

CO. 0910 108-110 PIKE ST. COVINGTON, KY. 

IXHZMZMXHSMXM^HXHSMZHXIIXHZHZHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXMS 



H 

X 
N 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
H 



PRICE MINIMUM 

PLACED ON EGGS 

The minimum producer price for 
candled eggs in 1945 will be 27 
cents per dozen, Gavin S. Dudley, 
district representative of the War 
jFood Administration's Office, of 
Distribution, Lexington, Kentucky, 
said this week. This price will be 
supported by purchases from deal- 
ers upon certification that they in 
turn have paid no less than the 
support price to producers. 

For "straight-run" eggs, in areas 
where marketing facilities for pur- 
chasing candled eggs from produc- 
ers cannot be made available, the 
support price will be 24 cents per 
dozen. Purchasing agents will be 
designated in all areas prior to the 
beginning of the heavy egg season, 
and WFA will stand ready to pur- 
chase eggs from farmers at all 
times. It is, hoped, however, Dud- 
ley said, that facilities for cand- 
ling can be provided in all sections. 

To avoid storage and transporta- 
tion difficulties encountered in 

1944, due to the poor condition of 
shipping cases and packing mater- 
ials, WFA will buy only eggs pack- 
ed in good used cases, complete 
with tops, or in new fiber cases. 

Purchases of dried and frozen 
eggs will be correlated with the 
purchase of shell eggs for price 
support purposes. In this way all 
sections of the country can be cov- 
ered. 

As to the demand for eggs in 

1945, Dudley said WFA will have 
need for substantial quantities of 
high grade eggs to meet export re- 
quirements. The Armed Forces 
will also be purchasing eggs of a 
high quality. Altogether, domestic 
demand for graded eggs, and de- 
mand for governmental agencies 
can be expected to maintain usual 
grade differentials in price, Dudley 
concluded. 



Hour 
Eyes 



W 



m 



10% of all headaches are due 
to eye trouble. Correct glasses 
usually give relief by . reliev- 
ing eyestrain. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0790 



(Don't Say - - 

"KT FEET ARE KILLING ME" 

DO SOMETHING 
ABOUT IT. 

DO THIS TOMORROW SURE I 

I No matter how many Arch Sup-j 

ports or whatever kind of Shoesl 

you were disappointed in time| 
I after time— - * . 

Go To People's 

LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT 
YOUR FEET 

lit Cost's You Nothingl 

1 WE HELPED THOUSANDS— 
WE CAN HELP YOU 

iThree Foot Comfort Specialists! 
I (Specially Schooled) will give youl 
la' FREE' Honest Analysis on Yourl 
iFeet. Learn the Truth about Yourl 
I Feet— The whole truth. I 

Don't suffer Another Day—Put Your Feet In Our Hands 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 



iiiiiniiitiimmiiiiiirmiiiiitrniiniiiiiiim 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

iimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimii 

Cpl. David A. Lucas, Co. C. 90th 
Cml. Bn. (MTZ) Camp Swift, 
Texas, writes: 

"I want to thank you again for 
sending me The Recorder. I have 
not missed a copy in over two years. 

"I really enjoy reading the news, 
and the whereabouts- of" friends. 
Also want to let you know of my 
change of address, and if you will 
continue to send The Recorder I 
will thank you very much." 

• * • 

The* following letter was' written 
by Cpl. Samuel B. Walton, APO 63, 
care Postmaster, N. Y., to his 
mother: 

"I received your letter a few days 
ago, sure glad to hear from you 
and that all of you are well and in 
good health. I am feeling fine at 
this writing. I have been going to 
town and have seen a lot of good 
shows. 

"This is a pretty nice town. I 
don't know when I will be out of 
the hospital, I am still taking 
treatment for my arm and it's get- 
ting lots better. ' 

"I received the telegram you 
sent this morning. I guess you 
will have a nice Christmas this 
year. I guess I will celebrate an- 
other Christmas over the pond. We 
will have a nice Christmas over 
here this year. 

"I hope by next year I will cel- 
ebrate in the U. S. Tell all of the 
folks I said hello, and drop a line 
in their spare lme if they aren't 
too busy." 

A brother of Samuel, William B. 
Walton is stationed somewhere in 
Germany. He writes that he Is well 
and extends greeting to everyone. 
He has been in the service four 
years, being stationed overseas two 
years. 

• * * 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Lt. James' L. Aylor 
stationed somewhere in Germany: 

"Thought I would take this op- 
portunity to write you and let you 
know that I'm alright and to wish 
you a Merry Xmas and a very 
Prosperous New Year. 

"The 'hunting season' Is in full 
swing over here. Very good hunt- 
ing, too— Jerries everywhere. How- 
ever, some of them resent the fact 
and sometimes cause the hunting 
to be rather warm. 

"I have not been fortunate 
enough to meet with any Boone 
County fellows as yet. I hope to, 
though, as we surely would get to- 
gether for a grand old bull session. 

"I am enclosing a Christmas 
card that I was able to pick up — 
isn't much, but the thought is 
there. ^ 

"Sure hope this mess soon ends 
but would be afraid to try and 



guess when. Too many people have 
been fooled already. 

"We have lots of nice, clean mud 
to wade In and sleep in. However, 
at times, it's surprising just how 
good that cold mud can feel— you 
can't seem to get deep enough in 
it. 

"One of the boys In my platoon 
told me his girl friend wanted to 
know if he believed in prayer. He 
wrote back that since he had been 
over here he had said so many it 
would take her 10 years to catch 
up with him. 

"Give my regards to the Boone 
County people. Hoping for a quick 
victory." 

• • * 

Pfc. George Louden? stationed in 
New/ Qulnea.Nvrites : 

"I suppose you will be surprised 
to hear from me, as I should have 
written, but time is spent pretty 
rapidly here! One harly gets time 
to write at all. I just want to thank 
everybody for all the nice Christ- 
mas boxes they have sent to me, 
and I want to thank you for the 
papers. 

"I just received 3 copies at noon 
today, and I just had to glance 
over them before I went to chow. 
I have seen several boys from 
home since I have been across. I 
just returned from the Red Cross, 
where they give out doughnuts 
three times weekly, and cold Coca- 
Cola every night. 

"I wish you at home could see 
what a wonderful job they are do- 
ing to help our morale out here. 

"I suppose I had better stop now 
and go to bed. I will say again, 
thank everybody for the nice»boxes 
they have sent me, and hoping I 
will get to see you all in the near 
future.. Tell everybody hello." 

• • * 

PROMOTED TO RANK 
„ OF- CAPTAIN IN NEW GUINEA 

Somewhere in New Guinea — 
Worth C. Conner, has been - pro- 
moted to Captain in the Coast Art- 
illery. He Is a graduate of Officers 
Candidate School at Fort Monroe, 
Va. 

Captain Conner departed for 
overseas in June 1943, and has 
been stationed on Fiji, Savo, Guad- 
alcanal and New Caledonia. 

The Captain has two brothers 
in the service, Tech. Sgt. Ivan K., 
who is somewhere in England, and 
another brother Staff Sgt. John E. 
in the Marines, and who has also 
seen overseas service. 

They are the grandsons of Mr. 
Nathan Clements and the nephews 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Rice and 
Mr. Ivan Clements of Boone Coun- 
ty. . 

• • • 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Mrs. Alva Dickerson 
mother of Pvt. Harry O. Dickerson: 

"Received a letter from Harry 
Glenn Dickerson, now stationed Jn 



NEW YEAR'S 
GREETING! 



That the new year has 
dawned brightly for you ; 
that it will be the best 
of all the years you've 
ever known, and that 
peace and understand- 
ing soon will come to_ 
the troubled world, is 
the wish of 



YSON 
MOT CH 

THE JCWGLCRS 

613 15 MADISON SV, COVINGTON 
SINCC 4667 



"Wheie Foot Comfort Begins" 



814-816 Madison Ave. 



Covington, Kentucky 



JUST RELEASED! 

HEAVY CAST ALUMINUM 

2-qt. Sauce Pan 

10 Vi -INCH FRYING 
PAN 



7-PC. CUTLERY SET 

Stainless steel; 7 different $«]%.95 
type knives with holder; all ^y 

PAT'S CHINA STORE 

Also Location of 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 Madison Cov. HE. 4988 



ALUMINUM PAINT 

Dutch Standard chrom- $4 
atic Aluminum Paint . . a 



"Red Hot" Aluminum for %*\ .75 



furnaces, heater 



GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



Germany, saying he had never re- 
ceived a copy of the dear old Re- 
corder. Will give you his address 
as to where he is now stationed. 
Would like for you to send him Thej 
Recorder If you possibly can as I 
know it would be like a letter, f roni 
home as many of the boys from 
home have letters published and I 
know he would enjoy them. 

"Please send him The Recorder 
to this address: Pvt. Harry O. 
Dickerson, 35078558, APO 104, caife 
Postmaster, New York, N. Y." 

Ed Note: The complete addreis 
as to Company and Infantry of 
Pvt. Dickerson must be omitted djie 
to government regulations. How- 
ever, by addressing mail to the 
above address it will reach Its des- 
tination. ■ . 



aDemc 



onstration Agent, Miss Gillas- 
pie, present. The meeting was 
opened by our president Mrs. Vera 
Dolwlck by the club singing "Jingle 
Bells" with salute to the flag and 
reading our club collect. After the 
business meeting a delicious din- 
ner was served and enjoyed by all. 
The afternoon was spent in play- 
ing games and exchanging of 
Christmas gifts. A most enjoyable 
day was spent by all. 

—Publicity Chairman. 



. A. W. HOPPER 



CONSTANCE HOMEMAKERS 

The December meeting and 
Christmas party was held%t the 
home of Mrs. Nell KottmySf^on 
December 6th. There were J19 
members, 5 visitors and our Home 



CHIROPRATIC PHYSICIAN 

I 

ADAMS BUILDING' 
433 Madison Avenue 
Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10-12 A. M, 2-5, 1-8 P. M. 
EXCEPT THURSDAYS AND SUN- 
DAYS. 

COlonlal 9544 



Plumbing - Heating - Electrical 

Electric WATER PUMPS, all typos, from 878.95 

Electric DOOR HELL, Quality make M 

Electric HOT WATER HEATER, Automatic 89 M 

American Beauty HtON CORDS 1.49 

Rittenhouse DOOR CHIMES 495 

9* Approved EXTENSION CORDS . .49 

Ivory Decorated BED LAMPS, metal 8.98 

30 Gal. Galv. HOT WATER BOILER 10.95 

LAUNDRY TRAYS, Twin Steel Reinforced 19.48 

TOILET TANK and BOWL, Brass fitting 19.95 

LAVITORY, Compact, Acid Resisting 9.95 

STEEL MEDICINE CABINET, 2 shelves 3.95 

STEEL TOWEL RACK, White only .35 

GAS RANGES, OIL STOVES, LAUNDRY STOVES from. . 5.95 

Large OIL SEWING LAMPS, Complete .75 

RUBBER SINK MATS, Black only ...". J8 

Large white STEW POTS 1.39 

2 AND 3 CELL FLASHLIGHTS, BATTERIES 49 

PIPE — VALVES — FITTINGS 

ROOFING — GUTTERS 

WINKLER STOKERS ON DISPLAY 

Biuegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) 
121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5788 



^1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 ! I ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 ■ i ii: 

I PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 

| COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

1 fATi 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation . . , . 

Ti 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 r i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ i ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ i 

I! 



Public Sale! 

HAVING BEEN DRAFTED INTO THE ARMED FORCES OF 
OUR COUNTRY, I AM FORCED TO DISPOSE OF MY EN- 
TIRE FARMING EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES, AT AUC- 
TION AT MY FARM LOCATED ON RICE PIKE, TWO MILES 
SOUTH OF UNION, KY., ON 



JAN. 6 



_ • BEGINNING AT 12:00 NOON 



~-7~ 



• 



FARM TOOLS— 1 wagon, 1 box bed, 1 hay frame; 1 sled, new; 
1 mowing machine; 1 hay rake; 1 disc harrow; one 60-tooth har- 
row; ;one 2-row^corn planter; 1 rounder plow;; 1 hillside plow; 
1 laying off plow; 2 double shovels; 1 five-plated cultivator; 1 
tractor; tractor plows; cutoff saw; 1 thirty-foot belt; 1 team 7- 
year-old mares; 1 filly; double set leather tug work, harness, 
new ; single set chain harness. , 

STOCK— Five shoats, weigh 75 lbs. each; 8 milch cows; 1 brown 
Swiss bull, 6 months old; 3 purebred Guernsey heifers. 

FEED— Three stacks of hay, one alfalfa, 2 timothy mixed; ap- 
proximately 200 bushels ear corn, 54 shocks in field. 

TERMS: CASH 

A. M. COATES 

OWNER 

COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



> 



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BOONE COUNT* RECORDER, BURLTNOTON, KENTUCKY 



tkursday. jabtjaky *, mm 



FLORENCE 

—■■■ — ■■■■ 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Wingate and 

daughters, of Covington and, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Schram and daugh- 
ter were Christmas dinner guests 
ol Mr. and Mrs. Russell Bethel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wiltord Ay lor and 
sons spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Owen Bethel. 

Deepest sympathy is extended to 
the Kottmyer family, of Constance 
in the death of their father. 

Miss Dorothy Middendorf, who 
arrived home the 16th to spend 
Christmas with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Victor Middendorf has 
returned to Washington, D. C. 
WhUfehere Miss Middendorf enjoy- 
ed a round of festivities in her 
honor. Sunday the lTth Mr. and 
Mrs. Alvin Pugh, of Oakley enter- 
tained at 6 o'clock dinner for her 
and Miss Pugh. Tuesday, Miss Jane 
Scherder entertained with a din- 
ner and theater party for her and 
on Wednesday Lt. and Mrs. John 
Seifrlend entertain with a lunch- 
eon. Saturday her parents had 
open house in her honor and Xmas 
evening Mr. and Mrs. B. Tepper 
gave a party at their lovely home 
in Rosedale, climaxing her visit at 
home. She returned to Washing- 
ton, Wednesday. 

Mrs. Carrie Surface is quite ill 



SB 



at this writing. Her many friends 
wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Mrs. Lee Bddins wishes to thank 
her many friends for their kind 
remembrances of Christmas cards 
and beautiful presents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Surface, of 
Carrollton and Robert Surface of 
Burnshide spent Christmas week 
with their mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Middendorf 
entertained Christmas Eve, Mr. 
and Mrs. Carl Middendorf of Avon- 
dale and Miss Dorothy Middendorf 
of Washington, D. C. 

Seaman Frank Rudd has been 
given a medical discharge and has 
Joined his wife and son he**. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rudd expect to leave in 
the near future for Washington, D. 
C, where they will make their 
home. 

Mrs. John M. Connley and sons 
entertained on Friday evening with 
a six o'clock dinner In honor of 
Miss Evelyn Connley and mother, 
of Erlanger. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Conner 
spent Xmas Day In Lexington, din- 
ner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Denny. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lavern Sullivan 
moved Saturday to the home of 
her parents, on U. S. 25. 

Miss Luretta Baxter of Harrison, 
Ind., is employed at the Cincin- 
nati post office during the holiday. 








LET IIS EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



L J METZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 
63/ Madison Ave., Covinqton. K\ 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 J PHONE 762 
BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed $2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.10 

32% Dairy Supplement l.^ 3.25 

Big V Laying* Mash ....7. 3.35 

Growing Mash 3.65 

Broiler Mash 3.65 

Turkey Grower ,.,.. 3.80 

40% Hog Supplement . 3.70 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Ration .... 3.45 

55% Meat Scrap '• 4.3-> 

41% Soybean Meal ...3.05 

Ground Wheat ..' • 2.85 

Wheat Middlings 2.75 

Wheat Bran 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal 2.85 

Hominy Meal ••••• 3.00 

Poultry Scratch , ••• 3.20 

24% Brewery Grain > • 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet 3.25 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt 1.25 

Block Salt , 65 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells , * 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



She enjoyed a few nights' visit 
with her (deter, Mrs. John M. Con- 
ley and sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Aylor and 
son will move to their new home 
on U. S. 42, recently purchased of 
Mr. and Mrs. Lavern Sullivan. 

Verne Arnold who entered the 
Navy October 21, 1044 is stationed 
at Great Lakes, HI. He Is a Petty 
Officer second class, serving as 
mall clerk for his Company. He 
would enjoy hearing from all of 
his friends. Tou can obtain his 
address from some member of his 
family. 3 

Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Glenn, of 
Price Pike entertained with a hol- 
iday dinner Saturday evening. 
Covers were placed for Mr. and 
Mrs. Oeo. Scott and Miss Jane 
Scott, Mrs. Jennie Bauers, Mrs. 
Katie Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Nus- 
baum and daughter, Misses Mary 
Elizabeth and Joe Ann Nusbaum 
and the host and hostess and fam- 
ily. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike O'Hara en- 
tertained a number of relatives 
Sunday with a dinner at their 
home on Price Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett en- 
tertained Sunday with a turkey 
dinner In compliment of Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Pennington' and Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Garnett, of Con- 
stance. 

This community was saddened to 
learn of the death of Thomas B. 
Ross, who passed away at Booth 
Hospital, after a two-day illness. 
Deepest sympathy is extended to 
the family. 

Mr. Conrad has returned to his 
home at Dry Ridge, Ky., after vis- 
iting his daughter, Mrs. Brady 
Johnson and family, of Burlington 
Pike during the holidays. . 

Misses Mary Jane arid Joe Ann 
Nusbaum enjoyed a few days' visit 
last' week with Mr. and Mrs. Jim 
Glenn and family of Price Pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and sons entertained on Wednes- 
day evening with a six o'clock din- 
ner party in compliment of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chester Coyle and son 
Calvin, of Ludlow. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. V. Lents have re 
turned home after spending the 
holidays with Mr. and Mrs. Cook 
and family, of Frankfort, Ky. 

Mrs. Robert Houston and little 
son, of Covington, spent Christmas 
Day with Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Houston and sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Baker, of Heb 
ron entertained on Christmas Day 
with a dinner in compliment of 
Miss Minnie Baxter, Chas. Beall 
and Mrs. Sterling Dickey. 

Mrs. Ell Borders, of Goodridge 
Drive had the misfortune to fall 
on the ice, breaking her elbow. We 
wish her a speedy recovery. 

The many friends of Mrs. Stan 
ley Lucas regret to learn of her 



Baby 
Chicks 

Metal Feeders and Founts 

Ful-O-Pep Poultry Feeds 

Dr. Heinz Hog & Dairy Feeds 

Dr. Salsbury's Poultry 

Remedies 

Ful-O-Pep 

FEED STORE 

512 Pike St.. Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 9168 

Open Sundays/Till Noon 



NEW /MAYTAG WASHERS! 

Watch our Display Windows for our 



NEW SHIPMENT OF 



NEW MAYTAG 






COMING SOON 



III 



WM. HAGEI 

"Authorized MAYTAG Dealef" 

856 Dixie Highway Phone Erl- 6106 

ERLANGER -■- v KENTUCKY 



\ 



serious Illness at her residence. 

The many friends of Mrs. Bill 
Clifton of near Florence regret to 
learn she is a patient In St. Eliza- 
beth Hosptial. She is reported to 
be doing nicely, following an oper- 
ation. ^ 

Miss Margaret Aylor became 
very ill Wednesday and was remov- 
ed to St. Elizabeth Hospital by Dr. 
Harry Daugherty. She is the 
youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guy Aylor, of Ooodridge Drive. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Cook and 
family, Mrs. Mary Black and Mrs. 
Sarah Lusher were dinner guests 
Christmas Day of Mr. and Mrs. 
Mose Black, of Erlanger Road. 
-Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Stephens 
spent Christmas r>ay at Hebron, 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Crad- 
dock and family. 

Miss Dell Utz, of Covington en- 
Joyed the holidays with her sister, 
Miss Fannie Utz. 

Mr. and Mrs. James P, Tanner 
and Mrs. Evelyn England enjoyed 
the Christmas holidays with Mr. 
and Mrs. Ed Bentham and family, 
of Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haynes Bruce, of 
Ludlow spent Christmas Day with 
Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Lucas. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and son entertained with a turkey 
dinner on Christmas Day in "com- 
pliment of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Markesbery, Mr. Gordon Souther 
and Mr. and Mrs. H. V. Tanner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett were 
dinner guests Christmas Day of 
Mrs. Jim Morris and family of Cin- 
cinnati. 

•Mrs. Sarah Lusher and Mrs. 
Mary Black of Erlanger were din- 
ner guests Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. 
Elbert Cook and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Snyder 
entertained on Christmas Day with 
a turkey dinner in compliment of 
their children and grandchildren. 

Mrs. Virginia Kendall spent last 
Sunday with her grandmother, Mrs. 
Amanda Tanner of Price Pike. 

The many friends of Mrs. Anna 
Cleek regret to learn she remains 
very ill at her home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Clore and 
family entertained with a turkey 
dinner at the their home in New- 
port on Christmas day in compli- 
ment of his father Lon Clore and 
wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Snyder en- 
tertained with an oyster supper on 
Tuesday evening in honor of his 
niece Minnie Baxter and Chas 
Beall 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
entertained with a six o'clock din*- 
ner party on Friday evening in 
compliment of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. 
Worthington and son. 

Mrs. Jennie Bauers and Mr. and 
Mrs. Joe Nusbaum and daughters 
entertained Christmas Day with a 
turkey dinner in compliment of 
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Scott and 
daughter Jane, Mrs. B. Long, Mr. 
and Mrs. James Glenn and family 
and Mrs. Katie Scott. 

Mrs. Joseph Surface, of Carroll- 
ton was called to the bedside of 
her mother-in-law Carrie Surface, 
who remains very ill. 

Mrs. Anna Clore entertained 
with a family dinner on Christ-* 
mas Day. 

Paul Tanner of Frankfort spent 
the holidays with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lon Tanner and brother 
Bobby. 

Mrs. Alice Martin, of Lloyd Ave., 
enjoyed the week-end with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Blaine Shep-^ . 
herd, of Layne Farm. 
(Billy Huey, son of Rev. O. M. 
Huey, who is in the Navy, station- 
ed in Oregon, is enjoying a fur- 
lough with his father at Louisville. 
He spent the week-end with 
friends here. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Cook and 
Jimmy Mahorney entertained with 
a Christmas dinner in compliment 
of his children and grandchildren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Glenn enter- 
tained with a dinner on Sunday 
evening at their home on Price Pike 
wmpllmentlng Mr. and Mrs. Clin- 
ton Blankentoeker, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Berkshire and son oJe Clinton. 

R. E. Tanner and wife entertain- 
ed with a turkey dinner on Christ- 
mas Eve. Those who enjoyed the 
occasion were Mrs. Jenny Dobbins, 
R. F. Woodward and wife and P. J. 
Allen and wife. 

Thoedore Carpenter and wife 
entertained with a family dinner 
party on Christmas Day. 

R. E. Tanner and wife spent 
Christmas Day with Andy Holz- 
worth and wife of near Union. 

J. T. Stephenson, wife and son 
E. G. entertained with a turkey 
dinner, Christmas Day. 

The relatives of Mrs. Mary Rouse 
gathered at her home for a Christ- 
mas party and dinner on Sunday 
before Christmas. 

"VVe extend congratulations to 
George Cook and bride (nee Louise 
Mahorney) who were married re- 
cently. 

NEW YEAR GREETINGS to the 
YANKS all over the world. 

Mrs. Emma Cleek entertained on 
Christmas J>ay with a dinner in 
honor of her brother, N. H. Clem- 
ents and son Ivan, of Hathaway 
and Mr. and Mrs. David C. Clem- 
ents, of Covington and Edward C. 
Clements of Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Emma Cleek entertained the 
W. M. U. of the Florence Baptist 
Church Sunday afternoon. Seven 
members were present as follows: 
Mrs. Holden, Mrs. H. Smith, Mrs. 
Blanche Beemon, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. 
Sadie Tanner,/ Mrs. Ruth McKibbin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Russ enter- 
tained a group of friends from 
'Cincinnati on Sunday afternoon. 



Pvt. George Ford, who has been 
enjoying a tew days* furlough at 
home, visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
Russ, left Sunday far a camp In 
Maryland. 

Mrs. Emma Cleek received a let- 
ter from Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Mc- 
Cabe, who are spending a few 
months at Tampa, Fla. They write 
that they are having cool weather 
there, frost has killed some fruit 
and vegetables. 



HEBRON HONOR ROLL 

Eighth Grade— John Carver, My- 
rilyn Campbell, Rilla Pepper, 
Martha Pfalzgraf and Helen Ed- 
wards, 



Seventh Grade— Jean RY*e, Billy 
Cave, Betty Delph. 

Sixth Grade— Donald Herbstreit, 
Roger Schneider and Virginia 
Cummins. 

Fifth Grade— Tommy Weghorn, 
Margie Masters, Carol Asbury, 
Maudie Lloyd, Mary Lou Hill, Viv- 
ian Cave, Duane Towhsend, Billy 
Louis, Goodridge, and Ronnie Gar- 
nett. " 

Fourth Grade— Ronnie Hodges, 
Anna Louise Elliott, Nina Bennett, 
and Barbara Schwier. 

Third Grade— Jane Rogers, Bet- 
ty Schwier, and John L. Crigler. 

Second Grade — June Conner, 
Nareta Cave, Laverne Jergens, 
Mary Lou Utz, Kathleen Anderson, 
and Vera Conrad. 

First Grade — Leilani Bennett, 
Marlon Blaker, Betty England, 
Mickey Conner, Louis Crigler, Jim- 
my Plop, and Gary Purcell. 



Office of Pi ce Ads | 3 

Observe OPA celling prices, and 
(I) Mark the appropriate grade' on 
the beef, veal, lamb, or mutton they 
offer for sale. 

Fanners are permitted to either 
grade their own meat or request a 
federal grader to grade it for them. 

Both licensed slaughterers who 
have been authorized to grade their 
own meats, and fanners, must 
stamp the appro p riate grade marks 
along the chine bone, down along 
the leg and on the belly with grade 
stamps not more than two inches 
apart. All beef, veal lamb, or mut- 
ton offered- for sale by anyone, 
whether farmer or 
slaughtered, must be stamped with 
applicable grade mark. 

Since farmers are not required 



to have a 
slauftster, It If not 
have a neense or permit 
the 




FARROWS FALL nO» 
Of 



Brooder houses are made to do 
doubleduty, on the farm of W. at 
Dudley in Adair county, by using 
them for farrowing pigs in the 
fall when there are no chickens in 
them The only thing done, to 
them is to pla«e a guard rafl 
around the inside, about IP 
from the floor, where the pigs 

from being crashed. 
Rankin, county agent 

the idea to all farmers who 
fan pigs. 




MISUNDERSTANDING 

AMONG FARMERS, PUBLIC 
IN SLAUGHTER OF STOCK 

There has been a general mis 
understanding among farmers, re- 
tailers and the public as to slaugh- 
ter requirements farmers must 
meet to be in compliance with^ 
existing war meat orders, Gavin S. 
Dudley, district representative of 
the War Food Administration's of- 
fice of Distribution, said today. As 
a means of clarifying this mis- 
understanding, the War Food Ad- 
ministration and the Office of 
Price Administration have issued 
the following explanation. 

Since May 25, 1944, farmers have 
been permitted to slaughter live- 
stock they own and sell the meat 
there from without a license or 
permit. 

„A farmer is' defined as "any per- 
son chiefly engaged in producing 
agricultural products as the resi- 
dent operator of a farm," and the 
term "own," as related to livestock 
slaughtered by farmers, is inter- 
preted as the livestock which has 
been grown or fed for 60 days or 
more by the farmer. 

Farmers are premitted to sell 
such meat providing they (1) Col- 



YOUR BEST INVESTMENT 

Wa* Bo*uU-1foHA, Qum Jkum 

LET US PROTECT 'YOU* HOME 

with a NEW WEATHERTIGHT ROOF 

First put your money into War Bond* and Stamp*— than 
sura you hava a good, weathartight roof for tho lasting ; 
tion of your home investment. Wa offer a highly sldllad 
in roof repairs and re-roofing and protac t our customer"* 
arts by using CAREY Asphalt Shingles— TOPS in roofing 
Wa handle all details. No red tap*. Cell us today fa* 
? -saving roof service. 




•Buy WAR BONDS 
wl STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger Kentucky 



* J.W 



STANDARD FOR OVLR 60 YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 




£ 



JOE DENTON . . . WHAS* sew staff tenor now 
co-starring on the Fair Weather Hoar heard 
Fridays at 6:30 p.m. is moving rapidly toward 
the upper brackets on your favorite 
parade. Born in Indianapolis, Denton grad- 
uated from high school there, then stadied 
Voice with the Arthur Jordon Conservatory 
after receiving a scholarship. Only 26, now, 
and single, Joe Denton is a cinch for television 
because of his rare combination of personality and vocal talent. 



Lured from a featured spot in a Chicago night club where he 
pearing with a big name band, Joe succumbed to the entreaties of our 
program co-ordinator, who caught his show daring a radio convention 
in the Windy City. Despite his youth, Joe has travelled the entire 
™< eountry with hands, and had an important west coast radio program 
„ . called "Out of the Night to You," of ballads, hymns, poems. 

1 " 

Possessing an unusual voice range, oar swoon crooner knows how to) 

work with an orchestra, and wins all hearts with his ingratiating smile. 

Joe also knows a snappy thing or two about elegant attire. His hobby 

is collecting the latest recordings of big 






Join the gr o w in g 



/or Jo* 



RADIO STATION 




~) 



■MSB 









JANUARY 4, JJtt 



THE BOONE COUNT* RECORDER, BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



MViDP^S MV rHRIIOl 

Tan community agricultural pro- 
gram planning meetings for IMS 
will be held during the next three 
weeks, according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. Dates for the meet- 
ings win be announced in the near 
future. 

Leading farmers for a good 
many years have met in commu- 
nity meetings, discussed their past 
year's progress and plumed new 
and improved practices to be car- 
ried out in the new year. These 
meetings have resulted in acceler- 
ated use of better farm practices 
and widespread agricultural im- 
provement. They are the place 
where new ideas receive the thor- 
ough and intelligent discussion of 
experienced farmers. 

It is hoped that all farmers who 
can conveniently do so will attend 
the local planning meeting sche- 
duled for their community. 



It Is estimated that 85 percent of 
the sheep raisers in Graves county 
have followed the phenothiazine 
program. 



PAYING HONOR TO TO 

THE BUS DRIVERS OP 
CONSTANCE-HEBRON BUS 

Yes, we pay honor to our good 
neighbor, the Defense plants get a 
large E, the boys at the front are 
bestowed with medals; but how 
about the boys at home behind the' 
wheel, rain or shine, sleet or ice, 
hearing grumps and grumblers 
when the bus is late creeping over 
icy roads where chemicals and sand 
never are scattered due to labor 
and material shortage. 
-How about paying ho ma ge to the. 
boys who continued through this 
all, never missing a trip, Leo Cot- 
ton and Bill Maegley. We the rid- 
ers honer you by means of co-op- 
eration of the Boone County Re- 
corder and wish you the compli- 
ments of the season. This goes to 
the owner of the bus line Francis 
Loe. 

—An Early Morning Rider. 



CHRISTMAS PARTY 

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Conley, of 
Constance entertained on Christ- 
mas Day with a turkey dinner for 
relatives and friends. 

It was a great source of enjoy- 
ment for all, especially Mrs. Con- 



>i35 * 



SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Deliver — Phone 74 



BURLINGTON, 



KENTUCKY 



FLOUR, Town Talk 25 lb. bag 81.35 

CORN MEAD>; . .5 lb. bag 25c 

CORN No/? can 20 pts. per can 12c 

PEAS, No. 2 can 20 points per can 15c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can 10 points per can 14c 

PORK & BEANS, Campbells 16 oz. can 10c 

MIXED VEGETABLES 16 oz. jar 15c 

PEACHES, All Gold No. 2V 2 can .60 pts, per can 29c 

PEARS, Good Taste, No. 2»/ 2 can 60 pts. per can 32c 

APRICOTS, Fame, No. ZVi can 40 pts. per can 31c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE No. 2 can 15c 

ORANGE JUICE No. 2 can 20c 

GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Meat 2 for 15c 

ORANGES, 200 size '. . . .per doz. 40c 

APPLES, Cooking or eating per lb. 10c 

CARROTS . . v « per bunch 10c 

CABBAGE* per lb. 7c 

PEANUTS per lb. 27c 

ENGLISH WALNUTS per lb. 40c 

FLAKE HOMINY per lb. 8c 



«t 



WANTED FARMS 

We have buyers f orlarge or small farms. If you 
wish to sell we would appreciate your listing. 
Just fill in or write any information regarding 
your farm that will be helpful to us in finding 
it or better still if in Covington stop at our of- 
fice and give us the opportunity of meeting you 
and getting better acquainted. 



ACRES. 



ley's sister. Miss Nell Hempfling, 
who is convalescing at their home. 
Others participating in the gay 
♦holiday festivity were Mr. and Mrs. 
Casper C. Hempfling and daughter 
Emily Anne, Mrs. Emily Drelling, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Heinz, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Fox, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ray Hempfling, Mr. and Mrs. Eu- 
gene Hollis, Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
Muenchenbach, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Hempfling, Mr. and Mrs. Edw. 
Kurtzburger and Miss Jesse Con- 

le y- 1 



X 



Marvin Early 



Marvin Early, 60, retired Mason 
Country farmer and garage owner 
died of a heart attack, Thursday, 
Dec. 28th at the home of his son- 
in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
G. K. Klopp, Erlanger. 
,'• Funeral services were conducted 
at the funeral home of Alberts & 
Knox in Maysville, Ky., Saturday at 
2 o'clock. Burial was in Flemings- 
burg Cemetery. 

He is survived by his. widow 
Linda; one daughter, Mrs. G. K 
Klopp; two grandchildren Jane 
Ann and John; one sister and two 
brothers. 



It is estimated that around 7, 
000 acres of balbo rye were seeded 
In Todd county, principally for 
pasture. 



G 



AYET 



THEATft 



ERLANGER, ELSMERE, KY 




FREE PARKING LOT 



TONIGHT — FRIDAY 

JANUARY 4TII AND 5TH 

BARBARA STANWYCK 

FRED McMURRAY 

EDWARD ROBINSON 

—in— 

DOUBLE 
INDEMNITY 

Also Little Lulu Cartoon 
Feature Starts: 7:12 - 9:19 



Road .miles from 

V 

Improvements: House .\ Barn .. 

Miles to Bus • School Bus \. 

NAME 



7 



.,,-.-.. 



ADDRESS ; 

The Noel Co. 

E. H. GROGER, Sales Mgr. 

31 E. 8EVENTH STREET CO. 1618 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY INDEPENDENCE 6837 



WHEN YOU ARE IN NEED OF 

WATER PUMPS 

SEE YOUR MAYTAG DEALER 

WM. HAGEDORN 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. 




SATURDAY 

JANUARY 6TH 
Continuous 2 to 11:39 P. M. 

GENE AUTRY 
SMILEY BURNETTE 

—in— 



Melody Trail 



Chapter 6 "Flying Cadets" Comedy 

Feature Starts: 2:54, 4:45, 6:36, 
8:39, 19:24 



Ration Changes Made 



The drastic rationing regulation 
put into effect Tuesday, December 
26, was made necessary by a num- 
ber of circumstances and condi- 
tions according to an announce- 
ment by Chester Bowles, OPA Na- 
tional Administrator. 

Bowles said the decision was "a 
difficult one to reach" but It was 
the only solution to the "tough- 
est sort of a problem." "When 
Americans understand the facts 
back of the action — I am sure they 
will welcome the action." 

He said there was no alternative 
to invalidation of outstanding 
coupons, but that the decision was 
taken with great reluctance. "Sup- 
plies are Just not large enough to 
permit spending of both 1945 ra- 
tion stamps and all of those car- 
ried over from 1944," he explained. 
* V5 AH poirtt-free canned vegetables 
return to the ration list, all red 
and blue ration points issued be- 
fore December 1 are canceled and 
butter Jumps from 20 to 24 points 
a pound. The OPA also returned 
about 85 per cent of all meat cuts 
to the list but this phase of the 
order did not become effective, 
until Sunday, December 31. 

The action cancels all sugar 
stamps except No. 34 but OPA Di- 
rector Chester Bowles advised that 
a new sugar stamp will become 
valid February 1 and will be good 
for five pounds. 

If notice had been given of any 
cancelation, a run would have un- 
done the very job of fair and equit- 
able distribution the OPA was try- 
ing to do. 

The OPA chose the Christmas 
holiday. week-end to place its new 
order in effect to prevent a rush 
by hoarders to stock up. 

Meats covered by the regulation 
include utility beef, better grades 
and cuts of veal, bacon ,pork 
shoulders, spareribs, beef and veal 
liver and some sausages. Canned 
vegetables returned tp the list are 
asparagus, green and waxed beans, 
corn, spinach and peas. 

Bowles advised consumers to de- 
stroy all old canceled stamps at 
once, warning that grocers will not 
be permitted to accept them. . 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

JANUARY 7 AND 8TH 
Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:39 P. M. 



BRIAN DONLEVY 



ANN RICHARDS 



—in— 



AN AMERICAN 
ROMANCE 



Also Latest News 

FEATURE STARTS: 

Sunday: 2:31, 5:94, 7:14, 9:29 
Monday 7:99, 9:28 



TUES., and WEDNESDAY 

JANUARY 9 AND 19TH 
BEAUTIFUL TECHNICOLOR 



BETTE DAVIS - CLAUDE RAINS 



MR. 

SKEFFINGTON 

. ' Also Cartoon 

Feature Starts 7:00, 9:19 



INVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
BUY WAR BONDS 

We Issue Them 



BULLITTSVILLE HOMEMAKERS 

The Bullittsville Homemakers' 
Club was entertained in the" home 
of Mrs. Pfalzgraf. The president 
called the meeting to order. 

The business session was held in 
the forenoon, which was very ef- 
fective. Our H. D. A. gave us some 
good advice for the coming year. 
We adjourned with a prayer for 
the lunch. f* ; 

After a delicious lunch we were 
invited to the living room which 
attractively decorated for the hol- 
iday season. A beautiful tree was 
the center of attraction with ex- 
change gifts for all present. 

The club collect was read. Our 
citizenship chairman entertained 
with a reading ''First Costumes and 
Jewels Worn by the Human." 

Eight members and our H. D. A. 
were present. Next meeting Janu- 
ary 18 at Mrs. B. Roberts. Let us 
all be present. 

Mrs. M. M. Lucas, Sec'y. 



hebron Homemakers 

Hebron Homemakers were enter- 
tained recently with a Christmas 
party by Mrs. I-nell Anderson, 
Youell Road. At the business ses- 
sion presided over by Mrs. Marie 
Asbury, president, plans were made 
to spread Christmas cheer to 
someone less fortunate. A vote was 
made^and carried to give a dona- 
tion for the Boone County Room 
at Ft. Thomas Convalescent Hos- 
pital. 

Following the covered dish lunch- 
eon, games were played and gifts 
were exchanged. Present were Mes- 
dames H. Acra, R. Asbury, L. 
Crutcher, S. Graves, R. Hodge, R. 
Hollis, J. Hogan, A. D. Hunter, E. 
Peel, A. Rogers, E. Lea, R. Schneid- 
er, R Parrott, C. Riley., F. Hoss- 
man and Miss Lucille Riley. Guests 
were Mrs. R. Youell and Miss Low- 
ry, County Health Nurse. Miss 
Mary Hood Gillaspie was also pres- 
ent. 

The next meeting will be at the 
home of Mrs. fcathryn J. Peel, of 
Hebron. 

Publicity Chairman-. 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Sunday, January 7, 1945: 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. Bro 
Paul Rlmmer ^rill bring the mes- 
sage. 

Congregational meeting Satur- 
day, January t, starting at 12:00 
noon with basket dinner and busi- 
ness meeting. [Election of officers 
will follow. 

_^ i-z , 



FLORENCE 

(Delayed) 

Mrs. Lillian Schram and daugh- 
ter and Mrs. Russell Bethel spent 
a pleasant evening Wednesday 
with Mrs. H. B. Wlngate, of Cov- 
ington. 

Ralph G. Worster, E. M. 1/c 
called on his sister, Mrs. Russell 
Bethel Thursday afternoon. He is 
enjoying a 30-say leave after duty 
in the Pacific, i 

Leroy BetheHG. M. 3/c is con- 
valescing at a U. S. Naval Hospital 
San Diego, California, after an op- 
eration. 

Friends of Mrs. Lora Laile regret 
to learn of her illness at hex resi- 
dence the past week. 

Miss Luretta Baxter, of Harrison, 
Ind., who has a position in Cin- 
cinnati, enjoyed a few nights' visit 



imiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiimimiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiii 

This Week In OPA 

iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiimimiiimiiMiiiiiiiii 

Food Stamp Changes 

Several food stamp changes were 
announced this week. 

All sugar stamps except No. 34 in 
War Ration Book Four have been 
canceled. Stamp 34, which became 
good for 5 pounds on November 16, 
1944, remains valid indefinitely. 
Another sugar stamp, good for 5 
pounds, becomes valid on February 
1, 1945. 

All blue stamps previously used 
for the purchase of processed foods 
except X-5, Y-5, Z-5, A-2 and B-2, 
in War Ration Book Four, have 
been canceled. Stamps C-2, D-2, 
E-2, F-2 and G-2 In Boole Four are 
valid on January 1, 1945. 

All red stamps in Ration Book 
Four, which have been used for 
the purchase of meats and fats, 
except Q-5, R-5 and S-5, have been 
canceled. Red stamps T-5, U-5, V-5 
W-5 and X-5 are valid. 

All food stamps have a value of 
10 points, 

Used Car Ceilings Maintained 

Prevailing price ceilings on used 
cars and trucks, scheduled to be 
reduced by four percent next 
month, will be maintained instead. 

The OPA said the reduction was 
canceled "to keep the market 
stocked with the largest inventory" 
possible. 

"Such an inventory is vitally 
needed in the war emergency to 
maintain transportation of war 
workers and goods and equipment 
needed for war and essential civ- 
ilian uses," OPA said. 

Gasoline Coupons Expire 

On December 31, 1944, the B-4, 
C-4 and "4th quarter. T" gasoline 
ration coupons expired for con- 
sumers. 

Service station operators will 
have 10 days, or through January 
10, 1945, in which to turn in their 
B-4, C-4 and "T" coupons. Simil- 
arly, distributors will have ten ad- 
ditional days, or through January 
20, to deposit these coupons in 
their ration bank accounts. 
Beds, Mattresses Prices Set 

Effective January 1, 1945, beds, 
cots and mattresses now being 
sold by the Government for civ- 
ilian Use are provided with dollar- 
and-cents resale ceiling prices by 
the OPA. 

Covered are two types of used 
bunk beds, including springs; ope 
type of new foldhig canvas cot; 
one type of used folding canvas 
cot; one type of new mattress, and 
one type of new folding hospital 
bed, including mattress. 

For the protection of the con- 
sumer, a tag must be attached to 
each article .showing the retail 
ceiling price, and whethef the 
article is being sold "as is" or re- 
conditioned. 



WORKERS NEEDED AT 

FORT THOMAS HOSPITAL 



Again the appeal is being made 
to the women of Boone County 
through the Red Cross to volunteer 
for office work at the Army Air 
Force Convalescent Hospital in Ft. 
Thomas. "We urgently need typ- 
ists and stenographers," Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Ooodridge Nestor, said, "and 
would appreciate anyone with a 
knowledge of shorthand to regist- 
er Immediately." 

Boone County sends volunteers 
each Tuesday from ten to four and 
each Saturday afternoon. Contact 
Mrs. Nestor, Florence,' Ky., tele- 
phone Florence 84. 



NOTICE 

The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



EXECUTRIX' NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Thos. E. Ryan, de- 
ceased, are requested to present 
same properly proven, according to 
law, and all persons knowing them- 
selves indebted to the said estate 
are requested to call and settle 
with the undersigned. 27-2-p 

Elizabeth M. Ryan, Exec. 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Minnie Schadler, 
deceased, are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons indebted to 
the said estate are requested to call 
and settle with the undersigned. 
Gay Collins, St., 
27-2t-p • Administrator 



SHEPHERDS ENTERTAIN 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Blaine Shepherd 
entertained with a family dinner 
at their home Sunday, in honor of 
their son-in-law and daughter, 
Cpl. and Mrs. Robert C. Martin, Jr. 

Guests were Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
C. Martin, Sr., and daughters, Janet 
and Marilyn, Mr. and Mrs. Grover 
E. Shepherd and son Dennie. 

Missed at this family dinner was 
Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd's other son, 
S/Sgt. Harold B. Shepherd, who is 
serving with the Marines in the 
South Pacific. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Resolutions of respect and sym- 
pathy concerning the passing of 
Bro. Wayne Brook, who was a mem- 
ber of Boone Union Lodge No. 304, 
F. & A. M., Union, Kentucky. 

WHEREAS, it has pleased Al- 
mighty God to remove from our 
midst, Bro. Wayne Brooks, who met 
death on a foreign battlefield, May 
20th, 1944, while performing his 
duty as an American soldier in de- 
fense of His and Our Country, 
Liberty, Christianity and the Insti- 
tution of Masonry. 

WHEREAS, it"" is our custom to 
make public expression of our sor- 
row; be it — . 

THEREFORE RESOLVED, that 
this Lodge has lost another valued 
member whom we all admired, and 
who cherished" and practiced the 
Great Tenants of our Institution f 
and be it further 

RESOLVED, the world has lost a 
worthy citizen, His neighbors an 
obliging man, and the communi- 
ties in which he lived and had 
lived, a perfect gentleman; and be 
it further 

RESOLVED, that we^ sincerely 
sympathize with his widow and 
hope we had the power to help 
her carry her burden of grief until 
a time when the memory of him 
will be a Joy for all. To his near 
and other relatives and acquaint- 
ances we offer consolation and re- 
grets of the demise of so good a 
man; be it further 

RESOLVED, that the Charter be 
draped for a period of thirty days, 
a, copy of these resolutions be sent 
to The Boone County Recorder for 
publication, a copy sent^ to the 
widow of Mr. Brooks, also that it 
be spread upon the Lodge Journal. 
S. S. BRISTOW, 
J. w . DOANE, 
J. C. PLATT, 
27-ltc . Committee. 



With her sister, Mrs. John M 
Connley and sons the past week. 
Mrs. Nan Tanner of U. S. 42 has 
returned home, after passing a few 
days with her daughter-in-law, 
Mrs. Russell Tanner, of Covington. 






ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Genevra Souther 
deceased are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law and all persons indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle with the undersigned. 
Wm. Markesbery. 
28-2t-c Administrator 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St. tf 



FOR SALE— Registered ' Chester- 
. white boar. Franklin Huey, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 2. Tel. Burling- 
ton 463. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Corner cabinet; chest 
of drawers with matching mir- 
ror; hand sweeper, several tables; 
innerspring mattress, practically 
new; porch gilder; lawn glider; 
metal wall cabinet; also numer- 
ous small articles. John Terlau, 
Burlington, Ky. Tel. 273. 28-2t-p 



WANTED— Tenant to milk cows 
and grow 4 acres of tobacco; 
tenant to furnish half of live- 
stock; have modern barn with 
silo and large house with electric. 
Apply at once to R. L. Bowman, 
Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. lt-c 



RAWLEIGH ROUTE available at 
once in Galiatin County. Good 
opportunity, write at once, Raw- 
leigh's, Dept. KYL-28-105, Free- 
port, 111. lt-p 



* 



FOR SALE— Big type Poland China 
sow and 6 pigs; also registered 
Duroc sow and 6 pigs. Mrs. R- 
J. Akin, Burlington, Ky. R. 1. lp 

MONUMENTS-^Any of my Boone 
County acquaintances or others 
may contact me by mail or meet 
every first Monday in Burling- 
ton. W. H. Florence, care Cres- 
cent Hotel, Covington, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Tractor discs, Interna- 
tional and John Deere; culti- 
packers; corn cultivators;; to- 
bacco planters; harness; rakes 
and mowers. Violett's, Route 17, 
Fiskburg, Ky. lt-pd 



FOR WELL DRILLING— Call or 
write Hubert Farrls, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Work guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 

DAIRY COWS— Another carload of 
record Brown Swiss, Holstein 
cows will arrive today for the 
new year. These are ail heavy 
producers, all T. B. and Bang's 
tested. Illinois horses and mules. 
All stock guaranteed. A week's 
trial given. Easy monthly pay- 
ments can be arranged. Hog feed 
$1.85 per 100 lbs. GENERAL 
DISTRIBUTORS, 30 E. Second 
St., Covington, Ky. Open Sun- 
day, lt-c 



FOR SALE— Apples, good small {dze 
$1.00 per bus. Also larger sizes. 
Wm. H. Moore, Hebron, Ky. Tel. 
Hebron 115. 28-2t-c 



WANTED— Man to work in sales 
stable who can take care of live- 
stock; also man for farm work. 
Good salary. GENERAL DIS- 
TRIBUTORS, 30 East Second St., 
Covington, Ky. lt-c 



FOR SALE — 6-room modern house, 
wirecut brick, tile bath, new 
hardwood floors, new furnace, 
double garage, well landscaped, 
on concrete street; assessments 
all paid. Vacant. Immediate 
possession. Contact Irene Scott, 
owner Burlington or Bessie Haley 
Real Estate, Dixie 7346. 27-2p 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— 34 mixed 
Hampshire ewes. Riverland Farm 
Lloyd Siekman, Mgr., Peters- 
burg, Ky. Tel. Burl. 370. 27-2-c 



FOR SALE— Household furniture, a 
Price Conner, Ed Rice place, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. 27-2t-c 



FOR RENT— 150-acre farm near 
Big Bone Baptist Church; 5-acre 
tobacco base. Orln Edwards, 
Union, Ky., R. 1. 27-4t-p 



FOR SALE^-Three No. 1 milch' 
cows, two are fresh. Ezra Conn- 
ley, on Robt. Grant farm, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. 28-2t-p 



WANTED— Tenant to raise 3 to 4 
acres of tobacco, corn and milk 
cows. Will furnish all tools and 
team or tenant may do same. A 
grand chance. If interested Call 
Walton 1412. 28-2t-c 



FOR SALE— Five good Shropshire 
ewes and one ram; also pony 
with* sled and harness. S. B. 
Faulkner on Conner's road near 
Hebron. Tel. Heb. 175. 28-2t-c 



WANTED TO BUY— Well 


cured 


hams at reasonable price. 


D. G. 


Fries, 1128 Cleveland Ave. 


Park 


Hills, Ky. Tel. HE. 7882. 


28-2c 



FOR SALE— 5 registered Black 

Angus cows, 4 years old and good 

1 3-year-old Aneus bull. Rov 



u-jrai-uiu nugus uuu. xtuy 

Schlver, Burlington, Ky., R. 1., 

npar Hohrnn H . 



near Hebron 



lt-c 



WANTED— Man to work on 150- 
acre farm; to furnish team, tools 
and four cows; 3 acres tobacco 
and 7 acres corn. Mrs. Linna 
Moore, U. S. 42, Walton, Ky., R. 2. 

lt-c. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— One thor- 
oughbred 200-pound Hampshire 
boar. Ed Berkshire, Burlington, 
Ky., R. 2. Tel. 465-X. ' lt-c 



FOR SALE— Sow and 7 pigs, 10 
weeks old; 2 fresh cows, one 
Holstein and one red cow; 2 good 
work horses. Kirtley McWethy, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 403. lt-p 



WANTED — Farmer, married couple 
must know tobacco; excellent 
working conditions; good pay. 
Millridge Stock Farm, Big Bone 

g Road. Waner G. Miller, Jr. 28-tf 



WANTED— Man and wife to work 
on farm in' Idlewlld section of 
Boone "County. All equipment 
furnished. Nice 3-room house. 
Phone E. J. Shannon, JEfferson 
2646, Cincinnati, or get in touch 
with Tom Clifford now on 
farm. 28-3t-c 



FOR SALE— Five heifers; 3 Hol- 
s_teins, one fresh, others to" fresh- 
en soon; 1 Jersey and 1 Guern- 
sey heifer, fresh; 9 good fresh 
cows. Pat Coleman, Burlington 
Pike. lt-p 



FOR SALE^-One team of mules; 
one 3-year-old mare; 1 nine- 
year-old mare. See H. C. Hand, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 2. 28-2t-p 



FOR SALE— New Oliver disc cultiv- 
ator, used one season. Lawrence 
Eckles, Burlington, Ky., R. 1., on 
Geo. Kreylich farm. 27-2p 



FOR SALE— 200 tons of good clover 
or timothy or mixed hajl^ Price 
$35.00 per ton FOB your station: 
alfalfa $42.00. Harry Ball, Fair- 
field, Iowa. 27-4t-p 



FARMERS file your 1944 income 
tax return now and save the 
trouble of having to file a declar- 
ation by January 15. Bring your 
1943 tax duplicates and 1944 
forms. Fee reasonable. Rw V. 
Lents, Florence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 
116. - 2f-2t-c 

HAULING— Specializing in live- 
stock. Call Dixie 7898, ask for 
Carl. 28-tf 



INOREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. Pullorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. sired matings. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm 
on shares. "Tenant to furnish 
work* stock and tools. Reference 
required. J. H. Huey, Petersburg, 
Ky. Tel. Burl. 238. 24-tf. 



FIGARO CONDENSED SMOKE— 
Figaro (Old Smoky) Sugar-cure 
sausage seasoning. Ful-O-Pep 
Feed Store, 512 Pike, HE. 9168, 
Covington, Ky. 18-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS In radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Rails 

Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington- COlonial 1121. tf. 



BE SAFfl— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

Dining Room Suites 




Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison, Cov. HE. »273 
MORE FOB TOUR MONEY 



^* 



w 



^mm 




the Boone Coumt Recorder 



= 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



MM 



y 




VOLUME 69 

' Mr*- 1 



— 



LOCKER SIGN-UP 
WILL CONTINUE 






IS WORD FOLLOWING EDUCA- 
TIONAL MEETING AT COURT- 
HOUSE JANUARY 4 — MANY 
SIGN CONTRACTS. 



The sign-up for the Burlington 
Frown Food Locker plant was given 
the "go" signal last Thursday 
night after the general education- 
al meeting was completed by sever- 
al well-informed speakers and a 
slide picture demonstration of 
what a locker plant is, and how it 
will serve the people of a rural or 
suburban section. 

Featured on the program was 
Earl Welch of the University of 
Kentucky, Miss Mary Hood Gillas- 
pie .Home Demonstration Agent 
and H. R. Forkner, County Agent, 
with a few brief remarks from 
equipment salesmen from two Cin- 
cinnati concerns. 

Following the education part of 
the program, the contract for lock- 
ers was discussed and explained 
and thirty-one of the thirty-five 
(families represented at the meet- 
tag, signed their contracts and 
each signer took sufficient con- 
tracts to pass to their neigh- 
bors to be signed and returned mot 
later than January 20th. 

A duplicate of the locker con- 
tract appears in this edition of The 
Recorder, and all that is required 
is to fill in the type locker you de- 
sire, sign your name and address 
at the bottom and attach your 
check for like amount, made pay- 
able to The Peoples Deposit Bank. 
Your check will be held by the 
bank until the plant is assured, but 
if for any reason the plant is not 
constructed, your money will be re- 
turned to you by the bank. 

The contract you sign is binding 
for a period of one year only, and 
if at the end of that time you are 
not satisfied with the service you 
receive, you are not obligated in 
any way to continue your rental. 

Many persons are under the im- 
pression that they will wait to see 
more before they sign their con- 
tracts. Many expect to wait until 
the plant is in operation before 
signing, which in all probability, 
will be too late as the persons who 
sign-up at the beginning anS as- 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January ii, ims 



Union Man Receives 

Promotion hi France 



With the Seventh Army In 
France— William L. Smith, Sr., of 
Union, Kentucky, was \ recently 
promoted to the grade, of staff 
sergeant while serving with the 
106th Cavalry Reconnaissance 
Squadron in France. 

He is the son of Mrs. Sally 
Smith, Burlington, Kentucky R. 2 
and 'the husband of Mrs. Dolores 
Smith, 12 Crescent Avenue, Er- 
langer, Kentucky. 

He entered the service January 
28, 1944 and served at Camp Liv- 
ingston, Louisiana and Camp 
Hood, Texas before coming over- 
aeas. 

Mrs. Frank Maurer and daugh- 
ter Joy, spent the week-end with 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Maurer and 
family of Cincinnati. 



REPORT GIVEN 
IN BOND DRIVE 



SERIES E QUOTA OVERSOLD 
FOR TOTAL OF $148,788.75, AC- 
CORDING TO FINAL REPORT 
BY CHAIRMAN. 



The final report of sales *ln the 
Sixth War Loan Drive shows a 
total of $444,830.25 for Boone Coun- 
ty, a little less than $35,000.00 of 
the $479,000.00 quota, according to 
the latest report of the Federal 
Reserve Bank 

The County's quota for Series E 
bonds was $132,640.00 and this was 
oversold for a total of $148,788.75. 

Enough subscriptions were re- 
jected 'to have more than made up 
the $35,000.00 shortage in this 
drive. 



slst in securing the priorities for 
the plant will be given first chance 
for locker rental In the years to 
follow. 

It is the history of other locker 
plants, that persons who failed to 
sign-up in the beginning never 
had a chance to rent a locker as 
they usually have a large waiting 
list of such persons desiring to 
rent lockers, but only have a cer- 
tain number of units to rent. 

The Frozen Food Locker business 
is a compartively new venture in 
the State of Kentucky, there being 
only 46 plants now in operation In 
the entire state. However, most of 
us are conscious of the fact that 
frozen foods are the coming thing 
and that In the postwar period we 
are to see most all of our present 
methods of food preservation give 
way to frozen foods. 

Several persons from this area 
have visited neighboring communi- 
ties now served by locker plants, 
our closest being Aurora,. Ind., and 
Falmouth, Ky., and in talking to 
the customer who has a locker 
rented they will tell you that the 
locker plant will save them time, 
and money as well as giving them 
a wide variety of home-grown foods 
at all seasons of the year. In the 
discussion with locker plant oper- 
ators they tell us that they are 
serving persons who live as far as 
15 to 20 miles from the plant and 
that these persons are satisfied 
with their plant and would not be 
without one. 

This writer. is convinced, after 
visiting other plants, that a locker 
plant at Burlington will serve 
Boone County well and save Its 
patrons money and labor. However, 
no one person or several persons, 
can put a project of this kind over, 
but it is going to take the help of 
all the people who are interested to 
get the project started, by helping 
to secure the required 180 signers 
for the priorities. 

The entire matter now rests with 
the people of this county as to 
Whether or not we are to be one 
of the first to have this modern, 
up-to-date method of food preser- 
vation. If a sufficient number can 
be secured, the plant can probably 
be in operation within three to 
four months after the sign-up Is 
completed. 

Educational meetings such as 
was held in Burlington are being 
planned for neighboring towns, 
and the dates will be announced 
In the near future. 

In the meantime, if you wish to 
sign your contract, you will be able 
to secure these forms from the fol- 
lowing persons: County Agent's 
office; Boone County Recorder 
office; M. G. Martin store, Flor- 
ence; Peoples Deposit Bank, Bur- 
lington; Courtney Pope, Grant; 
Wm. Loftin, Florence; Wm. Rogers, 
Jr., Grant; Hebron Deposit Bank, 
Hebron; Hubert Conner, Hebron, 
and Mrs. Vernon Pope, Burlington. 

Please have your contracts in the 
County Agent's office not later 
than January 20th, or leave them 
in the hands of one of the above 
named persons. -< 



CANNING WINNERS 
ARE ANNOUNCED 



CONTESTS HELD UNDER DIREC- 
TION OF COUN TY EXTENSION 
SERVICE— THIRTY FAMILIES 
ENTERED. 



Winners of the Home Canning 
and Home. Canning and Storage 
contests were announced this week. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Winningham, 
Richwood, placed first in the Can- 
ning and storage contest while Mr. 
and Mrs. Courtney Kelly, Burling- 
ton, placed second. Mrs. Cloyd 
Johnson, Beaver, was given the 
first award in the home canning 
contest, while Mrs. George A. 
Prigge, Hamilton, received the sec- 
ond award. 

The two contests were held un- 
der the direction of the County Ex- 
tension Service. Prizes for the 
combined contest were sponsored 
by the Boone County Recorder. Ten 
dollars was given to the winner 
and a two-years' subscription to 
The Recorder was the second prize. 
The Boone County Farm Bureau 
sponsored the home canning con- 
test with a first price of $10.00 and 
a second of a $5.00 year's member- 
ship to the Farm Bureau. 

Thirty different families enter- 
ed the contests but several had to 
drop out because of the summer 
drouth. Nine families completed 
the home canning while six com- 
pleted the home canning and stor- 
age contest, 

Judging was based on the bud- 
get report filled in by contestants 
and the quality of products. The 
exhibit of each entrant was visited 
by a committee. Thus, each entry 
was scored on quantity according 
to number in family' and quality 
of products. 



Entertainers Are 

Marooned la Burlington 

■ , * 

Because the roads' were so slip- 
pery they could not ' get to their 
homes in Greater Gibclnnatl eight 
motorists were maroaned Saturday 
night In the Boone County court- 
house where they enjoyed the hos- 
pitality provided by Rimer Kirkpat- 
rick. Jailer, and his associates who 
supplied cots and blankets for the 
weary travelers. 

Among those thankful to the 



CAMPAIGN DATES 
ARE ANNOUNCED 






FOR INFANTILE PARALYSIS 
DRIVE— GOAL IS SET AT 
TWICE AMOUNT RAISED LAST 
YEAR. 



As a result of the worst epidemic 

Of infantile paralysis in the his- 
Boone County .authorities for their ^ of toe Btate ^ Boone Qwm 



T* 



Delegates Attend State 
Farm Bureau Contention 



thoughtfulness were Mrs. Earl ty Commrttee> headed by Mrs. 
Banzhaf and Miss Jeanette Meyer, | EUzabeth ooodridge Nestor, Flor- 



employees of the Cincinnati Planer 
Co.; Mrs. Clifford Meyer, Mr. and 
Mrs. Arnold Staley and son Mich- 
ael, Mr. Austin- Cole and Mr. Mc- 
Arthur from Covington. 

All of the eight were delighted 
with the traditional southern hos- 
pitality shown them during their 
night in Burlington. 

Three of them were in the cast 
of the HJlly Billy Roundup at Bur- 
lington High School. Mr. Cole 
played the guitar and sang and Mr. 
Staley was a huck-aud-wing danc- 
er, bass fiddler and whistler. Mich- 
ael, 2y 2 , danced. 



Work Near Completion 
On Day Room At Ft 
Thomas AAF Hospital 



Sportsmen Urged To 
Buy IMS Hunting And 
Fishing Licenses early 



Samuel Walton 

Returns To States 



Advisory Council 

Meeting January 15 



Local Homemaker Club presi- 
dents and county committee chair- 
men will have their first Advisory 
Council meeting next Monday, 
January 15th. The group will meet 
at 1:30 p. m. in the grand Jury 
room at the courthouse. 

Important business to be con- 
sidered Is selection of delegates 
to Fkrm and Home Week, making 
of preliminary plans for program 
of work and acceptance of commit- 
tee reports. 

Mrs. Leo Flynn, county president 
will preside at the meeting. Miss 
Lulie Logan, assistant state leader 
of Home Agents, plans to attend 
the meeting. 



— 



Recruitment Of 

Nurses Urgent, Is Word 



All hunters and fishermen were 
urged today by Earl Wallace, Di- 
rector of the Division of Game and 
Fish, not to delay in purchasing 
their 1045 hunting and fishing li- 
censes. ^ 

In his statement for publication, 
Wallace pointed out that the Divi- 
sion of Game and Fish faces a 
"serious reduction" in revenues be- 
cause of the war, and that the 
only funds available for further- 
ance of the Division's restocking 
program come from hunters and 
fishermen. He explained that pur- 
chase of the 1045 licenses now with 
the resultant revenue, would be of 
great assistance to the Division in 
its conservation program for*^the 
present year. 

Wallace stated that December Is 
the big revenue month for the Di 
vision and during that month of 
1044 the Division receipts were 
short of those for 1043 and pre- 
vious years. This decline resulted 
from so many men going into the 
armed forces; men and women 
taking defense jobs with less time 
for sport and recreation; the rub- 
ber shortage and gasoline ration- 
ing and shortage of ammunition. 
The decline will continue as the 
war progresses and the only way 
revenue # can be maintained is 
through the purchase of licenses 
. by the people left back home. Even 
though a person might have no 
opportunity to hunt or fish, he or 
she can purchase a license and in- 
sure the continuance of the Con- 
servation Program in Kentucky 
and know that the money spent 
for such a license will help to keep 
the out-of-doors Intact for the 
men when they return from the 
pursuance of a victorious war. 
These men can then get out their 
guns and fishing tackle to seek out 
the sports they once enjoyed in the 
past. 



Work on the large Day Room 
Boone County organizations are 
furnishing for the convalescent 
soldiers at the Ft. Thomas Hos- 
pital is nearing completion. 

In this room will be found com- 
fortable couches and chairs, a desk, 
a ping pong table, game table, 
other small tables, a radio, and a 
player piano. Drapery for the 
eighty windows has been made by 
some of the women of Boone Coun- 
ty, under the direction of Mrs. 
John Vest. 

Several magazine subscriptions 
have been given to this room, and 
it Is planned to keep a filled cookie 
jar always on banc* - > . ■ 

Any organization still wishing to 
help with this project may do so 
by getting In touch with Mrs. W. 
M. Townsend, Burlington 55. 

A few small articles still are 
needed in the room, to complete 
the home like atmosphere, such as 
clean feathers for cusions, playing 
cards, games, puzzles, electric corn 
popper, sturdy ash trays or ash 
stands, urns to be filled with sand 
for ash receivers, rolls for the play- 
er piano, and heavy lamps, both 
of the table and floor variety. 
Anyone wishing to donate any of 
these things, call Miss Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, Burlington 412. 



ence, Kentucky, as director, will 
hold* a fund-raising ' campaign 
from January 14 to 31, with the 
object of raising double the amount 
contributed by this county last 
year. 

The need for this increased 
amount is urgent if hundreds of 
victims of polio in our State are 
to be restored to health and 
strength, because long convales- 
cent treatment is required to re- 
educate the muscles attacked by 
the disease. 

There has usually been a dance 
given for this campaign, but due 
to the lack of a place and gasoline 
shortage, no dance will be given 
this year. There will be a com- 
mittee in each locality to ask you 
to give and when you receive the 
March of Dimes Card, please fill 
in as many as you can and send 
the card in. A successful cam- 
paign for this work can only be 
made possible by a generous re- 
sponse from the public. 



Walter W. King and J. C. Acree 
left on Wednesday of this week to 
attend the State Farm Bureau 
Convention to be held at the 
Brown Hotel in Louisville, January 
10th to the 12th. They will repre- 
sent Boone County as delegates to 
the convention. 

Boone County is one of the nine- 
ty-two county Farm Bureaus In 
Kentucky that will be represented 
at the three-day convention. The 
chief item of business at the con- 
vention will be to form a state ag- 
ricultural program which the 
Bureau will sponsor In 1946. 



3. H 



CHIPLEY 
KILLED IN ACTION 



WAS A FORMER RESIDENT OF 
BURLINGTON— HAD BEEN Df 
ARMED SERVICE APFBOZDf- 
ATELT ONE TEAR. 



Mrs. Elizabeth Kenton 



Funeral services for Mrs. Biaa-^ 
foeth Kenton, who died at her home JTJ had Deen omM| ^^ j^ 



Date Set For Farm 

And Home Week 



near Llmaburg, Thursday, after a 
long illness were held at 2 p. m. 
Sunday at the Church of God, 
Paris, Ky. Burial was In the Paris 
Cemetery. She was 62. 

Mrs. Kenton is survived by her 
husband, Rollie Kenton; two sons, 
Cartney Kenton, Llmaburg and A. 
C. Kenton, seaman first class In 
the South Pacific .theater; one 
daughter, Mrs. Agnes Laughlln, 
Llmaburg and one granddaughter, 
Mildred Louise Kenton. 

Tharp and Stith, Florence fu- 
neral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 

Wm. Yancey Glore 



Pfc. Clarence L. Chipley, 21, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence L. Chip- 
ley, Sr., Krbmger Road, Erlanger, 
former residents of Burlington, was 
killed in France December 19. He 
was an infantryman in the Sev- 
enth Army. 

The Chipley family resided tor 
many years on the farm of Bern- 
ard Gaines, near Burlington, where 
Private Chipley had engaged hi 
farming with his father. He 



All Boone County nurses are re- 
quested to meet at the Covington 
Library auditorium Friday, Janu- 
ary 12, at 8:00 p. m., according Jo 
Elizabeth C. Lowry, R. N.; War Re- 
cruitment Committee of Graduate 
Nurses. 

This 4s the most important move 
nurses have been asked to do since 
the war. Please attend. 



Mrs. Grace Feldhaus is In re- 
ceipt of a telegram from her son, 
Samuel B. Walton, stating that he 
had arrived safely In the U. S. A. 
and hoped to be home in the near 
future. The telegram was dated 
January 2, 1946. 



Sgt. and Mrs. Fred B. Read (nee 
Pauline Aylor) have been spend- 
ing the week-end with her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. » Paul Aylor. Sgt. 
Read Is enjoying a 10-day furlough 
from Dupont, Delaware. They also 
visited his sister in Indianapolis, 
Ind. Miss Dortha J. Aylor, of 
Florence, sister of Mrs. Read en- 
joyed being with. them for a brief 
visit in the Aylor home. 




The date for Farm and ^lome 
Convention has been set for Janu- 
ary 30, 31 and February 1 and' 2. 
The meeting will be held at various 
buildings on the campus of the 
University of Kentucky,' Lexington. 
. A varied^ogrum has been -made 
for the sen's and the women's 
groups. The Women's section will 
meet in Memorial Hall. Each day's 
program will start at 10:00 a. m. 
and be concluded around 3:30 p. 
m. Friday will be devoted to the 
annual business meeting of Ken- 
tucky Federation of Homemakers. 

Several Homemakers' Clubs of 
Boone have made plans to send a 
delegate, according to Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, Home Demonstration 
Agent. 




Wm. Yancey Glore, lifelong resi- 
dent of Boone County passed away 
last Saturday, following a 
illness. Mr.' Glore made 
with his son Charles Glore, of 
Hebron. 

He Is survived by two sons, Chas. 
Glore, of Hebron and Wm. Glore, 
of Covington and two grandchil- 
dren. 



He attended school in Burling- 
ton and received his military train- 
ing at Camp Croft, 8. C. 

Besides his parents he is surviv- 
ed by two brothers Robert and 
Thurman Chipley; 9 sisters, Mary, 
Clarine and Mrs. C. L. Sullivan; two 
half-sisters, Mrs. Homer Anderson 
of Ludlow and Mrs. Arthur Buz- 
zard of Everette, Wash. 

The following telegram waa re- 
ceived from the War Department 
by the Chipley family: 

"The Secretary of War desires 
me to express his deep regret that 
your son Pfc. Clarence I. Chipley 
was killed in action In France De- 
cember 15. Concerning letter fol- 
lows. 

Dunlap, Acting Adj. General" 
Petersburg Boy Wounded 

Mrs. Harry Brassfleld received a 
telegram from the War Depart- 
ment stating that her husband Lt» 
Harry Brassfield was slightly 
wounded hi action December 24th. 
The telegram follows: 
I "Regret to inform you your hus- 
band, First Lt. Harry Brassfield was 



Funeral services were conducted Lughiiy wounded in action 24th 



Mrs. William Jarrell and daugh- 
ter Lynette, are spending a week 
with their parents Mr. and Mrs. L. 
L. Tucker and her brother, Ray, of 
the U. S. Navy, who is spending a 
furlough at his home, near Inde- 
pendence, 



Fish And Game Club 

Postpone January Meet 



93.75 A POUND FOR 

KENTUCKY LAMB SETS 

NEW PRICE RECORD 

A new record for lamb prices 
was set when the University of 
Kentucky Experiment^ Station 
grand champion lamb at the Chi- 
cago fat stock show sold for $3.75 
a pound. 

The lamb, a Southdown weigh- 
ing 91 pounds, was bred and fit- 
ted at the Experiment Station at 
Lexington and was strictly a Ken- 
tucky product. The Experiment 
Station also had the grand cham- 
pion lambs at the International 
Live Stock Expositions In Chicago 
in 1928 and in 1942, and has won 
numerous high awards on sheep at 
Chicago shows. 

This year the Experiment Sta 
tlon, in addition to the grand 
championship, won first, 10th, 13th 
and 14th on single Southdowns; 
first, third, fourth, fifth and 
seventh on Hampshlres, and first, 
second and third on Cheviots. 

It also had the reserve grand 
champion pen of three lambs, and 
won first and third on Hampshire 
pens, first and sixth on South- 
down pens and first on Cheviot 
pens. All sheep were bred at the 
Experiment Station. 

The Experiment Station won $394 
in cash prizes at the Chicago 
show this year. , 

The many high awards taken 
over the years by Experiment Sta 
tion lambs at Chicago reflects 
Kentucky's leadership in the na- 
tive lamb Industry, points out Dr. 
W. P. Garrlgus, head of the live- 
stock work at the Station. Harold 
Barber, noted shepherd, has fed 
and fitted Experiment Station 
show sheep for 22 years. 



Walton Youth 

Receiving Refresher 
Course In England 



from Sand Run Baptist Church on 
Tuesday at 2 p. m. Burial was In 
Sand Run Cemetery. 
. Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of arrangements. 



Everett Gaines Jones 



The" January meeting of the 
Boone County Fish and Game Pro- 
tective Association has been post- 
poned until February, according to 
the president, Irvin Rouse. 

The meeting will foe held the first 
Thursday in February, Mr. Rouse 
stated. At this time members of 
the organization will be enter- 
tained by Conservation officer 
Edwin Johnson. 



An Air Service Command Depot 
in England— Sgt. James S. Smith, 
husband pf Thelma Howe Smith, of 
9 South Main St., Walton, Ky., is 
going to school again— and his 
classmates are fighting soldiers 
from all the united nations. 

Preparing for the final aerial' 
smash-through over Germany, he 
is now taking Intensive refresher 
courses in aircraft maintenance at 
this repair and modification depot 
of the Air Service Command in 
England. 

Training with him are soldiers in 
the uniforms of England, France, 
Holland, Czechoslovakia, Australia, 
Canada, and other allies. 

They live and work together, 
learning to service battle planes 
now swarming over the continent. 
When they finish specialized train- 
ing under the Air Service Command 
they'll be ready to join fighting 
Air Force units at advanced bases 
in Europe. 

He has two brothers hi the ser- 
vice, Sgt. Wm. L Smith, France 
and Seaman Robt L. Smith, in the 
South Pacific. 

'■ »* i j» ■. • • :< 



Everett Gaines Jones, age 61, 
passed away at the home of his 
mother, Mrs. John L. Jones, Bul- 
littsville, following a short illness. 

Mr. Jones formerly lived in Chi- 
cago and was connected with the 
West Business College of that city. 

Besides his mother he is survived 
by one brother Burt Jones, of Bul- 
llttsville. . - 

Funeral services were conducted 
from the home Saturday at 2:30 p. 
m., with burial in Petersburg Cem- 
etery. 

Chambers and Grubbs were in 
charge of arrangements. 



HYBRID CORN HELPS 

SAVE COUNTY STOCK 



That hybrid corn saved Taylor 
county's livestock this year was 
stated by Farm Agent C. V^Bryant. 
Ninety percent of the county's 23,- 
000 acres of corn were planted to 
hybrid yielding 40 bushels to the 
acre, while open-pollinated varie- 
ties produced only 15 to 20 bushels, 
and often were complete failures. 
Mr. Bryant estimates that 350.000 
more bushels of the Hybrid corn 
were produced than the open poll- 
inated varieties, and that the in- 
creased yield would produce from 
25,000 to 30,000 extra hogs, and 
would feed 10,000 more steers. 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Sunday, January 14, 1945: v 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m 
Rev. Paul Rimmer will deliver the 
sermon. 

Monday night, January 15. Broth- 
erhood meeting and Missionary So- 
ciety will meet at the church at 
8:00 p. m. ►, 

Tuesday night, January 16, the 
Church Council will meet at the 
church'. 



Petersburg Soldier 
Receives Bronze Star 
For Heroic Achievement 

First Lieutenant J. L. Aylor, of 
Petersburg, was recently awarded 
the Bronze Star medal for heroic 
achievement. 

He is a rifle platoon jeaoer^-witti 
an assault infantary battalion sta- 
tioned in Germany. 

He received the Bronze Star for 
his excellent leadership of a pla 
toon in a night raid on Banchem, 
Germany. While fighting he was 
dazed by the concussion of a 
grenade. * . 



December in Luxembourg. Too will 
be advised as reports of 
are received. 

Dunlap, Acting Adj. 

Sgt. Watte 

Mrs. Ida Watts was informed this 
week that her son Sgt. James W. 
Watts was seriously wounded while 
fighting in Germany. The telegram 
follows: 

Mrs. Ida Watts, 
R. 1, Burlington, Ky. 

"Regret to Inform you your son 
was seriously wounded In action in 
Germany 16th December. Until new 
address is received address mail far 
him: Sgt. James W. Watts, Serial 
No. Hospitalized Central Postal Di- 
rectory APO 640, care Postmaster, 
N. T. You will be advised as re- 
ports of conditions are received. 
"Dunlap. Acting Adj. General'' 



21 



Memorial services will be held 
for Joe Taylor, son of Mrs. 
Taylor, of Florence, at the 
Baptist Church, January 21 at 11 
o'clock, according to announcement 
made this week. 

Taylor was killed in action on 
Anguai Island, Palau Islands On 
September 18th. 



Memorial 

Planned For Joe 
Taylor, 



Mr. and Mrs. Ovit Webster en- 
tertained Christmas Day with a 
turkey dinner. Guests were Mr. 
and Mrs. Omer Jump and daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Ottis Alexander 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Chris 
Whitaker, Ida Mae Fleek and Mrs. 
Charles Webster and daughter. 



THREE INJURED 
IN COLLISION 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kelly and. 
Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Kelly and f am 
ily spent last Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Kelly. 



Hebron Lodge Name 

Officers At Meeting 



ON RICHWOOD-UNION 
REMOVED TO ST. 
HOSPITAL BY 
GRUBBS' AMBULANCE. 




Mr. and Mrs. Pink Rich, of 
Union, were pleasant callers at The 
Recorder office Tuesday. While 
here they had their subscription 
moved up for another year. 



At the annual election of officers 
of Hebron Lodge No. 757 F. & A. 
M., the following were elected: 

John E. Crigler, Master; Haynes 
E. Bruce, Senior Warden; James 
E. Stephens, Junior Warden; Stan- 
ley M. Graves, Treasurer; Elijah 
Stephens, Secretary; Charles Clore, 
Senior Deacon; Wm. H. Mahorney, 
Assistant Deacon; Raymond Cave, 
Tyler; Ben Kottmyer, Stewart; 
Denver R. Moore, Stewart. 

The Chaplin and Junior Deacon 
were not appointed at this 
ing. * . 



Three youths suffered 
when then* 
skidded against a bridge on the 
Richwood-Union Road, Saturday 
Ubjht 

The youths injured were James 
Sandlin, 17, knee and head cute, 
and Preston Sandlin, 16, both of 
Walton and Donald J. Staemore, It 
of Union, Ky. The Sandltn boys 
suffered nose and scalp injuries, 

wruie oucuiviv «~~ — 

chest Injuries. 

The youths were removed to 8k. 
Elizabeth Hospital tor treatment 
by the Chambers * Grabbs am- 
bulance, Walton. 

w. B. Wheeler, of Midway, Ky„ 
suffered back injuries, when tfcs 
car in which ha #ras riding over- 
turned Saturday night on U. •> 
35 south of Walton. Hi 
moved to St. Elisabeth 
for treatment by the 
of Chambers es Grubbs, 




r, JANUAKY 11, IMS 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



BOnilE GQIINTY REORDER 



A. E. STEPHENS, 
RAYMOND COMBS. 



ftatered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Clan Mall Matter 



Y THURSDAY 



ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 

AD VERTIS1NQ INFORMATION 
DISP LAY : Mc per ^dumn Inch. 

■OTICK8 AND CARDS or THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. ~^~ — .. — ... ; . \ , 

CLASSIFIED ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
word drife cent each. All classified ads. payable In advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
i; column depth, 21 Inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate ,.' $1.50 Per Year 



AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Years 



kentucky pres! 
As sociation , 

OltAtlllD JAHUitt. Itf» 



Stand Up Straight 



\. 



■ 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED EDEE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

MIL 

BURLINGTON 95 

I ■ * . 

We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 



BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 




muscles must taken on more and 
more of this burden of weight 
bearing, a burden for fatigue and 
later actual deformity of certain 
of the bones and joints. 

The first necessity in good pos- 
ture is good feet. 

Show me a person with good 
posture and bad feet. It's almost 
impossible. 

But show me a person with good 
posture and I'll show you a per 
son with good feet, for good posture 
starts with good feet. The found- 
ation of any sup<r structure is 
the most importantr 

Don't suffer another day with 
your feet. 

No matter how many shoes or 
trial supports you have tried, try 
Just one more and have one of our 
foot comfort specialists make a 
free foot analysis and show you 
how to get rid of all foot pains, leg 
pains, backaches and headaches. 
Even arthritis and rheumatism 
pains are often mistaken — most 
times when feet are corrected the 
pains vanish. We know we can 
help you to stand up straight.- 
Adv. 



N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at — 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



Standing and sitting erect re- 
1 quire less muscular effort than the 
slumper posture for the normal, 
healthy person. With the body in 
an erect attitude the center of 
gravity passes more nearly through 
the center of the body and places 
the weight on bones and . liga- 
ments that are by nature equip- 
ped to meet this demand. When 
the head slumps forward, the 
shoulders drocp, the spine curves 
and the abdomen bulges; then 




BELLEVIEW BAPTIST W. M. S 

The regular meeting was held at 
the home of Mrs. Clara Hensley 
January 3rd with twelve members 
present. 

Zora Scott, president in charge 
of the meeting opened by singing 
"Lead on Oh King Eternal," fol- 
lowed with prayer by Mrs. Laura 
Rogers. » 

Alline Brady, program leader 
presented a program from Royal 
Service entitled "A Century of 
Progress in Missions." 

After a business session the pres- 
ident appointed the committees 
for the year! 

Meeting closed with prayer by 
Florence McArthur. 

Next meeting to be held with 
Mrs. Etna McNeely in February. . 
M. C. Sandford, Sec. * 



DOUBLE DUTY 
DOLLARS 



POSTED 

All persons are nerepy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. E. Hentschel, Eas;t Bend road, 
Burlington R." 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

NOTE— Names will be added to 
the 'above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31; 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop! 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 up 

Cold Wwe l 
Permanent >r^ N .$10.00 tip 
Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



M 



...% 



£_} 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i_h= 

I WASHERS REPAIRED I 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

WM. HAGEDORN 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. I 
=7i ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 ( 1 1 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ nniiiiiiiii? 





I 



RIGHT HERE IN OUR OWN FUNERAL HOME 5 

Our display room is located in our own .funeral ' home, thus =5 

offering convenience and privacy for the family served. There =s 

jl._a very complete selection, and each casket on display is ss 

marked In plain figures. == 

Chambers & Grubbs | 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS f WALTON 352 == 

Any person, falling^ to~~receive one of our calenders, please S 
write or call and one will be mailed promptly. 

fffffUffifnifrfififffiiifrffHfffffiiiffiiffiffiffiiiffiiiiiifiiiiiiifffiiiiifffifffifffff^X 



23>^L 



AD l««fln* breed. U.B 
i Blood -te»ted 
k» old. Price 
5 CAT A LOO. Write: 

V) WBT FOURTH STSKET 



. Blood-tasted. started chick, one, two and 
weeks old. Price* right. Alio Bexed chicks. 



right. Alw Bex* 
KtNTUCIOCMA 

e LEXINGTOW.n 




BRBVG YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 
—For Pull Price and Honest 
Weight 

Phone: HEmlock 6135 . „ 
Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



Go To Church 



BELLEVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. W. ■ Guth. Pastor 
Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 
Morning worship 11:30 a. m. 
Evening worship at 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. * 
Everyone IB cordially invited to 
•vttend these services. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Robt. Carter, Paster 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Walnscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:0u a> m. Qllby 
Oreen Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 > a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

Yqu are Invited to come — wor- 
ship an ' work with us. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 

' CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesheir, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedlnger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. ^ 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH . 
Claude R. McDonald. Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. ,R. R. 
Witham, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Sam S. Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 
Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT). 

Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 
p. m. (CWT). 

Prayer services each Wednesday 
evening 8:30 (CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. C 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayep meeting Thursday evening 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially Invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 
S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Carl J. Walnscott, Pastor 

Sunday - School each Sunday at 
10:30 (C. W. TJ Ed Shinkle. Supt. 

Preaching every Sunday at 11:30 
a. m. 

Kvening Service at 7:2U (C.W.T.) 

B. T. U. 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 8:00. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaogn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. at; Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:30. . 

You need your church. 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. • v 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 

Sunday School at ID a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m 
B. T. U. 6^45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. 

Morning Worship at 11:00. 

B. T. 7:15 (CWT) for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship 8:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
8:00 p. m.,, 

you are cordially invited to at 
tend; ^ 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

W.E. Maners, Pastor 

10:00 A. M. Sunday School ... * 

11:00 A. M. Worship. 

.7:30 P. M.'B,T. U. 

8:00 P. M Evangelistic Service. 

8:00 P.„M. Wednesday, Prayer 
and Bible Sturdy. 

Third Monday night, men's meet- 1 
ing. \. ■. 



'IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLD V. LUMDQUIST. D. D. 

Of The Moody Blbls Institute Ot Chicago. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

Lesson for January 14 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



JESUS BEGINS HIS MINISTRY 



LESSON TEXT— Matthew 3:13-4:11. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Thou Shalt worship the 
Lord thy God, and Him only shalt thou 
serve.— Matthew 4:10. 

Ready for service— this is the 
next scene from our Lord's life 
which comes before us in Matthew* 
Thirty years had passed since His 
birth, but these are hidden in 
silence, save for the one glimpse 
of Him in the temple which is given 
only by Luke. 

These were not years of idleness or 
luxury. He_ was obedient to Joseph 
and Mary. He worked hi the carpen- 
ter shop. He fellowshiped with God's 
people, and best of all, with His 
heavenly Father. He showed obedi- 
ence and faithfulness in life's ordi- 
nary things. And then, all at once, 
the day of His public ministry was at 

, hand. 

His baptism and temptation were 

1 a part, the opening event, of that 

i ministry. We find Him: 

I. Identified With Sinners (3:13-15). 
John, the fiery forerunner of Jesus, 

had come with a burning message 
'of repentance, and sinners were 
| coming to him to be baptized as a 
i sign of their contrition. 

Suddenly Jesus appeared. John 

' pointed to Him as the "Lamb of 

' God which taketh away the sin of 

the world" (John 1:29). When He 

offered Himself for baptism, John 

' demurred. There was no sin in 

Jesus that He should need baptism. 

.There was no occasion for. Him to 

express in a special act His obedi- 

| ence, for He always did the will of 

i God. (Heb. 10:H 

Why then was Jesus baptized? We 
; find the answer in the ttentral pur- 
pose for which He came into the 
; world, namely, to save sinners. Here 
; at His official entrance upon that 
work He, who though He knew no 
sin was to become sin for us, took 
the sinner's place in baptism. It was 
not because He had Himself sinned, 
but because He was to become the 
substitute for the sinner. What mar- 
velous condescension and grace! 

II. Approved of God (3:16, 17). 
The Holy Spirit, like a dove, reSt'ed 

upon Him. The dove is one of the 
symbols of the Spirit, and speaks of 
gentleness, meekness, purity, peace 
and love. \ 

Out of the eternal dwelling places 
in heaven came the voice of the 
eternal Father expressing His ap- 
proval and pleasure in His son. 
The person and work of Christ bear 
their own commendation of Hirrr-to 
us as divine. Here we have the Fath- 
er's word, and the Holy Spirit's com- 
ing. Thus we have here the entire 
Trinity. 

III. Tempted by Satan (4:1-11). 
A time of testing was ahead. Jesus 

did not fear it, but notice that He 
did not seek it either. He was led 
by the Spirit into this great conflict. 
We may learn that we must not 
seek nor put ourselves in the way of 
temptation, but when it comes we 
may meet it without fear. God is 
with us. 

He was tempted as the Messiah, 
and the Son of God, and It was a real 
testing, one from which we need to 
learn what to do when tempted. It 
was threefold: physical, spiritual 
and vocational. 

1. The Physical Temptation. 
Forty days of conflict with Satan 
made His body hungry. Under such 
circumstances it was a terrific 
temptation to use His divine powei 
to make bread. He could have done 
it, but He did not. One doesn't have 
to live.cbut one does have to obey 
and honor God. 

Note*tyow effectively Christ used 
Scripture (from Deuteronomy— have 
you read it lately?). It is the only 
sure answer to Satan's temptations, 
but you must learn, it if you are 
going to use it. 

2. The • Spiritual Temptation. 
Here Satan asked Him to presume 
on the grace of God. If he cannot 
get you to abandon your faith, he 
will urge you to go to some fanatical 
and unscriptural extreme in using 

* t 

God always cares for His own 

when they are in the place where 

He wants them to be, but He does 

not deliver us from foolhardy and 

unnecessary risks which we want tc 

Call "faith.". 

3. 'The Vocational Temptation.- 
Christ had come into this world to 
wrest from Satan, the usurper (whe 
is now the "prince of this world- 
John 12:31), the kingdoms, of this 
world. Satan suggested to Him thai 
He could accomplish this by simply 
bowing down to him— thus escaping 
Calvary's cross. 

Satan is busy urging men to take 
spiritual bypaths. He has his own 
leaders who skillfully evade and 
avoid the cross. They have a religion 
without the offense of the cross, but, 
mark it well, it is not Christianity, 
even though it bears that name. 

Jesus met and defeated Satan by 
tb^a use of Scripture, and by honor. 
fng God the Father. Jesus' re- 

- .-. ee of the devil caused him tc 

go away. It still works. Read James 
4:7. Then came the angels to minis- 
ter to Him. Victory over the^ enemy 
of our* souls brings peace and 
spiritual refreshment. 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF JANUARY 7, IMS 



•— — 



Constance 

Miss Denna Coins and Anita 
Hempfllng, of Taylorsport, were 
guests of Mrs. Louis Kottmyer one 
day recently. i ,' 

Miss Celia Anderson and brother 

Charlie were visiting relatives at 

Mt. Auburn, several days recent- 
ly- „ , f — - 

Hathaway 

H. O. Adams and wife enter- 
tained with a delightful party a 
few evenings since. 

Uncle Sam will be petitioned to 
appoint Nicholas Moore postmast- 
er at this place. 

Flickertown 

C. L. and Frank Voshell, of In- 
diana were guests of James White 
and family last Friday and Satur- 
day. , — , ' _ 

Mr. Vel Cook and Miss Stella 
Surface of Dayton, Ohio, spent the 
holidays with Ben Hensley and 
wife. 

Gasburg 

Jimmy Clint Moreland is now a 
resident of this place, having taken 
up his abode with Al Nixon. 

Born to William Burris and wife 
a daughter. 

McVille 

Dave Akin's three little children 
are spending the winter with 
their grandfather, Mr. Hammond 
near Limaburg. 

Born, on the 4th to Bert Staley 
and wife, a boy. 

Waterloo 

Mrs. Laura Clore and two daugh- 
ters spent Sunday at Perry Clore's 
in Bellevue; 

Born to Kirb Conner and wife, 
on the 2nd, a fourteen pound hoy. 
Bellevue 

Charles Maurer and Mrs. Josie 
Grant were married in Newport 
on the 4th. 

Bob Rouse and wife, of Hebron, 
were the guests of Mrs. Corbin a 
couple of days last week. 
Commissary 

Solomon Winkle and family, of 
near Idlewlld spent Saturday night 
and Sunday with Nick Fleek and 
family. ■ 

Jesse Louden and wife, of near 
Bellevue, -visited their cousin Rich- 
ard Lacy and wife, last Sunday. 
Petersburg 

Mrs. Ollie Jones and Mrs.. Jane 



Bailey were married in Lawrence- 
burg, one day last week. 

Ben Calvert, of last Bend, visit- 
ed his sister, Mrs. Agnes Orsnt, 
last week. \ , 

Plattsburg 

Misses G—nia and Nellie Sebre* 
were visiting the Misses Aylor, last 
Saturday and Sunday. 

John Deck and family visited at 
Lewis Sullivan's Sunday. 
Francesville 

William Kilgore who. is em- 
ployed in the city, Is the guest of 
his brother, Harry, near here. 

We are sorry to hear that Ken- 
neth Balsly is still quite low. 
& Hebron 

Mrs. Mary Quick is spending 
several weeks with her son, C. E. 
Quick and son, near Independence. 

Bart Aylor and Miss Daisy Hard- 
ing were quietly married at the 
home of Rev. George A. Miller, in 
Covington, Dec. 28th. 
Verona 

Miss Nannie Hamilton will give 
an elocution and musical enter- 
tainment, Tuesday evening, Jan- 
uary 10. 

Walter Fling's little daughter is 
very low of malaria fever. 
Gunpowder 

L. H. Rouse had a paralytic 
stroke about a week ago. He is 
improving slowly. 

George Barlow and J. H. Tan- 
ner shipped a load of cattle last 
Monday. 

Limaburg 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Kelly were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Hu- 
bert Rouse. V ■ 

Mrs. Wm. GaTfiett and son Earl, 
spent Friday with Mrs. J. Beemon. 
Ft. Pleasant 

Mrs. Charles Allen is visiting 
he» daughter, Mrs. George Brad- 
ford. 

Mrs. W. S. Gordon, of Dayton, 
Ohio, is at home on a visit to her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Youell. 




^j>sar 



OUR JOB 

PRINTING 

IS RIGHT IN 
THE GROOVE 



CONTINUOUS SERVICE §JNCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



r^^VEMBER 

17RT AXrrFP <5dERALHOMEL( 
HiKLAXNtxiliK, | ^-^-BAW K SYSTEM 




KENTUCKY 



New temporary location, next door, in former 
Bentler Drug Store building. . 

3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
beat aU around market 
in the country. We 
* hope you wUl eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES^ Rei^nce? 7 & 

the tint man you meet. 






Sm^*cSS? 



|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuinii| 
| FULL CREDIT | 

given on j|§ 

| ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES = 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



= Phone ERL. 87 



in 



Ambulance Service 




II THARP & STITH 



BLXUTTSVUXE CHRISTIAN 
CMURfE 

Noble Lucati, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 



that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, iegarcUcGs of hqWi modest or how 

elaborate a f uneral\may be, a capable and- sympathetic service 



FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 



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"V ' "" '"" ' " ! 



—^—mmm^^^^m^—m—^—^^^ 



1 ' 



THE BOONS COUNT? 



E 



— > 



—— i 



FLORENCE 



Mrs. Mil Row spent Saturday 
afternoon with Mrs. Sadie Tanner 
and mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Marshall spent 
the Christmas holidays at their 
home on Lloyd Ave. They have 
returned to Cynthlana, where they 
will remain until the close of the 



tobacco season. Bullittsvllle has returned to 

Ben Anten suffered a heart at- enca and will spend a few 
tack at his home in Erlanger, Fri- -with. Mrs. Emma Cleek, of 
day morning. His many jf riends Highway. 
regret to learn of his illness. Mrs. Stanley Lucas is repor 



Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

«71 Dixie Highway 

FLORENCE, KT. 

Phone Florence 126 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Olve your 
hfrir shining luster. We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 



Will Snyder and wife have pur- 
chased the Howard Clegg farm 
near Union and will move there in 
the near future. 

Lavern Arnold who Is stationed 
at Great Lakes, Til., arrived home 
to spend a few days furlough with 
■his wife and son and other rela- 
tives. _ 

Al Griffin and wife have re- 
turned from Florida and are oc- 
cupying rooms with Miss Florence 
Marquis on Burlington Pike. 

Deepest sympathy ls*extended to 
the Kenton family of Limaburg in 
the death of Mrs. Kenton. 

Bert Scott and family, of Wat- 
erloo spent Saturday with. Lon 
Clore and wife. 

Mrs. R. L. Day, who has been 
spending several months with her 
daughter, Mrs. Ruba Whitaker, of 






IIIIIII.IIIIH 

FARMERS-LABORERS 

WORK IN ESSENTIAL INDUSTRY AS 

WAREHOUSEMEN 



All inside work, but bring your heaviest winter 
work clothing. Handle packages of War Time ; 
Foods in COLD STORAGE Rooms. Good i 
{= Wages, Plenty of Overtime. Steady Post- War g 
= Employment. = 



Apply, Ready for Work, at 

MERCHANTS COLD STORAGE CO. 

646 Freeman Avenue, Cincinnati, O. 

Must comply with WMC Regulations 



ll? 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

icHOCKETTco. 

IIXIE HIGHWAY at Graves 



jburbon je 
with modern stores in: 
MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD •MAOISONVILLI 



INCOME TAX PAYERS! 

THREE IMPORTANT DATES: 

JANUARY 15 — Farmers to File Estimate or Final Return. . All 
taxpayers to file amended estimated return if necess 
sary. 

MARCH 15— All Taxpayers to file Final Return. . 

APRIL 15— All taxpayers to file Kentucky Tax Return. 



Competent assistance on these dates will save you time, trouble 
and money. I have the latest Interpretations 
of the law and will give individual 
consideration to your return 



Prepared Returns For Servicemen Free of Charge 



OTWELL RANKIN 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

208 ERLANGER ROAD, 
DIXIE 7784- W ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

P. S. Bring your 1943 return, cancelled checks; income state- 
mens and other necessary records. 



be convalescing after several' 
illness at her residence, , . 

Dad Clutterbuck has been 
fined to his home on Price Pike, 
due to illness. We wish for him 
a speedy recovery, 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Clore and 
family of Newport were dinner 
guests New Year's Day of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lon Clore. 

Friends of Mrs. Amanda Tanner 
regret to learn that she suffered 
Injuries In a fall recently. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett were 
dinner guests last Sunday evening 
of his son Carl Garnett and fam- 
ily; of Ludlow. 

Mrs. Fanny Utz entertained on 
Friday with a dinner party in 
compliment of her niece, Mrs. T, 
B. McHenry. 

Sgt. Francis K. Souther arrived 
home Friday for a fifteen-day fur 
lough with his family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett spent 
Saturday evening with Mrs. Tom- 
my Morris and son, of Cincinnati. 
Eugene Hetzel, of Dixie High 
way, a former resident of Erlanger 
will be ordained Wednesday at 8 
o'clock at the Church of Christ, 
Erlanger. 

Mrs. Mary June Newberry, of 
Erlanger was a welcome visitor 
here, Saturday. 

Friends of Miss Margaret Aylor 
regret to learn she remains in a 
very serious condition at St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital. 

Mrs. Louis Houston was surpris- 
ed on Saturday evening when a 
group of friends and relatives 
gathered at her home to help cel- 
ebrate her birthday annivcersary. 
Pvt. Jack Ward and wife are re- 
ceiving . congratulations over the 
arrival of a fine baby boy at Ft. 
Bragg, N. C. 

Bobbie Surface left Monday for 
Burnside, Ky., where he holds a 
nice position. 

Pvt. Bobby Carpenter, who is 
stationed at Ft. Blanding, Fla., ar- 
rived home for a furlough to visit 
his Wife and parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Gilbert Carpenter. 

Dulton Aylor, who is stationed 
in Texas was called home on ac 
count of the serious illness of nis 
sister, Miss Margaret Aylor. 

Cpl. Howard Martin has been 
graduated from the Army Ah* 
Force flexible gunnery school at 
Tyndell Field. Upon his gradua- 
tion he received a pair of silver 
wings signifying that he is ready 
to take his place as a member of 
the combat crew of an AAF bomb- 
er. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. W. Martin, of Florence. 

Jack Ward arrived home Sunday 
for a four-day furlough with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Ward. 
He is stationed at Ft. Bragg, N. 
C. 

Friends of Mrs. .Minnie Clore 
regret to learn she is on the sick 
list. 

Mrs. John Pierce, of Erlanger 
was the dinner guest Sunday of 
Miss Jane Carpenter. 

Mrs. John Schram and Mrs. Rob- 1 
ert Carter were dinner guests on 
Thursday of Mrs. Ellen Newton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Arnold held 
open house Sunday in compliment 
of their son La*ern Arnold, who is 
stationed at Great Lakes, 111. 

Mrs. O. R. Russ spent Sunday 
evening with Mrs. Emma Aeree. 

Mrs. Evelyn England has ac- 
cepted a position at Mabley's In 
Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
And sons were dinner guests Sun- 
day of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
V. Tanner 

Friends regret to learn that Tom 
Bonar is on the sick list. •• 

Mrs. Gertrude Fossett accom- 
panied some friends on Saturday 
to Tampa, Fla., to enjoy the re- 
mainder of the winter. 

Mrs. Joe Surface, of Carrollton, 
spent last week at the bedside of 
her mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Berger, of the 
Dixie Highway called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Jim Glerm and family, Sun 
day afternoon. 

Allen Utz, son and daughter of 
Devon spent Sunday evening' with 



CMXMXHXM 



faMUylrspe 



his mother Mrs. Carrie Surface. 

This community was saddened 

when news reached here of the 

eath of Yancy Clore who passed 

away at the home of his son Chas. 

Clore, of Hebron. 

Mrs. Elbert Cook and 
spent.; Sunday afternoon 
with Mr. and 1 Mrs. Geo. Bradford 
and family. 

Wm. Feldhaus is enjoying a few 
days' furlough with his sister, Mrs. 
Raymond Newman and family. 
They are 'also entertaining their 
son John Newman, of Great Lakes, 
m. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Cook and 
family and Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Copk and family, of Covington 
spent Sunday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. Elbert Cook and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Houston 
spent Sunday afternoon with Mr. 
and Mrs. Elby a>ringenberg of Dor- 
otha Ave. 

Quite a number of our soldiers 
enjoyed furloughs with their par- 
ents, wives and loved ones during 
the holidays. v 



PETERSBURG r 

(Delayed) 

Mrs. Artie Walton, of Cincinnati, 
spent the Christmas holidays with 
her daughter, Mrs. Perry Carver 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Walton and 
sons, Mrs. Robt. Nelson and Miss 
Theresa Walton spent Christmas 
Day with Miss Edna Berkshire and 
brother. 

Lt. Boyd Mahan spent a few 
days this week with his mother 
and son. He was enroute to Vir- 
ginia from Carlsbad, N. M. 

Jerome Campbell left on Wed- 
nesday after spending a short fur- 
lough at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Chambers, 
Mrs. H. G. Mathews, Miss Laura 
May Mathews and Mr. and Mrj. Al- 
bert Hitzfield were dinner guests 
of Mr .and Mrs. Louis Hitzfield and 
sons on Christmas Day. 

Junior and Patricia Helms en- 
tertained with a party on Satur- 
day night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jarboe and 
daughters - entertained with , a 
Watch Party on New Year's Eve. 

Mrs. Perry Mahan and grand- 
son Joe are visiting her relatives 
in Indiana. 

Mrs. Mary Love returned home 
on Saturday a/ter spending^ the 
holidays with her son, DfLESJ* 
Love and family. } 

Mr. and Mrs. Cleve Rector were 
called to Aurora on Wednesday on 
account of the illness of their 
daughter, Mrs. Ray McCardle. 

Bennle Jarrell and Bob Houze 
are enjoying a furlough with their 
parents. 

Mrs, Albert Stephens and Mrs. 
Perry Carver entertained the 
young folks witlta party on Wed- 
nesday evening at the school aud- 
itorium. 

Miss Joanna Gordon has been on 
the sick list the past week. 

Mrs. Ralph Bradburn is visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Bradburn and 
Mrs. Kenneth Rogers and son. 

Repairs are progressing nicelyon 
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Stott's hou]to. 

Mrs. Grant Williamson is visit- 
ing her brother Willis* Smith and 
family. 

Miss Laura May Mathews has 
been appointed as temporary Post- 
mistress to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of Perry Mahan. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Berkshire 
spent Christmas Day with the B. 
H. Berkshires; 



W. W. GAINES WRITES 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter, from W. W. Gaines, Law- 
yer of Atlanta, Ga.: 
"Editor Boone County Recorder 
Burlington, Ky. 
"Dear Mr. Editor: 

"Enclosed find check covering 
my subscription for another year. 
I suspect that I am one of your 
longest- time subscribers. Some 
fifty-five years ago I was your Bul- 
littsvllle correspondent. After fin- 
ishing my college courses I came 
to Atlanta, where I have now been 
for fifty-three years. During all 
that time I have been a subscriber 
to my Boone County paper. I read 
it with interest every week. I look 
for the Bullittsvllle news, where I 
still have some relatives — the Mrs. 
Mary V. Gaines family and others. 
The Bullittsburg Baptist Church, 
of which I was a member is also in 
that neighborhood. Then I read 
the Unon news, to see what I can 
find about the Hueys, relatives also. 
And I scan the Petersburg, Hebron 
and Constance news where many 
cherished friends of the long ago 
lived. My sister, Mrs Lutie Graddy, 
the only surviving member of my 
immediate family, until recently 
lived in the Bullittsvllle neighbor- 
hood with one of our Winston kin, 
Mrs Mayme Stephens (my mother 
was a Winston). 

"So you see why I read the 
Boone County Recorder each week 
from cover to cover. 

"With every* good wish, 

Very truly yours, 

W. W. Gaines." 



Station have been invaluable to 
agriculture. He has made many 
contributions to stockralslng and 
Kentucky appreciates the honor 
accorded him by the Cuban gov- 
ernment.'' 



Boon e Cou nty Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF O. P. DTE, DECEASED 

The Administrator of the estate 
of O. P. Dye. deceased, has filed 
bis settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any person having 
exceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before Fberuary 
5, 1945 (next regular term of Coun- 
ty Court). 

^CTD. BENSOH, CWrk, 
Boone County Court 



J NOTICE 
The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
•the War Production Board If you 
are Interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 




Madison Fvnhre 
Store 




432-434 
Covington, 



KENTUCKY SCIENTIST 

IS HONORED BY CUBA 

Dr. W. W. Dimock, head of the 
Department of Animal Pathology 
at the University of Kentucky Ex- 
periment Station, was one of four 
American scientists recently grant- 
ed honorary degrees by the Uni- 
versity of Havana in Cuba. 

After graduating from Cornell 
University Dr. Dimock was a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the University 
of Havana and also chief veterin- 
arian of the Cuban National Board 
of Health. From that position he 
went to the Iowa State College at 
Ames and from there came to Ken- 
tucky. 

Widely known for his investiga- 
tions of livestock diseases, Dr. 
Dimock has made a special study 
of horse breeding problems and of 
parasites of horses. From 1031 to 
1938 he made eight trips to Eng- 
land under the auspices of the 
British Blood Stock Agency to ad- 
vise) with breeders in the English 
light horse industry. 

"The honor which the University 
of Havana bestowed on Dr. Dim- 
ock is a recognition of his long 
service to the livestock industry," 
said Dean Thomas P. Cooper of 
the Experiment Station. "His 25 
years of work at the Experiment 



Income Tax Service To Fanners! 

Farmers, if you have a gross income of $500 or 
more the Federal Revenue Department says you 
must file an income tax declaration by January 
15. . You may save the trouble of filing this $pt- 
laration if you file your 1944 income tax return 
by Jan. 15 instead of waiting until March 15. 
Let me help you to file your return. Rates Rea- 
sonable. Office No. 1, Lloyd Ave*, Florence, Ky., 
evenings 6 to 10 except I will have no office 
hours from Dec. 28 to Jan. 1 inclusive. 
CONSTANCE office hours evenings Jan. 11 and 
12 at the school house 6:30 to 9:00. Bring all last 
year's tax duplicates and 1944 forms. 

R. V. LENTS 

PHONE FLORENCE 116 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHI 
| JANUARY 15th 

THE LAST DAY FOR FILING YOUR 1944 
INCOME TAX RETURN 

■ without incurring any penalty charges if there is a variance 
= between your estimated tax and the actual tax due. For 

■ prompt and effective compliance with the New Tax Lav, 
= consult 

m ISRAEL ARON 

TAX CONSULTANT - ACCOUNTANT and AUDITOR 

■ 32 East Seventh St. Hlland 2718 Coving ton, 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIHIHHH 






«► 




* 






A LETTER 



■£. 



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Pitts 



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The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 



ERLANGER 



KENTUCKY 



TREAT EVES KINDLY 

It has been said that 
"Reading maketh a full man." 
With clear vision and com- 
fortable eyes, you will get 
more pleasure, and benefit 
from reading. 

Give your eyes the best 
kind of treatment — they are 
too precious to neglect. Have 
them exami"" J ■ _„,. w 1U : B6 
~l s u or eye discomfort or 
poor vision. 

'We have the necessary 
modern equipment and long 
experience to give you reli-- 
able optical service. Our 
many pleased patrons are 
our best advertisement. 




We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from E. S. Ryle, East New 
Market, Md.: 

"I believe the following to be 
of interest to all your readers re- 
lated to the Ryle family. 

"I have in my possession a copy 
of the last will and testament of 
John Ryle, father of John and 
James Ryle who came into Boone 
County, Ky., about 1795. The will 
is dated JanuaigT 8, 1777 and was 
probated Jan. 6, 1778. He had 8 
children, James, Elizabeth, John, 
Whitmill, Larkin and Mary. He 
willed each a fllave and one bed 
and furnished and an equal share 
in the estate. > 

"Four of these children came in- 
to Kentucky, ,Ja'mes, John, Larkin 
and*Mary Ann. The latter married 
a Scott and had two sons. When 
Scott was killed by a horse she 
married a Pressor and had two 
sons. Larkin was a bachelor. 

"The family name was spelled 
Ryle by the signer himself in the 
presence of three witnesses. 

"I am now tracing for a con- 
nection between this John who was 
born possible around 1735 and a 
Thomas Ryle who came into Vir- 
ginia as a colonist in 1635. 

"It appears the Ryles were 
Scotch, yet the elder John's son, 
married a Hogan who was no doubt 
Irish. 

j*So far as I have been able to 
establish all the Ryles in Boone 
County descended from James 
Ryle except John P. Ryle's chil- 

rii-nn TitVinoo mnf.hpr was of t,he first 

John Ryle line and myseu. * ah 
the other John Ryle male descend- 
ants left Boone County. They were 
Long Billy, Whit and Marins and 
Willie Clyde. 

"The daughters of the first John 
Ryle in Boone married', one a 
Craig, one a Willis, one a Pearson, 
one a Kendall in Western Tennes- 
see^ -^ 

"Aftyone able to furnish inform- 
ation on this history please write 
to me." 



OO 

Will Save You Money And Give 
You The Following Benefits: 






The average family saves $60.00 to $100.00 per year by us- 
ing locker service. 

V 



2. You can butcher anytime of the year— summer or winter. 



— 



75 Percent less work required than in canning fruits and 
vegetables. 

Preserve the garden-fresh flavor and food value of your 



own fruits and vegetables. 



f 



5. A locker will serve as your stock of fresh fruits, vegetables 

and meats. One locker will hold a quarter of beef and one 

hog or approximately 100 frying chickens or the equivalent 

$p in fresh fruits and vegetables. Restocked as needed it will 

serve as a year round supply of fresh fruits. 



6. 



You can serve roasting ears, fresh cantaloupe or 
chicken for Christmas or any time during the year. 



fried 



IHXMx" 



tvfc. w *%. rttrrin 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



• nnAnmr w 

-_- ^ A FAUIiUl WUU LU11YER 

WILL GIVE YOU ALL OF THESE ADVANTAGES * 

AND^STJLL SAVE YOU MONEY 

GIVE IT YOUR SUPPORT! 



™ 



= 



»™ 



1 ' 



1 \ ■ 



HDMMT, JANUARY It, IMS 



THE BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



UNION 



Muter Tom Mataon Huey return- 
ed Saturday from A week's visit 
with -hi* grandparents, the T. A. 
Hueya at their home on Big Bonk 
Road. The continued Illness of 
Mr. Huey Is A matter of regret to 
his friends. 

•fin Martha Emily Brlstow has 
returned to Detroit, following a 
pleasant vacation with her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. James Thornton 
Brlstow. 

Mrs. Ralph R Barlow left Sun- 
day for Montgomery, Ala., to be 
with her father J. Walter Mills who 
is gravely ID. She was accompani- 
ed by Miss Frances Barlow who 
will stay for a brief visit with 
friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Feldhaus 
were week-end guests of the Ray- 
mond Newmans at their home on 
Mt Zkra Road. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charley Smith had 
with them over the week-end their 
son Pvt. Wendell Smith, stationed 
at Camp Knox. 

Mrs. Raymond Newman enter- 
tained a group of relatives and 
friends Sunday with a charmingly 
appointed dinner, honoring her son 
8 S-c John Newman, USTC, Qreat 
Lakes, and brother Pfc. William 



Feldhaus, Cochran Field, Macon, 
Ga. 

Sgt. George Barr and Mrs. Ban- 
have returned to Greensboro, N. C. 
after a two weeks' furlough spent 
with their kindred in the village 
and Newman, 111. * 

Mrs. William Bailer, who has 
been enjoying a visit with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Crad- 
dock, has returned to her home in 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Mr. and Mrs 



daughter, Miss Marion Grater, who 
has been in the village the past 
several weeks, left Monday for 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



HEBRON 



?ed from 
rs. Ida 
wounded 



Word has been r 

Sgt. James Watts, son of 

Watts that; he has been 

in action in Belgium. 

Mrs! Emily Furnish spent a few 

Linnie Love had i days last week with her parents at 



with them the past week their son 
S-Sgt. Alfred Love, now stationed 
in Columbus, Ohio, . following 
months of active duty in the Eur- 
opean Theater of War.^- 

Sgt. John Robert Ballard, who 
has been with the fighting forces 
In Italy the past 33 months, is en- sudden illness Saturday. At last 
Joying a much needed rest with his j report she was very much improv- 
mother, Mrs. Jimmy Carver and|ed. J 

Mr. Carver. Mr. and Mrs. James Tanner 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Huey enjoyed ! spent Saturday and Sunday at 
having with them during the- past Dayton, O. 

Hossman, 



Science Hill, Ky. 

Chas. Ritchie, who was 111 of 
pneumonia last week, was removed 
to tlje home of his brother In Cin- 
cinnati. 

The many friends of Mrs. E. S. 
Graves were grieved to hear of her 



week, Mr. and Mrs. John Oliver 
Taylor and the Misses Katherine 
and Jean Taylor, of Louisville. 

Pfc. Lucille Doane, WAC Detach- 
ment, has returned to Camp Ruck- j 
er, Ala., following a fifteen-day 
furlough with her friends and 
family in the community. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Grater's 



\ 



r 



ALWAYS... 
COPPIN'S 



-— - . J !»■■ ■ „ ..,,. ^j 



FOR 



SOMETHING 

NEW 

COFFIN'S 

MADISON AT 7TH 
COVINGTON,' -*T"\ KENTUCKY 



Louis C. Hossman, who is in 
training at Great Lakes, returned 
home last Thursday for a week. 

Bro. Paul Rimmer and Mrs. Rim- 
mer were the guests Saturday 
night of Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn 
Hempfling. 

Wilbur Shinkle, of Hooven, Ohio, 
spent Saturday night with Mr. and 
Mrs. Junior Shinkle and Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Garnett. 

Yancey Clore passed away Sat- 
urday night at the home of his 
son Charles, after several weeks' 
illness. He is survived by two sons, 
William, of Covington and Charles 
The children have the sympathy of 
their many friends in their be- 
reavement. 

Mrs. Howard Acra entertained 
the Missionary Society of the Bul- 
littsville 'Christian Church, Satur- 
day. 

Friends here of Pvt. Clarence 
Chipley were grieved to hear he 
had been killed in action. 

At the regular annual business 
[meeting of the Lutheran Church 
jon Saturday, the following officers 
(were re-elected: Deacons, Liston 
Hempfling, Harold' Crigler and Al- 
bert Rogers; financial secretary, 
John Conner; organist, Mrs. Omer 
Dolwick; assistant organist, Mrs. 
Woodford Crigler, choirister, Wood- 
ford Crigler. 



The Checkerboard 
Trade Mark Had a 
3 Very Simple Start 



Often we've been attracted by that 
popular Checkerboard trade mark that 
is a part of the sign identifying one of 
_ayj* local feed stores and on the bags 
ana containers In which its feeds, con- 
centrates and sanitation products are' 
packed. But how did it get started? 

You're wrong if you've guessed it 
was to the bags could be used for play- 
ing a game of checkers out in the barn 
on a rainy day. According to William 
H. Danforth, founder of Purina Mills, 
their checkerboard trademark had a 
simple, yet rather amusing, beginning, 



WOMAN HELPS ON FARM 



i Canning about 700 quarts of food 

for her family of four was only one 

of the jobs done by Mrs. Ernest 

I Searcy, a homemaker in Carroll 

! county. She assisted her husband 

j and daughter," 16, to grow^and 

i house 4,300 sticks of tobacco, then 

j she grew 30 different vegetables in 

| her garden and did all the sewing 

for the family. 







/ 



ELECTRIC 

POWER 
help i Imibi 

\ ; SITING 
POWEB 



Uoni want ttecsrtCUJ put 
because it's cbtap and isn't 
rationed. There's plenty to 
me, but none to waste. 



No, we don't deliver electricity to his foxhole, but 
we do serve him indirectly by supplying power for 
producing important materials of war he needs so 
vitally. 

Every year since the war began, we have been dis- 
tributing more and more power for war produc- 
tion. * 

Today approximately three-fifths of our entire out- 
put goes to industries essential to the war effort 
and to military establishments. Six out of every 
10 kilowatt-hours we deliver help back the attack. 

Some day our No. 1 Customer will be home again, 
and then our big job will be contributing to his 
peacetime better living. But until that day our 
unuu uu»uic»» is power ioi wu piuuucuuu — auu 
we're devoting our full energies and resources to 
the job. 



Wm. H. Danforth, founder of th« 
checkerboard trade mark. 

It was a boyhood experience that gave 
Mr. Danforth his checkejrWoard idea. 
When a boy he waited on customers in 
his father's general store in southeast- 
ern Missouri. There he learned many 
valuable lessons that were to serve 
him well in his business career. "But 
the most important thing I learned be- 
hind the counter in that country store 
where we sold everything from linen 
handkerchiefs to horse collars, was 
this," Danforth smilingly recalls — "I 
learned the importance of 'dress.' And 
I learned that lesson from the mother 
of a large family in our community. 

"Among the many articles we handled 
in our store was 'bolt goods,' mostly old- 
fashioned calicos and sturdy ginghams. 
Along in the spring of the year busi- 
ness picked up in this line of goods. 
Customers swarmed into the store to 
buy dress materials. Usually they pur- 
chased enough materia* to outfit the 
whole family. Prom the same bolt 
would be made shirts for the father 
and all the boys, and dresses and aprons 
for all the girls. Most of the women 
who traded with us chose modest pat- 
terns and varied them from year to 
year. But not Mrs. Brown. Mother of 
a large brood of tow-headed boys and 
girls of all ages, Mrs. Brown had one 
invariable choice in spring material. 
In all the time she traded with us she 
didn't, so long as I remember, swerve 
from her standard. She always bought 
a bolt of heavy red-checked gingham. 
You can imagine the appearance of the 
Brown family when they came out in 
their new spring wardrobe," Danforth , 
recounts. 

. "Mrs. Brown headed the crew be- 
decked in her red-checked dress. Mr. 
Brown supported her with a red check- 
erboard shirt. And through the whole 
family the design was repeated— red- 
checked dresses for every girl, red- 
checked shirts for the boys. 

"It was a striking appearance this 
family made. They were conspicuous 
from afar. Other mothers might tem- 
porarily lose eight of a child or two 
at an ice cream social or a basket- 
dinner. But not Mrs. Brown. She 
could spot a Brown offspring in any 
crowd. And so could everyone else. 

"Before long the Brown family in 
that community became indelibly asso- 
ciated with red checkerboard gingham," 
Danforth says, "and from that family 
I learned that to make a thing stand 
out you have to dress it to fit the part. 
And I also learned that dressing alike 
gives a unity and identification lacking 
In helter-skelter design." 

Years later when Danforth, fresh 
from college campus, decided to en- 
ter the feed manufacturing business, 
he remembered how a Brown was never 
mistaken for anyone else to the com- 
munity. So he decided to dress his 
products so they would never be com* 
fused with those made by others. Thus 
was born the checkerboard trademark 
that, through 47 years, has increasingly 
gained popularity, and Is a part of the 
sign that identifies our local feed store 
that handles checkerboard feeds, con- 
centrates, and sanitation products. 



Did you know that there are few bad 
habits known to a bird dog that can 
spoil a day in the field more effectively 
than refusal to "back". Not only will a 
dog which commits this fault make a 
nuisance of himself on a hunt, but also 
he is likely to destroy the results, .of 
weeks of careful training in any dog 
which has the misfortune to be worked 
with him. In short a dog owner owes 
It to himself and his hunting friends to 
correct such a habit in bis dog as soon 
as it becomes evident. 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE CO 



INCORPORATED 



"Handling Your Hunting Dog" by J. 
Earl Bufkin, hunter, professional dog 
trainer, and field trial handler at Como, 

nii.^n.i«n( <o nhtnlnohle fnr a. nnmlrnl 

price wherever .Purina uog onow is soia. 
It treats on such subjects as "Handling 
On The Hunt," "Correcting Faults," 
"Training The Young Dog," "Amateur 
Field Trial, Handling," "Feeding and 
Conditioning," and "Keeping the Dog 
Clean and WelL" 



GAYETV 
THEATRE 1 

ERLANGER, ELSMERE. KY 



FREE PARKING LOT 



TONIGHT — 

JANUARY 11TH 



FRIDAY 

AND 12TH 





Also Battl for The Mariannas and 

Comedy 

Feature Starts 7:45, 9:27 



SATURDAY 

JANUARY 13TH 
Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 




HAMILTON 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood and 
son Sgt. Charles R. Wood were the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Alva Wood 
and daughter New Year's Day. 
- Mrs. Mary Wood and daughter 
Sarah Bell called on Mrs. Dorothy 
Wood and daughter Carol Lee, Sat- 
urday. 

Mrs. Georgia Ryle called on Mr. 
and Mrs. John Hartman, Friday. 
■Mr Wartmnn is suffering from 
cuts on hie face, he received in a 
fall on the Ice Friday. 

Mrs. mile Huff spent Thursday 
with her aunt, Miss Maggie Taylor 
of unlonr - ~ —<r^ 

Miss Wilma Huff was the guest 
of her aunt? Mrs. Orene Black, on 
Wednesday and Thursday. 

Mrs. Anna Huff called on Mrs. 
Bertha Huff on Friday. Saturday 
callers of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff 
were Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Ryle, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff and 
daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett; Jones and 
sons Virgil and Dorothy Shields, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Stephens and 
children, Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Shields and children, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Aylor and son, Waller Jones 
and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Shields 
and son were, Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Beckham Shields and 
children wh» entertained in honor 



of their son Bobby, who baa com- 
pleted his 'boot" training at Great 
Lakes, and Is enjoying an eight- 
day furlough at home. Mr. and 

Mrs. J. W. Aylor were ai*u guests 
at the home of, the Shields. 

" ■ ' I 

LOWER GUNPOWDER 

Mrs. Clifford Rouse spe»F the 
week-end with her mother, Mrs. 
Maud Hodges, of East Bend. 

Mr. and Mrn. Bill rynAmm «*«* Jn 
Covington Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff and 
daughter spent Monday night <rf\ 
Christmas week with hia. parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sebree. 

Mrs. Dortha Williams has return- 
ed from Little Rock, Ark., where 
she spent a few days with her hus- 
band Tommy Williams, who is sta- 
tioned there. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Sebree spent 
Friday of last week with their 
daughter and husband, Mrs. Har- 
old Love^ 

School reopened Monday after a 
week's delay due to the condition 
of the roads. 

We extend sympathy to Mrs. 
Tom Ross in the loss of her hus- 
band. 

Russell Miller, Jr., received an 
honorable discharge from the army 
due to an eye condition. 



Chapter 7 "Flying Cadets" Cartoon 

Feature Starts: 

2:48, 4:35, 6:25, 8:14, 10:04 



SUNDAY anH MONDAY 

JANUARY 14TH AND 15TH 

Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:30 p 



m, 



GREER 



GARSON 



WALTER 



PIDGEdN 



M-G-M's 



Also Latest News 

Feature Starts: 

Sunday; 2:31, 5:05, 7:16, 9:32 

Monday, 7:00, 9:29 



TUESDAY 

JANUARY 16TH 
DOUBLE FEATURE 



MURDIR Irt 

PARADISE! 



mm | 



RUTHERFORD 
lUTTERVOITll 



— Also — 




H OWABO 



-..,BO S 



Sm'kw* 



WED., and THURSDAY 
FRIDAY 

JANUARY 17, 18 AND 19TH 




PIKE'S! 



36. PIKE STREET 



i 



: 



STORE 

COVINGTON, KY. 

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! J 

ANNUAL CLEARANCE • 

SPECIALS FOR EVERYONE! 

FOR HER 

LADIES' COTTON SWEATERS $| .98 

Regular $2.49 and $2.98 now * 

LADIES' 100% ALL WOOL SWEATERS. But- 
ton down, slipover, sleevless and short $^.98 

sleeves. Regular'$^98-3.49 now ™ 

Super-Sheer Evening Dress Hose 96© ' 

FOR HIM 

SWEATSHIRTS 98c 

COTTON KNIT WORK SOX, extra QOf 

heavy. 15c per pair 6 pair ^^^ 

FACTORY WORKER SPECIAL SOX $ f .00 

With cusion sole, 35c 3 pr. ■■ 

FOR MISS 

LONG COTTON HOSE 29c ftC* 

3 for only 0«JI* 

ANKLETS With ribbed and elastic ^C r 

tops, 6-10«/ 2 fc«#t* 

BEAUTIFUL PRINT DRESSES ?... .79c 

FOR JUNIOR 

DANDY PART WOOL PANTS ..., $2.49 



: 



I 



• • • * ••••*••■••• 



POLO SHIRTS, long sleeves 98c 

LOUD COLORS FANCY SOX ...35c 

EAR MUFFS, real fur v ...... ........79c 

Come in and look around. 

Visit the most complete Baby Department 

ELASTIC BY THE YARD & GARTER RUBBER 






>•* 



-" — -» ~ 



Antique Collector 

Wants old kerosene lamps, furniture, dishes, col- 
ored glass, ornaments, guns, coins, music boxes. 

Best Prices Paid 

~ S. D. HEMPFLING 

Constance, Ky., or Box 110A, RFD 2 Ludlow, Ky, 



■-: 



I 



Mrs. N. B. Alexander of the 
Round Pond Club in Simpson 
county grew 31 vegetables In her 
garden. 

The number of pressure cookers 
in Caldwell county has increased 
from two in 1936 to 347 In 1944. 



Also Flashoack Comedy ~ 
Feature Starts 7:09, 9:21 



INVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
BUT WAR BONDS 

— — We Issue Them— 



Used Cars 

MANY ARE GUARANTEED! 
'40 CHYSLER SEDAN, 8-passenger ... . 1490.00 

'36 PONTIAC COUPE 350.00 

'34 CHVEROLET COACH 175.00 

'40 DODGE TUDOR 963.00 

'37 BUICK SEDAN :. 500.00 

'W PT VWUTTW f!OTTPrc 175.00 

'36 CHEVROLET PANEL TRUCK... 255.00 

'38 OLDSMOBILE 4-DOOR TRUNK 

SEDAN 650.00 

'37 OLDSMOBILE CLUB COUPE, 405.00 

'36 DODGE COUPE .....; 1 350.00 

'34 NASH SEDAN , 150.00 

'37 TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



\ 



" 



^™» 



«i» 



^^^— ^! 



— — 



^™ 



•VBMBMH 



TIB BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, Ell f UHaU 



" 



itiHiHiHUHiiiiiiiiiiifiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiinitfiiiiiiiiimHnHiiiiHiimiHiiiiiiiHiiiiiii^ 1 ^^^r^ ^^^^^^^^rp^^Sr 1 ?^. ^^S 

C A f V E 1 A 1 i Mrs - *** Barlow, of Union, 

been And Heard Around 



| t he County Seat ] 

^illlllllllllllllllllllllllllliiiim 



Mrs. Klrtley Cropper and two 
sons spent Friday In Cincinnati. 



Miss Hattie White suffered slight 
injuries when she fell In her home 
one day last week. 



Miss Evelyn Rothmueller, of Cm- 
clnatl, spent the week-end with 
Mrs. Helen Snyder. 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Kelly, of 
Florence' were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kelly. 



Mrs. Laura Martin 
home last week and 
broken wrist. 



fell at her 
suffered a 



Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Fields are the 
proud parents of a daughter, horn 
Friday, January 5th. 



Leon E. Ryle 82/c recently re- 
turned to Shoemaker, California, 
after spending a nine-day leave 
with his wife and daughter at their 
home in Erlanger. 



OWN YOUR OWN HOME 



"1 

I 

H 

f 



N 

X 



SI 

H 

X 
H 

X 



If you have a reasonable amount to pay down on a 
home or a farm, come in and talk with us. We may 
be able to help you. We are anxious to make mort- 
gage loans and will take pleasure in discussing the 
matter with you. 

We will not encourage you to go in debt beyond 
your ability to pay, over a reasonable period of 
years. 

The interest rate will be 5%. Our discussion con- 
fidential. 



£ 

N 

X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
M 
X 
H 
X 
i4XHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXKXHXHXHXHXHXHXHSHXK 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY* 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $150,000.00 



U MmMmM immmmmmmmjmm 





ENLISTS FOR ACTIVE SERVICE 

The women of America have answered the call 
to active service. You'll find them wherever 
there's work to be done. Their pretty, capable 
hands plot the courses of enemy planes . . . roll 
bandages . . . administer First Aid . . . drive am- 
bulances ... but their nails are bright, brave 
red I Working in war industries or planning 
vitamin-studded meals, the women of America 
have shown themselves ready to meet any em- 
ergency . . . and able to stay downright pretty 
through it all"! • 

Plan YOUR beauty care to suit your active war- 
time life. Have a really fine permanent to save 
Erecious time ... a versatile short coiffure for 
usiness-like days and star-spangled evenings. 
For your own morale . . . for the inspiration of 
your men in service ... be as alert and smart and 
beautiful as ever! This is part of your war job. 

La Rose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Colling, Prop. 



i; ,•'». m m m m »»■■< wt m m m m m »>•-. m »>■■, »v, m »<■■/ m »v, in m mmi wi/s 



The Home Store 

HIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIUIlllllllllllllllllllllHIIILUIIllllllllHMIIIII 

WAR BONDS 



Mrs. Lucy Finnell suffered a 
broken collar bone when she fell 
on the Ice, last Tuesday. 



George Morlth, of Florence was 
a pleasant caller -at The Recorder 
office Saturday. Mr. Morlth Is an 
employee of the Cincinnati Post. 



Mrs. William Townsend and Miss 
Mary Hood GUlasple spent last 
Saturday at the Army Air Force 
Hospital, In Ft. Thomas. 

■ '. i — » > ' 



Mary Jane-Pettit and Mrs. 
Mary Louise Burnett, left Monday 
morning to spend a week In New 
York City. 



Miss Mary Belle Smith of George- 
town-College spent the week-end 
with her parents, Rev. and Mrs. 
Wm. Smith. 



Mr. and Mrs. Stephens, of Illi- 
nois, spent several days last week 
with Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth Ryle 
and son. 



Mrs. Harry Holtzclaw and two 
children left Monday morning for 
their home in Dayton, O., after 
spending a week with her father, 
W. L. Cropper. 



McVILLE 



Stewart Ryle returned to army 
duties Saturday, after a much en- 
joyed furlough with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Rod Ryle. 

Billie Kruse is enjoying a 30-day 
furlough with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wm. Kruse and, relatives. 

Seaman Robert Williamson is 
spending a few days', furlough with 
his wife and children at home. 

Walter Buckler, who recently was 
inducted into the army is station- 
ed at Camp Atterbury, Ind. -^Mary 
Frances Buckler has been staying 
with Mrs. Walter Buckler and chil- 
dren. 

"Mrs. Anna Ryle, who spent sev- 
eral weeks' with Mr. and Mrs. Ver- 
non Scott and sons has returned to 
her home near Rabbit Hash. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Smith are 
spending a few months with their 
daughter, Mrs. Hubert West, Mr. 
West and daughter. 

Robert Smith was visiting his 
parents and other relatives here 
over the week-end. 

Cliff Sutton remains ill. Mrs. 
Sutton has been quite indisposed 
the past few days. 

Clad to report Mrs. Stella Scott 
and Mrs. Carl Cason much improv- 
ed after several weeks of la grippe. 

Miss Carla Mae Grlesser spent 
Thursday night and Friday with 
her cousin, Vera Dean Scott. Vera 
Dean spent the next few days with 
Carla Mae. 

Mrs. Wm. Kruse has been helping 
to care for her new grandson, little 
Stephen Smith at Belleview. 

Mrs. Vernon Scott spent Thurs- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Sut- 
ton. 

Several of the women from here 
attended the W. M. U.. meeting at 
the home of Mrs. Clara Hensley at 
Belleview, Wednesday. / 



PETERSBURG 



Mrs. Lena Grant is spending the 
winter with Mrs. Wesley Fogle. 

The Women's Missionary Society 
of the Christian Church met with 
Mr*. H. O. Mathews and daughter 
for an all-day meeting on Thurs- 
day. 

Mrs. Irene Hensley is improving 
nicely from severe laceration on 
her face received while sleigh rid- 
ing on Tuesday evening. Miss 
Frances Bbnta also was slightly in- 
jured In the accident. ,, 

June Brown, of Burlington Is 
spending a' few days with Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Stephens. 

Frank Antras returned to his 
work on Friday after being con- 
fined at home for two weeks due 
to an injury to his foot. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Berkshire 
spent the week-end with the B. H 
Berkshires. 

Mrs. Stella Gaines and Mrs. Ida 
Thompson have been on the sick 
list the past few days. 

The remains of Everett Jones 
were brought 'here for burial on 
Saturday. Everett attended school 
here for several years. We extend 
sympathy to his family. 

Mrs. Earl Acra is improving slow 
ly from the Injury she received to 
her arm in a fall, recently. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Berkshire en 
tertained Rev. and Mrs. Claude 
MacDonald over the week-end. " 

M. K. Toadvine and family re 
turned home on ^Saturday, after 
spending the holidays with his rel- 
atives at Cynthiana. 

Mrs. E. E. Gordon was shopping 
in "Aurora, on Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Meyers and 
children, Mrs. Eva Carver and Miss 
Elizabeth Walton were dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Perry Carv- 
er on New Years Eve. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bonta en- 
tertained with dinner on Sunday 
evening, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Willis 
arid son Charles, Miss Frances 
Bonta, Eugene Bonta and the host 
and hostess. f, 

The candlelight service at the 
Christian Church on Sunday night 
was enjoyed by all present. 



GASBURG 



Farmers in Ohio county are find- 
ing that a few acres »of crimson 
clover provide pasture for lambs in 
early spring before lespedeza is 
ready. J 



■ . ■ 

. JELLIES, CRANBERRY SAUCE 1 lb. 40 pt.s 25c 

'{VAN CAMPS CH1U CON CARNE 1 lb. 1 oz. 40c 

ZIGLER S PEACHES '. 60 points 28c 

WHITE VILLA APRICOTS .40 points 37c 

WHITE VILLA FRUIT COCKTAIL ...I.. 60 points 37c 

WHITE VILLA APPLE SAUCE 20 points 18c 

APPLE CHERRY PRESERVES 2 lbs. 50c 

APPLE RASPBERRY PRESERVES .2 lbs. 35c 

SWEET MIXED PICKLES 15 oz. 32c 

SWEET GREEN SLICED TOMATO PICKLES jar 33c 

I VEGETABLE RELISH 13% M | 25c 

BOYS' LEATHER JACKETS .,., $8.50 

1 MANS' SUEDE JACKET, size 42 $8.5© 

1 MEN'S LEATHER JACKET, size 40 * $10.50 

— — — — -^— — — — ^— — — — — — — — — — — _ _ __ . 

100 LB. SHELLED CORN $2.80 

100 LB. CRACKED CORN $2.90 

100 LB,, SCRATCH FEED , .$3.25. 

100 LB. 32% DAIRY ." '...'. ■ .$3.30 

100 LB. 24% DAIRY : . „. .$3.20 

100 LB. DEARBORN HOG and PIG RATION $3.50 

1 100 LB. 16% DAIRY $3.06 

100 LB. WHEAT MIDDLINGS $2 t g 5 

100 LB. MIX FEED „ $2.65 

100 LB. DEARBORN LAYING MASH „__^ m ^- rT , TrT , . . gs.gg 



LADY NEARLY CHOKED 
WHILE LYING IN BED- 
DUE TO STOMACH GAS, 

One lady said a few days ago 
that she used to be afraid to go to 
bed at night. She was swollen with 
stomach gas, which always got 
worse when she went to bed, and 
the gas would rise up In her throat 
after she lay down and would 
nearly choke her. She couldn't lie 
flat. Had to prop herself up on 
pillows. Recently this lady got 
ERB-HELP and now says gad is 
gone, stomach feels fine, bowels are 
regular and she can go to bed and 
sleep soundly. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable people 
soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. 

^ i 



Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son called on Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
Leek and son Paul, of Petersburg, 
Saturday evening. Paul returned 
home with them for the week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Ovit Webster one 
night recently. 

Mrs. Nat Rogers Is somewhat im- 
proved very much to the delight 
of her friends. * 

Master Ronnie Burcham spent 
one night last week with his grand- 
parents, Mr. and Sherman Burch- 
am of Belleview. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles White and 
Mr. and Mrs. Everett Wolfe butch- 
ered hogs last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham and 
children spent Sunday .with rela- 
tives in Cincinnati, Ojtilo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Snyder re- 
ceived news Saturday night that 
Lt. and Mrs. Harry Brassfield are 
entertaining a daughter at Jewish 
Hospital, Cincinnati. 

Quite a few from this neighbor- 
hood have been on the Covington 
tobacco market this past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
daughter were recent guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Burns. 

•John Klopp fell on the ice one 
day last week injuring his- head. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Fleek and 
children spent last week-end with 
Mr. and Mrs. Amual Hensley, of 
Idlewild. 

Paul Leek fell while visiting his 
sister, Mrs. E. E. Klopp, injuring 
his nose. 

Asst. County Agent Robinson 
called on Lloyd Siekman, Saturday 
morning. 



Frank Snow Tuesday evening. - 

Bro. Hamilton called on Frank 
Estes, Sunday afternoon. 

Yancy Clore passed away at the 
home of his son Charles Clore, 
Saturday night. 

Mrs. Evelyn Wilson, of Hyde 
Park spent Sunday with home 
folks. 

Gayle Craddbck of the U. 8. Army 
spent Friday with his wife and 
daughter. 

John Jones and William Reitman 
helped Edgar Graves and sons 
butcher hogs, Thursday. 

Orville Judy spent the holidays 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. 
M. Judy. 



used per 



RIVER VIEW 



Those on the sick list with colds, 
are Mrs. Henry Black, Mrs. James 
Wilson and several others. We wish 
for them a speedy recovery. 

We extend deepest sympathy to 
.the family of Tom Ross who pass- 
ed away one day last week. 

Mrs. Margie Hodges, of Rising 
Sun, spent a few days here with 
her relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Bob 
Hodges. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Ray Smith, 
Saturday. 

W. B. Stephens spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Clore 
on Lick Creek. 

The Hamilton school reopened 
again Monday, after being closed 
for one additional week due to the 
icy condition of the roads. 

E. L. Stephens, of Covington was 
the guest of his son, C. L. Step- 
hens and family one day last week. 



, , — -^- 

county were increased si 
percent when 200 pound* 
monism nitrate were 
acre. 

Kentucky 103 yellow and Ky. 72 
white hybrid corn ware sated first 
in quality, yield and sailing value 
on demonstration plots In Hick- 
man county. 

County Agent 8. W. Anderson of 
Jefferson county estimates that 90 
percent of the cultivated land in 
the county is protected by cover 
crops. 

The average yield of cotton In 
Fulton county 1« reported to be 
higher than last year, some yields 
being two bales to the acre. 




BONA 

We 
of 
J. 

to break his 

tore three ribs when a 

stalled on the ley 

Joe Rouse and 
ed from the 
his boos* which he 
chased from Mel vin Wasson. 

Mrs. Mattie Wbiteon am 
Alice Chapman are 
their home with flu. 



to 



Try A Want Ad —They Sell 






VISIT 



FARM AND HOME 

In Pike county 675 packages of 
seeds for fall gardens were distri- 
buted to 4-H Club members. 

Approximately 10,000 acres or 40 
percent of tilled land in Livings- 
ton county were seeded to cover 
crops this fall. 

Fifteen orchards of apples, 
cherries, plums, peaches and pears 
were set out in Nicholas county in 
November. 

Heavy yields of corn have been 
reported by a large number of 
farmers in Trigg county, many 
yields approaching 100 bushels to 
the acre. 

It is estimated that homemakers 
in Jefferson county will make more 
than 100 dressforms for use in 
their home sewing. 

Yields of hybrid corn in Leslie 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



Mrs. Woodruff and granddaugh- 
ter Mildred of Tennessee are house 
guests of Bro. and Mrs. L. M. Ham- 
ilton and family. 

John WhltaKer moved from the 
Beall farm to Bullittsvllle New 
Year's Day. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter Jean spent Monday even- 
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 
Wilson and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour and 
daughter entertained Mr. and Mrs. 



- 



GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Plumbing - Heating - Electrical 

Florescent Bed Lamps, Ivory metal . . . „\ $ 6.95 

25' Rubber Trouble Lamp, complete 2.95 

9' Extension Cords, approved , . . .49 

Electric Iron Elements, fits 'all 1.00 

Pipe Wrenches, 6" to 24", from 98 

Medicine Cabinets, steel , 3.95 

Blow Torch, quality 1 quart 5.45 

Electric Water Pumps, all types 78.95 

Gas Ranges, Oil Stoves, Laundry Stoves 5.95 

Towel Racks, White Steel ....:... • .35 

Laundry ,Tray« r Twin Steel Reinforced 10.45 

Toilet Tank and Bowl, Brass Fitting ......". 19.95 

Nite Latch, Padlocks 59 

W-' «»»»♦ W**-». RnillM- 1AOK 

Cabinet Sink, complete 59.95 

Electric Water Heater, automatic '. . . 89.95 

Iron Cords, Approved 6' V 79 

Large White Stew Pots 1.39 

PIPE - VALVES - FITTING - R. E. A. WIRING 

LITE FIXTURES 

WINKLER STOKERS ON DISPLAY 

Bluegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) 
121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5726 



VALENTINE 
DAY 



THE TIME— 

a. . 

February 14, St. Valentine's 
Day, when most folks are 
just a bit sentimental, and 
send mementos of edifferent 
kinds. 

THE GIRL— 

Any lady from 6 to 60 who 
likes to be beautiful in body 
and soul and— somebody's 
valentine. 

and THE PLACE— 

STEVENS STUDIOS, where 
good portraits and photo- 
graphs are made. When you 
see the big valentine in our 
window, you will agree that a 
good photograph is what you 
want to send. 



No appointment needed. 
Open Saturdays to 9:00 
—Monday thru Friday to 
6:00 in the evening. 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 



DIXIE DRY GOODS 

SAVE ON OUR 

JANUARY CLEARANCE 

SALE 

HERE ARE A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS 

ONE LOT OF MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS $ fl .39 

All colors and sizes. $1.98 value for * 

MEN'S WORK SOX 15c 

CHILDREN'S PRINT DRESSES CA|» 

Sizes 1 to 3 — 3 to 6... *#W 

LADIES' COTTON HOSE 25c 

LADIES' BEDROOM SLIPPERS 89c 

LADIES' RAYON HOSE 36c 

81x90 SHEETS special $1.79 

4(MNCH MUSLIN :. 19c 

12-FOOT AAA BLUEGRASS TOBACCO $Q.OO 

CANVAS ..; « ....per 100 yds. W, 

BUILT-UP SHOULDER SLIPS T5c 

Reg. size 65c extra size *'**• 

LADIES' COTTON PRINT DRESSES 1.69 - 1.98 

DIXIE DRY GOODS CO., INC. 

On The Highway - ERLANGER 



GEO. C. GOODE 

- ■ . 

Has New Shipment Of 

MORTON'S SUGAR fcURE 
MORTON'S TENDER QUICK 
MORTON'S MEAT PUMP 

CRACKED and FLAKE HOMINY 
GENUINE NEW ORLEANS MOLASSES 
LARGE MACKEREL 

NEW LAKE HERRING 



GEO. C. GOODE 

31 PIKE ST. - 28 W. 7TH COVINGTON, KY. 



4511 



>•••< 



If you are interested in having a Locker Plant for Burlington and surrounding ter- 
ritory, clip the agreement below, fill out properly, and attach your check, and mail 
to the County Agenf s office or The Boone County Recorder, Burlington. 

AGREEMENT 

• * — ^ 

Burlington Locker Plant 






?> 
* 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



I request that you reserve for me in your Frozen Pood Locker Storage Plant at the above Address one 
door type locker at $12.50 per year each or one drawer itype locker at $16.00 per year each. 

In consideration of the reservation of this locker forme, I hereby rent said locker for a period of one 

year commencing on the day my locker is available for usf; 

My remittance of $ is enclosed herewith, and I also agree to deposit TSc per key for not 

exceeding two keys per locker when the same are available, and abide by plant regulations. The key deposit 
will be refunded to me when I surrender the locker and keys. 

1 I understand that my money will be returned to me in full by the Bank in the event that the Federal 
government does not grant the necessary priorities to permit the construction ol this locker plana, or if. 
for any other reason, the same is not constructed. 

I hereby certify that*I oualify as a producer ol foods as defined by the War Production Board. 



Accepted : 



Name 



Date. 



1945 



R. F. D. or St 



* 



Town 



. Make Remittance Payable To 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

. BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



J 



_ 



TBT7KSDAT, JANUARY 11. lttt 



■ t- . 

THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OP JANUARY 15, 1925 



Limabnrg 
jmag Betty Deans spent the past 
week with her sister, Mrs. J. P. 
..Brothers. . ., 1 -- - ■ *- — 



Mr. and Mrs. Will Gross called on 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick last Sun- 
day evening. 

Miss Rachel Utz spent Saturday 
with her grandmother, Mrs. Sarah 
Brown. 

Gunpowder 

R. E. Tanner Is the first In this 
neighborhood to finish plowing. 

Thomas Easton moved to one of 
E. H. Blankenbeker's farms a few 
days since, known as the 
Carpenter farm. 



Erlanger 

Miss Etheleen Burrpws and 
Walter Whitson, of Walton, called 
on Mr. and Mrs. John R. Whitson, 

Saturday afternoon; — — '■ — 




Lyman Rice and wife entertain- 
ed at dinner Sunday, Rei*en Con- 
ner and Mrs. Rachel Denady. 

Mrs. John R. Whitson and Mrs. 
Joe Meyers dined with Mrs. Rufus 
Tanner, Sunday. 

Burlington 

Miss Helen Crisler, of Ludlow, 
was visiting Mrs. Ida Balsly, last 
week-end. 

Deputy Sheriff, Thos. Percival, 
Caleb of Walton, was in Burlington Mon- 
!day, on official business. 

Rev. W. W. Adams spent Sunday 
with Dr. and Mrs. E. W. Duncan. 
Petersburg 

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Keim had as 
their guests Sunday, Rev. Paul 
Gillespie, of Burlington, Rev. Clark 
and Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Arnold. 

Mr. Hubert Walton and family 
and Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Watts were 
shopping in Cincinnati, Thursday. 
Nonpariel Park 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Gray (nee 
Lucille Stephens) are rejoicing 
over the arrival of a fine baby girl 






WANTED! 



All kinds of Band Instru- 
ments — Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxaphones; 
etc. 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 



540 Madison 



HE. 7413 




JAMESWAY 

HOG FEEDERS 

JAMESWAY '. 

Electric Brooders 

SPECIAL! 

Oakes Oil Burning 
Brooder 

350 to 400 $4j Q.95 

Chick Size JL «7 

537-539 Pike St. Covington 

ZIMMER 

HARDWARE CO. 

HEmlock 4741 



at their home in Ludlow. 

Ed Clarkson, wife and son Rob- 
ert, spent Thursday in Covington 
with his sister, Mrs. Ed Rouse. 

Miss Lizzie Dorsey spent several 
days the past week with Misses 
Tina and Addle Norman, of Cov- 
ington. • ■„ * *" 
Pleasant Ridge ' . 

Ray Williamson and family vis- 
ited James West and family, Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Harriet Fritz and daughter, 
Marjorie are visiting Mrs. Lou Van 
Ness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Smith and 
daughter Myrtle, visfted Mrs. 
Charity Louden, Sunday. 
Pt. Pleasant 

Miss Elizabeth McGlasson, of 
near Taylorsport, spent the week- 
end with Miss Sarah E. Tanner. 

Miss Mildred Schwartz spent last 
Saturday afternoon with Mrs. 
Charles Darby. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Heist re- 
turned home after a six week's 
visit with their daughter, Mrs. 
Clyde Barlow, of Ravenna, Ky. 
Constance 

Mrs. Luther Hood was the guest 
of Mrs. Frank Hood and Mrs. 
Keene Souther, last Tuesday. 

Mrs. John Klasserner entertain- 
ed her children .and grandchil- 
dren with, a Christmas dinner in 
honor of her son Harry. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kottmyer 
and son and Mrs. Carrie Riggs 
spent New Year's evening in Cov- 
ington. 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 






FREE CHECKING 



R. Michels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St. Covington, Ky. 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF EMILY MORRIS, DECEASED 

The Executor of the estate of 
Emily Morris, deceased, has filed 
his settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any person having 
exceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before February 
5, 1945, (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF WALTER SOWDER, DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of Walter Sowder, deceased, has 
filed her settlement in the Boone 
County Court and any person hav 
ing exceptions to file to the settle- 
ment must do so on or before Feb- 
ruary 5, 1945 (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF C. S FELDHATJS, DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of C. S. Feldhaus, deceased, has 
filed her settlement in the Boone 
County Court and any person hav- 
ing exceptions to file to the settle 
ment must do so on or before Feb 
ruary 5, 1945 (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
• Boone County Court 






iiiiiniiiiiiiimniiiiimiiiiiiiniiinniiiiiiii 

WITH OUR BOYS 
IN SERVICE 

iiiiiiiimiiiitiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiHimiiiiiiiiwiii 

We are in receipt of the follow- 
ing letter from Lt. Lorraine Relm- 
er: 

"I sincerely wish to, thank you 
for sending me The Recorder these 
past two years that I have been in 
the army— and would appreciate it 
much if you would continue to send 
it tfl'me at this address: 2nd Lt. 
Lorraine Reimer ANC, N-767223, 
241st General Hosp. APO 652, care 
Postmaster, New York, N. Y." 

"Lt. Reimer writes that she would 
appreciate hearing from friends at 
home, and will try to answer every 
letter received. She sends greet- 
ings to all the folks back home. 
• ♦ • 

The following letter, written by 
George Louden, somewhere in the 
Phillipines, was received by his sis- 
ter, Mrs. F. H. Webster, of Flor- 
ence, Ky.: 

"I will try and drop you a few 
lines this evening as I am thinking 
of you. How is everyone out there? 
As for myself I am O. K. 

"Things sure have been happen- 
ing here in the last five weeks. 
When we came over here we were 
attacked eight times in one aft- 
ernoon by Zeros. Boy, I thought 
every minute they would get us, 
but we got by alright. It was sure 
exciting for a while. I saw Jim 
and the boys here one day last 
week, so they are alright. They 
shot down three of the planes that 
were after us. 

"Well, Sis, I had a very nice 
Thanksgiving dinner, had turkey 
and almost everything that goes 
with it, even though the Japs were 
hot after us. 

"How are the folks down home? 
I haven't heard from them for 
quite a while — in fact I haven't 
had any mail from anyone until 
yesterday. I had two letters, one 
of them from Jane. How is Bud 
and Anna Mae? 

"I sure would like to be there 
with you for Xmas dinner. I just 
know what kind of a dinner you 
will have, but I guess thaf is im- 
possible, but maybe next Xmas. 

"We have the natives do our 
washing and they sure do it nice, 
and they don't charge us very 
much. I can get twelve large 
pieces done for fifty cents, and 
that is better than I can do it my- 
self. 

"They brought us some cake, and 
it was delicious. They roll it in 
banana leaves and bake it under 
the ground. 

"All the young , natives speak 
good English and/are well educat 
ed. They have good manners but 
are very poor. They were robbed 
of all their clothing, so they go 
around begging for clothes to wear. 
They are to be, pi tied, and they all 



seem to be kind and honest.. 

"Well Sis, I can't think of any 
thing else to say Just now, so will 
say goodbye and be sure and an- 
swer real soon, for that is all we 
have to look forward to Is our let- 
ters from home. Will close, and 
goodbye to all." 

Word was recently received by 
relatives that Flight Officer Ivan 
K. Norris is now located overseas. 
His latest address is: F-Q Ivan K. 
Norris T132986, 458th Bomber 
Group, 754th Sqdn., APO 558, care 

Postmaster, New York, N. Y. 

■ * • • 

Pvt. Russell G. Groger, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gilbert Groger, of Wal- 
-ton, has returned to Camp Bland- 
ing, Fla., after spending a brief 
furlough at home. He entered the 
armed forces in July 1944, complet- 
ing his basic training in Novem- 
ber. 

He is a graduate of the Walton- 
Verona High School. 





BOTH 
NEED 
GOOD 
IEYE/IGHT 



Clear, comfortable vision 
is truly a material aid to 
education . . . faulty eye- 
sight seriously retarda /ft 



RED CROSS OPERATIONS 

WILL REACH PEAK IN 1945 

Washington, D.. C— "American 
Red Cross operations at home and 
abroad will reach their war-time 
peak in 1945," Mr. Basil O'Connor, 
Chairman of the American Red 
Cross War Fund to be raised in 
March 1945 had been fixed at 
$180,000,000. ' 

The Central Committee set the 
goal following careful review of 
budget estimates for American Red 
Cross work in the United States 
and overseas for the year begin- 
ning March 1, 1945, Mr. O'Connor 
said. He added that Colby M. 
Chester, chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of General Foods 
Corporation, will be chairman of 
the 1945 campaign. 

"Our new budgets," Mr. O'Con- 
nor said, "represent an appreci- 
able increase in the services we 
will render in Europe, in the Pac- 
ific, and at home, but we have 
been able to keep the total 1945 
goal slightly under the one for 
1944 because of oversubscription of 
our earlier campaign and certain 
economies in this- year's operations 

"After personally inspecting our 
operations in England and on the 
continent, and after conferring 
with Generals Eisenhwer, Bradley, 
Patton and Clark, I forsee an in- 
crease rather than a decrease in 
the need for 1 American Red Cross 
services on the continent and after 
the European fighting is over. Like- 
wise it is obvious the American 
Red Cross must expand its Pacific 
and Far Eastern operations during 
the coming year. 

"It is our intention that Red 
Cross stay with our troops until all 
of them are returned home and 
continue to serve them through 
their adjustment back to civilian 
life. For this reason we must ask 
the American public to consider 
our goal of $180,000,000 as an ab- 
solute minimum." 



BIG FOOD SUPPLIES 

STORED IN MADISON 
A survey, made by Home Agent 
Sara T. Campbell showed that 
Madison county women had, 595, 1 er crops 
580 quarts of vegetables, fruits and 
meats canned for winter use. Mad- 
ison county farm families also had 
12,096 pounds of meat, 7,000 pounds 
of vegetables and 8,580 pounds of 
fruits in a frozen food locker. Also, 
27,000 pounds of fruits and vege- 
tables were dried and about 250,- 
000 pounds of potatoes, apples and 
other food products stored. Ap- 
proximately 558,196 pounds of meat 
were cured In the county. 



Hundreds of gardens in Harlan 
county were covered with green 
fall crops which supplied food at 
the same time they provided oov- 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF HATTIE BERKSHIRE, 
DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of Hattle Berkshire, deceased, has 
filed her settlement in the Boone 
County Court and any person hav- 
ing exceptions to file to the settle- 
ment must do stf on or before Feb- 
ruary 5, 1945 (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



• Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF OMER ATHA, DECEASED 

The Executrix of the estate of 
Omer Atha, deceased, has filed her 
settlement in the Boone County 
Court and any person having ex- 
ceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before February 
5, 1945 (next regular 5 term of Counr 
ty Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



BULLITTSVILLE HOMEMAKERS 

The Bulllttsville Homemakers 
will hold their monthly meeting 
January 18 at the home of Mrs. 
Burnam Roberts. All members are 
urged to be present and asked to 
bring their neighbor. 

Mrs. M. M. Lucas. 



DR. A. W. HOPPER 



CHIROPRATIC PHYSICIAN 

ADAMS BUILDING 

433 Madison Avenue 

Covington, Ky. 



Hoars: 10-12 A. M., 2-5, 7-8 P. M. 
EXCEPT THURSDAYS AND SUN- 
DAYS. 

COlonial 9544 






Baby 
Chicks 

POULTRY EQUIPMENT 

POULTRY - DAIRY - 

HOG FEED 

DR. SALSBURY REMEDIES 

Figaro Meat Curing Products 

HUGO TUNG 

Ful-O-Pep and Dr. Heinz 
Feeds 




512 Pike St.. Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 9168 
OPEN TILL 7 P.M. DAILY 



BEAVER LICK 

(Delayed) 



FARMERS ! 

Stop in and get our spring prices on: 

GRASS SEEDS - FERTILIZER - UBIKO FEEDS 

ELECTRICAL WIRING 

FLORENCE FEED AND ELEGTRIC 

STORE 

RAYMOND GROSS, Prop. 



T-H e ; a»j'e we LCRS< 



hStt-iSjM 






SINCC.1BS7 



«V,^eVtH6T0»H 



And keeps "The rimes" ahead kf PJM. density readership 



ALBERT Y. ARONSON . . The Louisville Times' Managing Editpr, is 
one of America's most vigorous newspaper personalities. Hand on the 
throttle, his faithful crew of fifty aboard, Al makes the dally run of five 
editions on a miraculous schedule of split-second timing. 

Handling hundreds of columns of history-making news has been 
Aronson's job during his 25 years as newsroom boss. His staff quickly 
came to. respect the big man's desire for crisp completeness in the 
news, his fierce contempt for slip-shod work. As each edition goes to 
press, a system of lights flashes in the ceiling of The Times room. His 
colleagues will tell you that the energy for this electric system emanates 

Bom in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, educated in Indiana, Al began his news- 
paper career in Detroit before joining us in 1907. Thinking of himself 
as an "operational" editor, processing and condensing news for easy, 
informative reading, Aronson has intimate knowledge of every side of 
the newspaper business. -His advice to budding journalists is basic 
training on country newspapers before trying the big city dailies. 

World Happenings of the Day Ready to Read Every Evening In 



Louisville Times 



JUST RELEASED! 

'3 



HEAVY CAST ALUMINUM 
2-qt. Sauce Pan 



10' /. -INCH FRYING 
PAN 



95 



75 



7-PC. CUTLERY SET 

Stainless steel; 7 different $«J 
type knives with holder; all & 

PATS CHINA STORE 



95 



Also Location of 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 Madison Cot. HE. 4988 



Born to Mr. and Mrs. Matthew 
Ryan, a fine girl Dec. 27. Dr. Mar- 
shall was the attending physician. 
Mrs. Fanny Howard and Mrs. 
Harry Moore visited Mr. and Mrs. 
J. F. Points, .of Sherman, Monday 
Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd Johnson and 
Sam spent the Christmas holidays 
with their parents, Mr. and Mcs. J. 
C. Cotham, of Clarksville, Tenn. 

Miss Delia Marie Maddin is much 
improved after several weeks' ill- 
ness. 

William Wilson and Hume Cleek 
are enjoying a visit to St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. " : 

Mrs. John Conley is at home, 
after a few weeks stay at the hos- 
pital, and is much improved in 

health 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Green enter- 
tained their immediate family with 
a dinner at their home here on 
Christmas Day. 

Joe Besterman entered Booth 
Hospital last week where he is tak- 
ing treatment. 

Glad to report that Jim Sleet and 
John Friend are both imich im- 
proved - at this time. 

» A house on the farm of Roy 
Kenney and' occupied by his fath- 
er-in-law, Mr. Chandler and fam- 
ily, burned Thursday. They were 
not at home at the time of the 
fire, and when the fire was dis- 
covered it had gained such head- 
way that very little furniture was 
saved. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Clifton 
received word last week that their 
son Pfc. George Clifton, who was 
reported wounded in action about 
a month ago, Is now in a hospital 
in Italy recovering from very ser- 
ious wounds. They also received 
the Purple Heart awarded their 
son. George has many friends 
here who rejoice to hear that he 
is well along the road to recovery. 



GENERAL HAULING 

DAY OR NIGHT 
LIVESTOCK and TOBACCO 

RUSSELL MILLER, JR. 

one Florence 823 Union, Ky., R. 1. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiAiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimmiiiii: 

f PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK * TRUST CO. | 

COVINCiTOrV, KENTUCKY 

1 7AT1 | 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... i 

.ii i iiiiiiiii iiiii iii i iiii iii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit :iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittr^ 






•j 


ALUMINUM PAINT 

Dutch Standard chrom- . 
atic Aluminum Paint . . 


3 


95 

Gal. 


"Red Hot" Aluminum for 


'1 


.75 



GORDON SUPPLY CO, 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



WINS AS SOIL SAVER 

Robert Nelson Morris, Barren 
county 4-H Club boy, won a $50 
war Rntid fnr hiq woiiW in soil con- 
servation, tie testeoA sous on, mo 
father's farm for the need of lime 
and phosphate, sowed cover crops, 
made a map of changes needed in 
fence lines, made a home-made 
level, outlined plans for contour 
cultivator, mowed weeds in pas*p 
tures, and listed livestock and crop^ 
needs of the farm. 



Robert Shaw, manager of the 
Henry Fisher farm in Jefferson 
county, reports that only 15 pigs 
were lost from 15 litters farrowed 
on sloping floors. 



JANUARY 

CLEARANCE- 

SALE! 

. ■• - * 

c 
Entire stock of Men's, Ladies and 

Children's clothing at 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," 
"Poll Parrot fi and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell oet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. . 

MORRIS DEFT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER,**-- -:- KENTUCKY 



» ' ' 



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■■■■ 



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■^■^■■■■■"■■■■■■■•pHBBM 



■HHHHHHHIHH1 




i 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BUBUN OTOM, 



rwoMaDAi, jawuart u. 



mm 



HBJ p# 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHII 

This Week In OPA 

iiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiAiiii 

Shoe Stamp* To Remain Good 

Cancellation of outstanding shoe 
stamps is not being considered, 
the OPA said this week. 

Although Increased military de- 
mands are cutting into civilian 
supplies, the War Production 
Board's Office of Civilian Require- 
ments said that shoe supplies are 
adequate to honor stamps now out- 
standing.— : — - — ~ — 

While the WPB has not yet com- 
pleted its estimate of 1945 produc- 
tion, OPA said indications are that 
the next shoe stamp probably will 
not be validated until some time 
next summer. 

OPA said that no specific date 
for making the next stamp good 
can be given now. That decision 
awaits further information on 
production lor 1045. 

Cucumbers Mark-Up Restored 

The retail mark-up of 2>/ 2 cent;. 
a pound for field grown cucum- 
bers will be restored on January 11, 
1945, the OPA announced this 
week. Its restoration follows re- 
sumption of price control at coun- 
try shipper and wholesale levels. 
Fuel Tanks Prices Set 

Navy fuel tanks of iy 2 gallon 



capacity, which the Navy does not 
need and that are being sold for 
civilian use, have been provided 
with resale celling prices by the 
OPA. k "%Ji 

The ceilings, effective December 
30, 1944, are, per tank: Wholesale, 
new, $1; used, 25 cents; recondi- 
tioned, 65 cents; retail, new, $1.50; 
used, 45 cents; reconditioned, 95 
cents. . 

Pens Must Be Tagged 
Fountain pens and mechanical 
pencils sold at retail on or after 
January 1, 1945, must be tagged 
or Imprinted with the proper dol- 
lar-and-cents retail ceiling price, 
brand name and model number, 
the OPA has announced. 

The tags must show the retail 
ceiling prices fixed in the regula- 
tion or the retail celling prices fix- 
ed upon application by wholesalers 
or retailers to their OPA district 

offices. , 

The OPA said that the tagging 
requirement does not apply to 
fountain pens and mechanical 
pencils with barrel or cap of solid 
precious metal, to used or Import- 
ed articles, or to those imprinted 
for used by advertisers. These will 
continue to be priced under the 
General Maximum Price Regula- 
tion, which sets prices at the in- 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



B.JMETZCER 



OPTOMETRIST - 
631 Mad /son Ave.* 



— OPTICIAN 
, Covington, Ki 



-*rr- 



dlvidual seller's March 1942 level. 
Tire Quotas Reduced 

January tire quotas will be re- 
duced sharply from December in 
some categories, the OPA has an- 
nounced. 

The quota of new passenger car 
tires will be 1,800,000, down 200,000 
from December's quota of two mil- 
lion. A particularly severe cut has 
been made in small truck and bus 
tires. January quota will be 216,- 
000, down 64,000 from the Decem- 
ber quota of 280,000. 

in the heavy truck and bus tire 
group, where a back-log of 100,- 
000 high-priority applications still 
remains unfilled for lack of quota, 
the quota for January will be 110?- 
000, down 10,000 from the Decem- 
ber quota. 

Tractor-implement tire quotas 
remain unchanged at 50,000 size 
7.50 and smaller and 20,000 of sizes 
larger than 7.50. 

Auto Quota Unchanged 

The January quota of new pas- 
senger cars available for rationing 
will be unchanged from that of 
December, OPA has announced. 

For the fifth consecutive month 
— -September through January— 
the national quota will be 3,000 
cars, with a regional and national 
reserve of 600. 

The stockpile of new cars avail- 
able for rationing is now below the 
15,000 level, OPA said. In 1941, the 
last peacetime year, new passeng- 
er cars were sold at an average 
rate of 10,000 per day. 

RATIONING AT A GLANCE 
Processed Foods 

Blue stamps X-5 through Z-5, 
and A-2 through G-2 in War (Ra- 
tion Book Four now good foir 10 
points each. 

Meats and Fats 

Red stamps Q-5 through. X--5 in 
War Ration Book Four now good 



for 10 points each. 
Sugar 

Sugar stamp 34 In Book Four 
now good for five pounds. An- 
other sugar stamp will be validat- 
ed on February 1, 1945. 
Shoes 

Airplane stamps 1, 2 and 3 in 
War Ration Book Three each good 
for one pair of shoes until further 
notice. 

Gasoline 

Stamp A- 14 good for four gal- 
lons through March 21, 1945. B-5, 
B-6, C-5 and C-6 valid until furth- 
er notice. State and license plate 
number must be written on the 
face of each coupon immediate- 
ly upon receipt of bosk. ' 
Fuel Oil 

The unit vallue for each coupon 
in Periods 2 and 3 has been fixed 
at 10 galolns. Period 2 and 3 
coupon sheets became valid De- 
cember 18, 1944 and Period 4 coup- 
on sheet becomes valid February 
15, 1945. Period 1, 2, S, and 4 
coupon sheets for 'consumers ex- 
pire on August 31, 1945. 



RABBIT HASH 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 PHONE 762 
BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed $2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet *: .' 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.10 

32% Dairy Supplement •• 3.25 

Big V Laying Mash ..:.:.... 3.35 

Growing Mash '. •• 3.65 

Broiler Mash '. 3.65 

Turkey Grower ,. , 3.80 

40% Hog Supplement 3.70 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Ration 3.45 

55% Meat Scrap 4.3 > 

41% Soybean Meal 3.05 

Ground Wheat 2.85 

Wheat Middlings 2.75 

Wheat Bran 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal «, 2.85 

Hominy Meal 3.00 

Pdtiltry Scratch 3.20 

24% Brewery Grain 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet ........» ..^... 3.25 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt ,. 1.25 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



iiiimiiiMimiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiHiiimim 

New James 

Theatre 

NEW SHOW TIME 

One Show Each Night at 7:30 CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 2:30 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday & Thurs. 

Charles Starrett, Jeanne Bates, in 

SUNDOWN VALLEY 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 11TH 



Michael O'Shea, Anne Shirley in 

MAN FROM FRISCO 

FRI. & SAT., JANUARY 12 & 13TH 



The river is falling rapidly. 

Olad to reportMrs. Birdie Rect- 
or improved, wteus at the home 
of her daughter, yrs. Jimmie Jar- 
rell and family) »1 Petersburg. 

Dave Lustenberger is on the sick 
list. He is at the! home of his son 
Dave Lustenbergrir, Jr., of Cincin- 
nati. We wjsh for him a speedy 
recovery. 

Mrs. Elmer Jarrell attended ser- 
vices in Belleview, Sunday. 

Johnny Woods and wife of Law- 
renceburg vlsfted their parents, 
Thaddie Ryle and family, Sunday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Margie Hodges was visiting 
Robt. Hodges and family in East 
Bend, Friday and Saturday. 

Orville Hodges is reported to be 
in a hospital overseas. 

Miss Dorothy Delph was the 
week-end guest of Mrs. Thelma 
Hodges and mother of East Bend. 

Robt. Williamson was home on 
leave this week-end. 

Sam Wilson entertained with a. 
card party Saturday morning. 

Joe VanNess and Theodore High- 
tower were shopping in Rising Sun, 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Louise Ryle and son visited 
Mrs. Myra Ryle and mother one 
day last week. 

Robt. Smith was the guest of 
Ray Ashcraft and family a few 
nights last week. 

Mrs. Adah Wilson called on Mrs. 
Anna Ryle, Wednesday afternoon. 

Wm. Delph and wife were in 
Burlington Monday on business. 

Bruce Ryle and family were Sun- 
day guests of J. J. Scott and fam- 
ily. 



Deanna Durbin, Gene Kelly, in 

, CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14TH 



Tom Conway, Mona Maris, in 

FALCON IN 

MEXICO 

MONDAY, JANUARY 15TH 



NO 

TUESDAY, 



SHOW 

JANUARY 16TH 



Joel McCrea, Betty Field, in 

THE GREAT 
MOMENT 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17TH 

.iiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiimn 




BELLEVIEW 



fella Jean Rogers returned home 
last week from Speers Hospital, 
after undergoing an operation 
there several days ago, 
. Mr. and Mrs. Lance Smith are 
rejoicing over the arrival of an 8 
pound hoy born January 1st, named 
Stephen Blake Smith. 

Mrs. Charles Brown and daugh- 
ter were shopping in Covington, 
Thursday. 

Mrs. Lewis Rogers and daughter 
and Charles Shinkie returned 
home Sunday after a two-weeks' 
vacation with relatives in Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ashcraft 
and daughters were Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Win. Kruse and 
family. Others present were Rev. 
Smith, Dud Rouse and Miss Patsy 
Smith. 

Mrs. Lewis Rogers and daughter 
were shopping in Covington, Fri- 
day. 

Mrs. Laura Clore was ill several 
days last week. 

Mrs. Alice Aylor is visiting her 
sister, Mrs. Lute Aylor, of Flor- 
ence. 

Miss Willa M. Deck and brother 
spent Saturday in Erlanger. 

Miss Lucinda Burcham is visit- 
ing her sister, Mrs. Bud Scheben 
of Erlanger. 




the Armed 

at Camp Attertmry, lad. 

for him the best of lack, 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ute called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth, 
Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Wood and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. Rob- 
ert Wood and son Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Bresser and 
family of Ohio called on his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bresser 
and family, Monday. 



Boon e Cou nty Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 

OF FRANK GEISLEX, AND 
' KATHKBUfE GEISLER, 

DECEASED 
The Administrator of the estates 
of Frank Geisler, and Katherine 
Gelsler, deceased, has filed his 
settlement in the Boone County 
Court and any person having ex- 
ceptions to file to the settlements 



I 



«. 



ty Court). 

Clerk, 
pMrt 

B oone County cWt 
nrrTLEMEirr on 



or AM. 

The Administratrix of the 
of A. M. Acts, deceased, has fDed 
her settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any persons having 
exceptions to fife to the s e ttl e m e nt 
must do so on pr before February 
5, 1945 (next regular term of Coun- 
ty Court). 

' • CD. BENSON. Cferk, 
Boone County 



Grayson 



Mrs. W. L. Harrell, of 
county displayed at the 
homemakers' meeting a variety 
20 vegetables, an of which 

grown. 



DEVON 

(Delayed) 

Mr- and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
were Tuesday evening guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood and son 
Charles, who is enjoying a pleas- 
an); furlough with home folks after 
spending several months of active 
duty overseas. 

This neighborhood was saddened 
in the death of Nepolian V. Step- 
hens of Erlanger on December 19. 
We extend our sincere sympathy 
■to his entire family. ' 

Miss Kathern A. Holzworth spent 
the past week with Mrs. Rose Lun- 
kenheimer and ■ son Earl, who is 
enjoying a pleasant furlough with 
home folks before * returning to 
Myrtle Beach, S. C. / 

Mr. and Mrs. Waltsr Noel and 
son Paul, of Gallatin County called 
on their daughter Mrs. West Scott 
and Mrs. Robert Wood on Christ- 
mas. 

Edward Biddle was inducted into 




■ 



WATERLOO 



Mrs. Ernest Brown and Mrs. 
George Rector were Sunday guests 
of Mrs. Melvin Kelly. 

Mrs. Paul Craven and Mrs. Manny 
Goodridge were Sunday guests of 
their relatives here. 

Mrs. Addie Ryle returned to the 
home of her granddaughter, Mrs. 
Jack Purdy, Sunday. 

Willie Presser and Jack Purdy 
butchered hogs, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Eddins and 
family were Thursday night and 
Friday guests of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Willie Presser. 

West Kittle and daughter Millie 
called^ron Mr. and Mrs. Kermit 
Mallicoat, Thursday. 

Mrs. Leila Kite, Mrs. Bess Clore 
and Mrs. Mary Williamson attend- 
ed the Purdy hog killing Friday. 

Willie Presser suffered a badly 
mashed foot from a piece of coal 
one day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lou Williamson 
and daughter were shopping in 
the city one day last week. 

Friends of John Ewbank, of War- 
saw are sorry to hear of his Ill- 
ness. Mr. Ewbank is In a hos- 
pital. 



McVILLE 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Griesser, Cin- 
and Mrs. Lillard Scott, Friday. Vera 
and Mrs. Lillard Scot.t Friday. Vera 
Dean returned home ' with them 
for a visit. 

Seaman Billie Kruse is spending 
his furlough with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Kruse and fam- 
ily. Mrs. Lawrence Siekman, of 
Rising Sun, IncU is also a visitor 

t the Kruse home. 

Miss Rachel Pottinger spent 
Saturday with Mrs. Clarence Wolfe. 

Mrs. Zora Scott spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Carl Griesser, of 
Cincinnati, O. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harley Sprague and 
family, ofr Maysville, spent. the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Batchelor and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Newman had 
as guests this week, Mrs. Newman's 
brothers. 

Guests Sunday of Mr. an<T Mrs. 
William Kruse and family were: 
Rev. Edwin Smith, Cincinnati, O.; 

Mrs. Harry Ashcraft and daughters 
of Belleview. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Galllher and 
Jackie „ot* Melbourne,' Ky., were 
callers of Mr. „ •and' Mrs. Herman 
McClure, Sufluay>- 
• Stewart Ryle; who has been vis- 
iting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rod 
Ryle has returned to a hospital 
in Tennessee. - -^- ' >.- 

Robert WUIiamson, Who is in the 
Navy stationed In New York, spent 
the week-end with ills family. 



4 * : -«. I***" 



LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 



YOUR BEST INVESTMENT 

LET US PROTECT 'YOUR HOME 
with a NEW WEATHERTIGHT ROOF 

First put your money Into War Bonds and Stamps— than 
curs you hava a good, Wsathartfeht roof for ths lasting 
tion if your horns investment. Ws offer a highly skilled 
in roof repairs and re-roofing and p ro t sc t our cus to mer's 
ssts by using CAREY Asphalt Shingles— TOPS in roofing 
Wa handle all details. Mo red taps. Call us today for 
money-saving roof 







•Buy WAR BONDS 
M»f STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 



t!9 CRESCENT AVENUE 



COVINGTON 



Erlanger 



Kentucky 



BREAKFAST 



LUNCHEON 



DINNER 
6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 



AIR CONDITIONED 



*JL# 




STANDARD FOR OVLR 60 YEARS 

OOFING & SHINGLES 



HAVING DECIDED TO QUIT FARMING I WILL SELL TO 
THE HIGHEST BIDDER, AT THE FARM ON RIVER MAD, 
KNOWN AS THE FRANK SCOTT FARM, BETWEEN Mc- 
VILLE AND RABBIT HASH, ON 



Sat., Jan. 

AT 12 O'CLOCK (CWT) 

The following described property: Four good milch cows, 
with 3- week-old calf by side; 2 sets good work harness; collars, 
bridles and check lines; one 2-horse sled; 1 Oliver riding culti- 
vator; 1 Oliver breaking plow; 1 hillside breaking plow; one 3- 
shovel plow; 2 double shovels; 1 disc harrow; 1 hinge harrow; 
1 -horse corn drill; hay forks, blocks and ropes; doubletrees, 
singletrees, log chain; 1 pair stretchers; hoes, pitchforks, shovels 
scoop shovels; 1 large water tank; post digger; wire stretchers; 
crosscut saw; 1-man saw; 2 five-gallon cream cans; one 2 -gallon 
cream can; cream separator; water separator; about 60 shocks 
* fodder; and other articles too numerous to mention. 

TERMS: CASH 



DELPH. Owner 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer. 






■an 



■^^^■^ 



1 " " '■ 



THURSDAY, %ANUAftY 11, 1945 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



STUDY SHOWS GAIN 

IN NUMBER OF OLD 

rSRSONS IN STATE 

There are twice as many people 
SS or more years old for every 
thousand adults under that age in 
Kentucky than there were 70 years 
ago, according to a study reported 
•*? the Kentucky Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. In 1870 there 
were only 76 aged persons for 
1,000 adults 25 to 65 years old, but 
with each passing decade the num- 
ber increased and in 1940 it was 
161 aged persons per 1,000 adults. 
This ratio of elderly people to 
adults has been higher in Ken- 
tucky than in the nation ever 
since about 1900. This trend re- 
flects the steady aging of the pop- 
ulation. 

m Kentucky, adults under 65 
have fewer aged persons to sup- 
port in cities than in rural com- 
munities. In 1940, the number of 
people 65 or more years old per 1,- 
000 adults SB to 66 was 137 in cities 
and it was 168 in farming areas. 
With* children and aged persons 
classified as dependents, it is re- 
ported that adults in Kentucky in 
1940 were supporting nearly twice 
their quota, in terms of national 
average, of people either too young 
or too old to be breadwinners. 

The report states that "An in- 
crease in the proportions of aged 
persons makes for an increased 
burden upon health services; it is 
likely to lead to greater demands 
for relief and pension programs; 
it opens up questions about indus- 
trial policies concerning age limits 
for employment. Kentucky has 
been and is still experiencing such 
an Increase in the proportion of 
aged persons." 



LIVESTOCK -PRODUCTION HIGH 

The year/1944 finds the heaviest 
total production of livestock 
slaughtered for meat purposes that 
this country has ever experienced. 
Tremendous numbers of cattle 
continued to be marketed and 
slaughtered throughout tttf year. 
The first eleven months of 1944 
showed an increase of 13.2 percent 
over the same period a year ago. 
Much the largest number of hogs 
was slaughtered in 1944 of any 
similar period. The previous year, 
1943 produced the heaviest produc- 
tion up to that time but the eleven 



of 12 A percent hogs at the princip- 
al markets in the country more 
than the same period last year. 

The slaughter of veal calves like- 
wise increased materially with 28.4 
percent larger receipts; the slaugh- 
ter of lambs fell off some with 3.8 
percent less than a year ago. Of 
this tremendous volume of live- 
stock, the Cincinnati market has 
handled a larger headage during 
1944 than for many years. The 
Cincinnati Producers, the coopera- 
tive livestock selling agency owned 
by stockmen, operating on the Cin- 
cinnati market has handled the 
largest headage of any year since 
1934. In the combined operations 
of the entire Association, with sell- 
ing agencies at Cincinnati, Dayton 
and Lexington, much the largest 
volume of business was handled in 
1944 of any previous year. This 
headage will total some 700,000 
head. 

The Directors of the Cincinnati 
Producers, at their recent meeting, 
declared a savings or partonage 
dividend of savings on selling costs 
for the years 1943 and 1944 on Cin- 
cinnati operations. Commissions 
collected in 1943 amounted to $137- 
751.55. Commissions for 1944 will 
approximate $154,000.00 A refund 
of savings will approximate $36,- 
000.00. Accounting will be cared 
for and distribution to patrons of 
the Association will be made early 
In February. 

The Twentieth Annual Meeting 
of the Cincinnati Producers willbe 
held at the Netherland Plaza Hotel, 
Cincinnati, Thursday, February 15, 
1945. 



CITY-REARED GIRL 

ENJOYS 4-H CLUBS 



Born in New York and living 
most of her life in large cities, 
Mama Perry, 13, spoke of the an- 
nual meeting at the Oldham Coun- 
ty Honiemakers' Association on the 
joy of being a 4-H Club girl and 
living in the country. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
J. Perry, Oldham county. 

"Living in the country would not 
be complete without 4-H Club 
work," she said. "Club work gives 
you a pattern to live by. It touches' 
all parts of country life and makes 
it more interesting, stimulating 



KENTUCKY FARM, HOME 
CONVENTION TO HEAR 

GOV. THOMAS BAILEY 

Gov. Thomas L. Bailey of Miss- 
issippi has been secured as one of 
the speakers at the annual Farm 
and Home Convention at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Jan. 30-Feb. 
2, it is announced by Dean Thomas 
P. Cooper of the CollRgft nt Agri- 
culture and Home Economics. He 
will address the session for farm- 
ers the morning of Jan. 31, the. 
session for homemakers that aft- 
ernoon, and the conference of the 
Kentucky Rural Church Council 
Feb. 1. 

Other noted speakers scheduled 
to appear on the Farm and Home 
Convention program include H. E. 
Babcock, Ithaca, N. Y., president 
of the Grange League Federation 
Cooperative; Dr. O. B. Jesness, Un- 
iversity of Minnesota economist, 
formerly on the faculty of ihe 
Kentucky College of Agriculture; 
Rabbi Joseph Rausch, Dr. Charles 
W. Welch and the Rev. William T. 
Wat kins, Louisville; Dr. T. O. Hall, 
director of rehabilitation in Ken- 
tucky; Prof. Coleman Griffith and 
Prof. Renato Rosaldo, University 
of Illinois; Morse Salisbury of the 
United Nations Relief and Rehabil- 
itation Administration, and Dr. C. 
Horace Hamilton, University of 
North Carolina sociologist. 

The convention will follow its 
usual pattern of a general session 
for farmers for two days and then 
two days of meetings of farm or- 
ganizations; a separate session for 
women all four days, and the an- 
nual conference of the Kentucky 
Rural Church Council. ,, 



months of 1944 showed an increase and worthwhile." 



» 






SMITH'S GROCERY 

We Deliver— Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, .:• KENTUCKY 



FLOUR, Town Talk 25 lb. bag $1.35 

CORN MEAL 5 lb. bag 25c 

CORN No. 2 can 20 pts. per can 12c 

PEAS, No. 2 can .,20 points per can 15c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can : . * .10 points per can 14c 

PORK & BEANS, Campbells ......... .."T.r.- ...16 oz. can 10c 

MIXED VEGETABLES 16 oz. jar 15c 

PEACHES, All Gold No. 2 V£ can 60 pts. per can 29c 

PEARS, Good Taste, No. ZV% can 60 pts. per can 32c 

APRICOTS, Fame, No. ZVi can 40 pts. per can 31c 

GRAPEFRUIT JUICE No. 2 can 15c 

ORANGE JUICE • • No. 2 can 2Qc 

GRAPEFRUIT, Pink Meat \ 2 for 15c 

ORANGES, 290 size pe* * oz - 40c 

APPLES, Cooking or eating per lb. 10c 

CARROTS S5* , Per bunch 10c 

CABBAGE ........ • • .per lb. 7c 

PEANUTS Per «>• 27c 

ENGLISH WALNUTS .per lb. 40c 

FLAKE HOMINY per lb. 8c 



- v 
1 \ — 



WHEN YOU ARE IN NEED OF 

WATER PUMPS 

SEE YOUR MAYTAG DEALER 

WM. HAGEDQRN 

856 Dixie Highway • ■'■■r.iv 



CHICAGO TRIPS FOR . 

KENTUCKY 4-H'ERS 

Eighteen Kentucky champion 
4-H Club members received trips 
to the National 4-H Club Congress 
and fat stock show in Chicago as 
rewards for their war-food pro- 
duction records. Their names and 
the projects in which they were 
champions follow: 

Ellsworth Allen, Pulaski county, 
meat animal; Clarence Ammer- 
man, Harrison county, Angus cat- 
tle; Barbara Brown, Oldham coun- 
ty, room improvement; James 
Chaney, Warren county, swine pro- 
duction; O. D. Cook, Hickman 
county, farm labor service; Evelyn 
P. Crawford, Caldwell county, dress 
revue; R. D. Floyd, Warren coun- 
ty, food for Victory; Oswald For- 
see, Owen county, sheep; Hudson 
Goins, Letcher county, home lab- 
or service; Bonnie Hahn, Anderson 
county, canning; Margaret May, 
Boyle county, food preparation; 
Ann McWilliams, Oldham county, 
clothing; Lester Meredith, Hart 
county, Victory garden; John L. 
Murphy, Jr., Montgomery county, 
soil conservation; William Palmore 
of Warren county, Hereford cattle; 
Charles P. Prewitt, Montgomery 
county, tobacco; Joan Scott, Hop- 
kins county, girls' record book, and 
Dorothy Taylor, Warren county, 
Shorthorn cattle. 



Erlanger, Ky. 



CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE 

CANNED FOR OVERSEAS 

Twenty quarts of chicken ancU40 
quarts of sausage for overseas 
boxes were a part of the canning 
which Mrs. Ed Jelf of the East 
Lawrenceburg Homemakers' Club 
in Anderson county, did this year. 
When it isn't fruit and vegetables, 
it is meat and poultry she is can- 
ning. She not only puts up food 
for her family of three, but for 
her three daughters, her neigh- 
bors and friends. 

-To be found on her own storage 
shelves this winter are 190 quarts 
of meat, 500 quarts" of soup and 
vegetables, 320 quarts of fruits and 
fruit juices, 220 quarts of tomatoes 
and tomato juic, 55 pints of 
pickles and 36 pints of pimentoes. 
For her preserves and jams, Mrs. 
Jelf uses cane syrup instead of ,j 
sugar. Her vegetables include 

*ans, corn, tomatoes, okra. lima 
beans, bee^, carrots, peas, summer 
squash, sweet potatoes, greens, cu- 
cumbers and peppers. 



LIST YOUR 



FARM OR PROPERTY 

a 

You can take it off my list any time by letter. My commission is 



*%. I advertise, Laell. Fill In blanks below and mall to my address. 

For immediate delivery 



Road or Highway . 

Acres , 

Houses and Rooms 



CLASS FINDS FOOD 

COSTS CAN BE LOW 

Thirty-six and a half cents a day 
will purchase enough food to pro- 
vide a person with all requirements 
for living according to tests made 
by a dietetics class. in the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky College of Agri- 
culture and Home Economics. Act- 
ually, a person can subsist and not 
suffer any dietary deficiency, the 
tests showed, by eating one and a 
half quarts of milk, 20 slices of 
whole wheat or enriched bread, 
one-half ounce of liver and three- 
fourths of a dip of kale daily. 

Should the diet become monot 
onous for a person trying to keep 
strictly within a budget, it may be 
varied by substituting for the liv- 
er three-eighths of a cup of car- 
rots ox for the liver and kale three- 
fourths of a cup of beet greens, 
three-eights of a cup of turnip 
greens, one cup of green pepper, 
one and a half cups of tomatoes, 
two oranges, one-fourth of a 
pound of cabbage or three-eighths 
of a cup of dandelion greens. 

The milk and bread alone, ac- 
cording to the experiment, would 
provide all the necessary require- 
ments except vitmanis A and C. 
However, members of the class 
pointed out, It is vital that these 
two vitamins be included in every 
diet. The foods in which they are 
found are among the least expen- 
sive, they said, so that including 
them in a diet does snot add great- 
ly to its eost. 

Outlining ways that housewives 
can decrease cost of meals, mem- 
bers of the class stated that home- 
makers should buy as cheaply as 
possible, learn to prepare foods so 
there Is little waste, use left-overs, 
make use of seasonal foods, learn 
to buy good brands and grades of 
foods, use all of vegetables which 
are edible, have home vegetable 
gardens and buy food when it is 
cheap and preserve it for months 
when in is more expensive. 

To prepare fods with lithe 
waste, housewives should cook po- 
tatoes in their jackets, cook meats 
at a low temperature, serve vege- 
tables and fruits raw if possible, 
boil potatoes before frying and 
cook vegetables under lids and in 
small amounts of water. 

Left-overs may be utilized, the 
class found, in casserole dishes, 
vegetable soup, meat pies, stews, 
potato and rice cakes, rice pudding 
and Spanish rice, bread pudding, 
dressing, salads, fruit cocktail, 
chili, mush and the usual hash. 

"It is true," the class concluded, 
'that two can live as cheaply as 
one, provided one of the two is 
willing to study fods and dietary 
requirements, to plan meals, to 
buy wisely and to prepare food 
well." 



KENTUCKY 4-H BEEF 

GOES TO WASHINGTON 



MONTGOMERY STEPS UP 

MILK PRODUCTION 

Typical of dairymen in Mont- 
gomery county who are* working to 
keep up production is O.T!. Ramey. 
He made a silo by bricking and 
concreting the pit of an old ice 
house, then^ repaired a 30-year-old 
model ensilage cutter, powering it 
from the wheel of an old truck. 
Farm Agent Floyd McDaniel said 
it made a fine-cut silage as good 
as anybody's. Ramey next took 
scrap iron, two old pulleys, an old 
cable and an old kettle and rigged 
up the elevator to hoist the silage 
when needed. Milk receipts in 
Montgomery county are said to 
have averaged 20,000 pounds more 
per day during October than in 
the same month a year ago. 



The arrival of 60,000 pounds of 
Kentucky 4-H Club beef In the Na- 
tional Capital was the "biggest 
meat news in Washington In 
years,*' according to a full-page 
advertisement in the Washington 
Times-Herald. 

"Seldom, if ever*" the advertise- 
ment declared, "has so much fine 
beef arrived in Washington at one 
time. This shipment is the finest 
4-H Club beef, raised by the farm 
youth of Kentucky." 

A picture extending across the 
full-page advertisement showed a 
long row of carcasses of Kentucky 
4-H calves on the hook. 

Fourteen Washington retail mar- 
kets joined with the wholesaler in 
advertising the Kentucky 4-H Club 
beef, which was bought on the hoof 
at the 23d annual Fat Cattle Show 
and sale at the Bourbon Stock 
Yards In Louisville. 



ONE-HEIFER START 

BRINGS GOOD HERD 



From a registered Angus heifer 
bought 11 years ago, Robert R. 
May of Livingston county has sold 
$1,200 worth of cattle to breeders 
or to market, and now has 21 heif- 
ers and cows on his farm, as well 
as "Grandmaw," the original heif- 
fer. It was in 1933 that Mr. and 
Mrs. May decided to go Into a 
long-time cattle breeding pro- 
gram. Cattle were selling on the 
market for $1.50 to $2.50 per hun- 
dred, and yet Mr. May paid $55 for 
his registered heifer. Since that 
time, reports Farm Agent Robert 
L. Rudolph, Mr. and Mrs. May have 
bought and almost paid for 185 
acres of some of the best land in 
that part of the county. 

FARM WOMEN DO WELL 

ON THEIR OWN MARKET 



Mrs. Otto Tucker of Barren 
county realized more than "$1,125 
from farm products sold at a 
homemaker's market in Glasgow 
during the past year. Total sales 
at the market were $5,058. Mrs. 
Tucker, a member of the Temple 
Hill Homemakers' Club, is also 
managing the cafeteria ..at the 
Temple Hill Consolidated School. 
She attributes her ability to do this 
work to the four years of study and 
preparation of food she had in her 
homemakers' club. 



GRANT FARMERS LIKE 

DIVERSION DITCHES 

Small terraces known as aver- 
sion ditches have stepped up the 
ditching program in Grant county. 
They are a new venture, according 
to farm agent Robert Hume, a pro- 
duct of the resourcefulness of 
farmers in that county. When the 
ditchers available could not take 
care of all the demands^one farm- 
er decided he could use his plow 
and disk and do as well. Other 
farmers did likewise, with the re- 
sult that the ditching program in 
the county has been greatly in- 
creased. 



MOTHER ILL, GIRL 

WINS CHAMPIONSHIP 

Canning 475 containers of food 
for her family of four won for Dor- 
othy Jean Mosely, a member of the 
Sutherland 4H Club in Daviess 
county, the district championship 
in food preservation. As her moth- 
er is an invalid, Dorothy Jean also 
prepares the meals and does the 
housework, in addition to attend- 



ing schoolyCach day. Early this 
C. S. Brookings of Ballard coun- year she 'Worked out a canning 



ty combined 6,000 pounds of ko- 
rean lespedeza seed from 17 acres. 



Monroe county farms this year 
seeded their largest acreage of cov- 
er crops. 



budget for her family, and as a re- 
sult she canned 240 quarts of veg- 
etables, 24 quarts of, meat, 121 
quarts of fruits, 60 containers of 
jams and preserves and 30 con- 
tainers of pickles. 



BOONE CO. FARMS 






FAVOR CONTOUR CULTIVATION 

Thirty-eight Washington county 
farmers cultivated 550 acres of 
corn and tobacco on the contour 
this year. Twenty farmers built 
homemade levels for establishing 
guide rows for themselves and 
their neighbors at a demonstration 
conducted in March by the county 
agent and extension agricultural 
engineer. After the levels were 
built, their use in staking out guide 
rows was demonstrated in the 
field. Farmers favor contour culti- 
vation over straight-row farming 
because it is easier on their teams, 
more moisture is available for 
plant growth, and rains cause less 
erosion. Cover crops were drilled 
on the contour after row crops 
were harvested. 



Prtca ........... 

Amount of Loan 
Federal or Bank 

Post Office 

R.F. D. 

Hams 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our sincere 

ttpplCVltVMUU ouu BistuivuMw MM 

every act of kindness and sym- 
pathy shown to us during the re- 
cent death of our dear husband 
and father, James perry Ryle. 
Mrs. MoUie F. Ryle and Children 



REL C. WAYMAN, REAL ESTATE 

COVINGTON HEmlock 5107, INd. 5064 



as ,100 ACRES — 7- room house, 2 barns, electric. The tobacco crop ss 

this year sold for over $2000.00 $6000.00 ss 

— s 250 ACRES — 2 houses, 2 barns, 11.8 acres tobacco base. Over — 

$11,000.00 worth of tobacco sold in two years and this ■ 

year's crop yet to go $13,000.00 = 

130 ACRES— On Ohio River, 3.2 acres tobacco base, 6-room = 

house, 3-room house, 3 barns, silo, stock, team and ss 

tools, tractor, 'and feed $11,000.00' : 

142 ACRES— Ohio River, all bottom land of best quality; 5- ss 

room house, basement, furnace, bath; 2 large barns, = 

large crib $21,000.00 ; 

■j 324 ACRES— Well located, good bluegrass land, 8-room mod- i 

em home, slate roof, basement, furnace, bath, electric, : 

large stock barn, another barn, 4-room new tenant i 
house, 3-room tenant house. Over a mile frontage- 5 

on blacktop road., View of 10 miles or more over j 

three states. Never ' on the market before in 100 | 

years ;.... $35,000.00 = 

ss 50 ACRES— iy 2 miles from Burlington on blacktop road; barn; = 

no house $3500.00 i 

= 132 ACRES — 1 mile from Burlington, about 20 acres in good : 

ss » . bearing apple orchard. All level tractor land; 5-room : 

house, electric, 2 good barns. Well fenced; 2 ponds, i 

In one family over 100 years $13,000.00 : 

S 131 ACRES— West of Union, 3.6 acres tobacco base; 3-room i 

house, electric, large dairy barn .$6850.00 i 

136 ACRES — 9-room house, 3-room new tenant house, electric, Ss 

2 barns, 21 sheep $9000.00 == 

s= 150% ACRES — West of Union, 5 acres tobacco base: ft-room = 

jjjj; uuuoc, u-iisuiiA bvAAAiAu AAwtAM^., u«UAjr uau *An/aia;o uuiii, £SS 

stanchions for 16 cows; other buildings $8000.00 ss 

ss 174 ACRES — 3 acres tobacco base; not a good location; old " ss 

house; well watered, good land $4500.00 ss 

ss 50 ACRES— Extra good bluegrass land, well located, modern : 

6-room house, basement, furnace, bath, electric. Dairy 2 

barn for 20 cows, another stock barn, running water s 

in both barns pumped from lake; concrete block gar- i 

age. Close to store $12,500.00 ss 



CARD OF THANKS 



Thanks to all who sent Christ- 
mas greetings and my best wishes 
to everyone for a Happy New 

NOEL WALTON, 
Professional Eng. & Co. Surveyor 
Corps of Engineers U. S. Army. 



NOTICE 



Wife Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be In operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are Interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington SO. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Genevra Souther 
deceased are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law and all persons indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle with the undersigned. 
Win. Markesbery. 
28-2t-c Administrator 



FARMS for SALE 

SOLD— You are too late for 2 
farms, M. M. Lucas farm, Bul- 
littsville, 70 acres; L. E. Conrad 
farm, WUllamstown. 83 acres. 

YOU ARE ON TIME for the cheap- 
est Farms in Boone County. 

174 ACRES near Big Bone Church 
old house, no barn; richest and 
the crows fly over. $4500. 

155 ACRES near Burlington; 4- 
room house; 3 barns. Vacant. 
$9,000.00. 

200 ACRE dairy farm, $50 per acre. 
23 ACRES near Airport; bldgs. 
$3700. 

16% ACRES BurUngton pike, fac- 
ing on two roadt* nice level land 
fenced; large lake. $3000.00. 

new 



Call or write for 



list 



REL C. WAYMAN 

Office: 623 Washington St. 

Covington. Phone HE. 5107 

Ind. 5064 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRa at reasonable 
rates. COlonisfmi. 509 Scott 
St tf 



FOR SALE— Three No. 1 milch 
cows, two are fresh. Ezra Conn- 
ley, on Robt. Grant farm, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. 28-2t-p 



FOR BALR^yreah Overnsey cow 
with heifer calf. Mrs. Irene 
Schulte, Tel. Flor. 805. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Hybrid corn, U. S. 13. 
F. J. Hammersmith, Vi mile from 
Florence on U. S. 42. TeL Flor- 
ence 342. 29-2t-c 



FOR SALE— Sow and 8 pigs. Robt. 
Woodward, Erlanger, Ky., u. 
4. - l*2t- 



F O R SALE— Gasoline 'tW*"l 
range; all white; excellent '< 
ditlon. William Points, Cor. Din 
islon St. and Crescent Springs 
Rd., Erlanger, Ky. lt-c 



WANTED— Man to work on 150- 
acre farm; to furnish team, tools 
and four cows;. 3 acres tobacco 
and 7 acres corn. Mrs. Linna 
Moore, U. S. 42, Walton, Ky., R. 2. 

lt-c. 



WARNER'S GOLD EN BURLEY TO- 
BACCO SEED at Oulley and 
Pettit's, Burlington; B. P. Elliott. 

/ Walton; Walter Renaker, Verona 
or by mail. $1.50 per oz, 75c per 
y 2 oz. Clay Bedford, Cynthlana, 
Ky. *9-4t-c 



FOR SALE— Hampshire boar hog, 
weigh about 225 lbs. Walter 
Gaines, Petersburg, Ky., R. 1. lp. 



FOR SALE— Soybean hay. Floyd 
Campbell, between Aurora and 
Lawrenceburg, Lawrenceburg, In- 
diana, R. 1. 29-2-p 



FOR SALE— Electric water pump 
In good condition. $60.00. Call 
Dixie 7208-M. ■ 29-2t-p 



FOR SALE— 1 heating stove, like 
new; for coal or wood. Will 
heat 2 or 3 rooms. Mrs. Geo. O. 
Coleman, Youell Pike near Air- 
port, Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. lt-pd 



FOR SALE— Yellow corn. L. 8.* 
Chambers, Petersburg, Ky, Tel. 
Burl. 436. lt-c 



WILL DO LIGHT SEWDJG— Mrs. 
M. M. Lueas , Bullittsville, Ky. 
Phone Hebron 262. lt-c 



FOR SALE — 3-burner oil stove and 
Hoosier kitchen cabinet. Mrs. 
Orchelle, Dorothy Avenue, Flor- 
ence, Ky. 29-2-c 

FOR SALE— Heatrola. Calvin Cress, 
Burlington, Ky. Tel. 79. 29-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Two purebred O. I. C. 
sows, with pigs; also 1 young 
cow. B. H. Blair, at Cabindale, 
Dixie Highway,. Florence, Ky., R. 
D. 29-2t-p 



WANTED— Tenant to raise 3 to 4 
aires of tobacco, corn and milk 
cows. Will furnish all tools andf 
team or tenant may do same. A 
grand chance. If interested Call 
Walton 1412. 28-2t-c 



WANTED — Farmer, married couple 
must know tobacco; excellent 
working conditions; good pay. 
Millridge Stock Farm, Big Bone 
Road. Waner G. Miller, Jr. 28-tf 

WANTED — Man and wife to work 
on farm in Idlewild section of 
Boone County. All equipment 
furnished. Nice 3-room house. 
Phone E. J. Shannon, JEf ferson 
2646, Cincinnati, or get in touch 
with Tom Clifford now on 
farm. 28-3t-c 



FOR SALE— One 
One 3-year-old 
year-old mare. 



FOR SALE— Five good Shropshire 
ewes and one ram; also pony 
with sled and harness. S. B. 
Faulkner on Conner's road near 
Hebron. Tel. Heb. 175. 28-2t-c 



WANTED TO BUY— Well cured 
-liams at reasonable "price. D. G. 
Fries, 1128 Cleveland Ave., Park 
Hills, Ky. Tel. HE. 7882. 28-2c 



FOR SALE^20 tons of good bright 
wheat,straw, baled; aboqt 10 tons 
first cutting alfalfa. M. C. Fish- 
er, Florence, Ky. Tel. 726. lt-p 



LOST— Black leather glove, boys' 
size 9. Leave at Klrkpatrlck's 
Lunchroom. Harold ..Congleton, 
Burlington, Ky., R. %. lt-p 

J. 



FOR SALE— Two trucks, one 1938 
model and one 1939 model, both 
In good condition, with good 
tires. Robert Eades, Florence, 
Ky. Tel. Flor. 23. 29-2-c 



DAIRY COWS— 25 head of heavy 
producing Wisconsin dairy cows, 
8 Hblstein, 9 Brown Swiss and 8 
Guernseys; also 5 large Brown 
Swiss heifers; all T. B. and Bang 
tested. Illinois horses and mules. 
All stock guaranteed. A week's 
trial given. Easy payments can 
be arranged. Hog feed, $1.85 per 
100 pounds. GENERAL DIS- 
TRIBUTORS, 30 E. Second St., 
Covington, Ky. Open Sunday, ltc 



WANTED— Man to work in sales 
stable who can take care of live- 
stock; also man for farm work. 
Good salary. GENERAL DIS- 
TRIBUTORS, 30 East Second St., 
Covington, Ky. lt-c 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Tom B. Ross, de- 
ceased, are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle with the undersigned. 

John E. Crlsler, ss 
29-2t-c Administrator j^lW 



All of these farms can be financed. 

A. B. RENAKER 



SS TEL. OFFICE 12 



BURLINGTON, KY. 
J. G. SMITH. 83 



RES. 55 El 



TRACTOR DISCS, cultlpackers, to- 
bacco planters, corn planters, 
harness, 3 h. p. gas engine. 

P. O. Morning View, Ky. lt^p 



team of mules; 
mare; 1 nine- 
See H. C. Hand, 



Burlington, Ky., R. 2. 28-2t-p 



FOR WELL DRILLING— Call or 
write Hubert Farris, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Work guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 

FOR SALE— Apples, good small size 
$1.00 per bus. Also larger sizes. 
Wm. H. Moore, Hebron, Ky. Tel. 
Hebron 115. 28-2t-c 



FOR RENT — 150-acre farm near 
Big Bone Baptist Church; 5- acre 
tobacco base. Orin Edwards, 
Union, Ky., R. 1. 27-4t-p 



FOR SALE— 200 tons of good clover 
or timothy or mixed hay. Price 
$35.00 per ton FOB your station; 
alfalfa $42.06. Harry Ball, Fair- 

. field, Iowa. 27-4t-p 



HAULING— Specializing , in live- 
stock. Call Dixie 7698. ask for 
Carl. 23-tf 



INCREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. PuUorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. sired matlngs. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm 
on shares. Tenant to furnish 
work stock and tools. Reference 
required. J. H. Huey, Petersburg, 
Ky. Tel. Burl. 238. 24-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio sarriotaif 
W. ML STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington- colonial 1121. tf. 



f 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road, This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf. 



FOR SALE--Corner cabinet, chest 
of drawers, with matching mirror 
several tables, metal wall cabinet, 
2 rugs, 2 lamps, scales and num- 
erous small articles. John Terlau, 
Burlington, Ky. Tel. 273. lt-p 



BE SAFE— BUT NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

kedkuum auuus 



I 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike St. C»v. Co. 1750 




THE BOONE CoiflNTY 



SEKWEM 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



VOLUME 69 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, January 



EDGAR C. RILEY 
ANSWERS CALL 



BROTHER OF COUNTY ATTOR- 
NEY, CHAS. W. RILEY, PI ES AT 
FRANKFORT HOSPITAL AFTER 
SHORT ILLNESS. 



Edgar C. Riley, 61, died early 
Monday morning at Kings Daugh- 
ters Hospital, Frankfort, following 
an operation performed Wednes- 
day of laat week. He had been in ill 
health for the past several months. 

He was born in North Bend bot- 
toms at what is now the Dr. Crisler 
farm, December 1883. He attended 
school at ttie Sand Hill, Bullittsvllle 
schools and a private school under 
L. N. Early of Petersburg. After 
completing this work, he attended 
Transylvania College, where he re- 
ceived his A. B. degree and later 
received his Master's^ degree from 
the University of Kentucky. 

Mr. Riley had many friends in 
Boone County, having been pastor 
of practically every Christian 
Church in the County. He also 
held the position of Superintend- 
ent of Public Schools In Boone 

County. 

He served as promotional secre- 
tary at Transylvania College, later 
going to Midway Female Orphans' 
School where he served as promo- 
tional director and later appointed 
to the office of president, which 
position he held at the time of his 

death. _ ,„ - 

He married Henrietta Terrill, of 
Petersburg, in 1904, and to this 
union five sons were born. After 
the death of his first wife he was 
later married to Belle Hearn, of 
Frankfort, in 1937. 

He Is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Belle RUey; five sons, Terrill Riley, 
Covington; James Riley, U. S. 
Army; Edgar Carlisle Riley, Jr., of 
Ambrldge, Pa.; Joe Riley, Lexing- 
ton; Louis Riley, Hartford, Conn.; 
three brothers, Chas. W. Riley, of 
Hebron; George L. Riley, of Pasa- 
dena, Calif; Thomas M. Riley, of 
Los Angeles, Calif.; one sister Edna 
M RUey, of Pasadena, Calif., and 
one aunt, Mrs. Delia Crisler, of 
Burlington and six grandchildren. 

Brief services were held at 10:00 
a. m. Wednesday at the Midway 
Orphan School. Further services 
were held at the Midway Christian 
Church at 11:00 a. m., and final 
services at the Bullittsvllle Chris 
tian Church, Boone County at 2:30 
p. m., with burial in the Peters- 
burg Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs, Walton 
funeral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 

Florence Bank Officials 
Named At Meeting Wed. 

> 

C. F. Blankenbeker was re-elect- 
ed president of the Florence De- 
posit Bank at a meeting of the dir- 
ectors and officers of 'the institu- 
tion held Wednesday, of last week. 

Other officers named Include, 
John, Delahunty, vice president; 
Stanley Lucas, secretary; J. B. 
Doane, cashier; Mrs. James Lee 
and Mors. Harry Slater, assistant 
cashiers and M. P. Barlow, Mr. 
Blankenbeker. Mr. Delahunty, W. 
R. Davis, Mr. Lucas and Mr. Doane, 
directors. 



Former Boone Countian 

Answers Call Sunday 

* ■* ~ _— * 

, Wm. C. Parson, known as uncle 
Billy Parson, passed away Sunday 
at the home of his daughter, Mrs. 
Ed Dunnlhoo in , Dayton, Ohio, 
after a brief illness. 

Funeral services were held at 
£he home, Thursday and burial 
was in Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

He was married to Maggie Mc- 
Gulre Cathrell in 1898, and he had 



PLANE CRASH 
PROVES FATAL 



TO GEORGE B. YATES, SON OF 
MR. AND MRS. O. B. YATES OF 
BULLITTSVILLE — ACCIDENT 
OCCURRED IN MISSOURI. 



Hattie Lucas 



Besides Mrs. Dunnlhoo, he is | Yates, was 
survived by another daughter,! crash near 



Mrs. Slouffman; a niece, Mrs. Oscar 
Hodges of Rising Sun, O. V 

He was employed by the govern- 
ment as a guard until he was re- 
tired about 13 years ago. 

He was widely known in Boone 
County and leaves a host of 
friends. 



BANKS AND COUNTY 

OFFICES WILL CLOSE 

FRIDAY. JANUARY 19 



All banks and county offices will 
be closed Friday, January 19th, in 
honor of the birthday of Robert E. 
Lee, it was announced Tuesday. 



APPEAL MADE FOR 
CENSUS TAKERS 



Mo., late 
He ati 
graduatinj 
also was (a 
College 



George B. Yates, Jr., son of Mr. and 
made his home with his daughter j Mrs. G. B. Yates, of Bullittsvllle and 
since her death in 1935. - , husband of Mary Christine Stevens 

"led in an airplane 

a home In Springfield, 

ursday. 

ed Hebron High School 

in the class of '31. He 

raduate of Georgetown 

_ n received his Master's 

degree at the University -of Illinois 

in the class of '37. 

Mr. Yates recently visited Boone 
County in his privately owned 
plane and favored many of his 
friends in the Bullittsvllle neigh- 
borhood with rides. 

He is survived by his wife Mary 
Christine Stevens Yates; his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Yates, and 
one sister Mary Yates. 

The remains were received by 
the Chambers and Grubbs funeral 
home late Saturday. Funeral ser- 
vices were conducted from the 
Bullittsburg Baptist Church Mon- 
day at 1 o'clock witii burial in Bul- 
littsburg Cemetery. 

Chambers and Grubbs were In 
charge of arrangements. ■*■ 



Funeral services were held at 
2:30 p. m. Saturday at the Phillip 
Taliaferro funeral home, Erlanger, 
for Mrs. Hattie Lucas, 75, native 
of Grant County, who died Thurs- 
day at her home on Kentaboo 
Drive, Florence, after a long ill- 
ness. Burial was la Walton Cem- 
etery. 

Mrs. Lucas had been a resident 
of Florence and Erlanger for the 
past thirty yean. She was a mem- 
ber of the Florence Baptist Church. 
She is survived by one niece and 
a nephew. 

The Taliaferro funeral 
Erlanger, was in charge 
rangements. 




EISENHOWER IS 
CONTRIBUTOR 



-m IN FANTILE PARALYSIS DRIVE 
—BOONE COUNTY PRECINCT 
CHAIRMEN ARE NAMED BY 
COUNTY CHAIRMAN. 



1945 FARM CENSUS IS IMPORT-* 
ANT CONTRBJUTION TO THE 
WAR EFFORT TS COLLECTING 
FACTS. 



W. H. Delph Sale To Be 

Held January 20th 



home, 
of ar- 



Mrs. J. R. O'Neal 



ed at the sale 

Col. L 
the salt 



JAMES ROBERT 
KITTLE MISSING 



WAS ABOARD SHIP WHICH WAS 
LOST UN TYPHOON IN SOUTH 
PACIFIC, ACCORDING TO RE- 
PORT. 



Mrs. Ira Jacob Kittle, was in- 
formed Sunday, January 14th that 
her son Jas. Robert Kittle, Mach- 
lnst Mate Third Class, of the U. S 
Navy was missing in action. 

According to telegram received 
by his mother he was aboard a 
fighting ship which was lost in a 
recent typhoon in the Pacific area. 

The telegram follows: 
"Mrs., Ira Jacob Kittle 
Burlington, Ky. 

to inform you your son James Rob- 
ert Kittle, Machinist Mate Third 
Class, U.S. N. R. is missing while 
In the service of his Country, as 
you, undoubtedly know. 

"The ship to which he was at- 
tached was lost In a recent typhoon 
In the Pacific area. s The Navy De- 
partment deeply regrets delay -in 
notification, but casuality list has 
just been- received. When further 
information is received it will be 
forwarded to you promptly. 

Vice-Admiral, Randall Jacobs 
Chief of Naval Personnel" 



An urgent appeal for additional 
enumerators to assist in taking the 
1945 Census of Agriculture in 
Boone County was issued today by 
Ralph D. Adams local supervisor 
for the Bureau of the pensus, De- 
partment of Commerce. A number 
of vacancies for the Census field 
force in this county must be filled 
at once, Mr. Adams said, in order 
tb assure* the ' completion of the 
field work before the end of 
March. 

Applicants for appointment as 
enumerators are urged by Mr. 
Adams to get in touch with him by 
mail or telephone this week at 
Census headquarters for this dis- 
trict which are located at Carroll- 
ton, Kentucky. The telephone 
number of the Census office is 211 
Carrollton. Or if they prefer, those 
interested In assisting in the suc- 
cess of the 1945 farm census may 
leave their names with H. R. Fork- 
ner, County Agricultural agentf, for 
Boone County, whose office is lo- 
cated at Burlington, Ky. 

In support of the appeal for ad- 
ditional enumerators, Mr. Adams 
made public the following state- 
ment issued from Washington by 
Census Director J. C. Capt: 

"The 1945 farm census is an im- 
portant contribution to the war 
effort in that the summing up of 
the facts collected from farmers 
by the Census enumerators will 
provide accurate information on 
the, total all-out effort of Ameri- 
can agriculture toward production 
for. war at its peak. These statis- 
tics are urgenly needed by the War 
Food Administration, by the De- 
partment of Agricutlure and by' 
manufacturers and distributors 
who process and sell agricultural 
products. The information is used 
in planning the further prosecu- 
tion of the war in making prepar- 
ations for reconversion and the 
post-war years. 

"In order that the 1945 farm 
census may produce statistics of 
maximum value the enumeration 
of all farms must be accurate and 
complete. This can only be ac- 
complished by obtaining the ser- 
vices of capable men and women 
in every county throughout the 
United States in sufficient num- 
bers to get the Job done speedily 
and efficiently. For this work, the 
enumerators will be paid at a 
reasonable rate, but Such rates 
cannot be high enough to. com- 
pete with the war industries. The 
Census Bureau does not want to 
hire people away from any acti- 
vity essential to the prosecution 
of the war on the fighting front 
and on the home front. But 
there are many people in every 
countv in this country who are | new year 

vices for a few weeks as enum- 
erators for the farm census will be 
a distinct contribution to the war 
effort." 
To this Mr. Adams added: 
"Unless we obtain a sufficient 
number of enumerators to inter- 
view all the farm operators In 
Boone County, the Information 
needed from this county ; will be 
deficient and the farm facts totals 
for the Unietd States will be in- 
complete. This should not be 
permitted to occur." 



The W. H. Delph sale, which was 
scheduled for Saturday, January 
13th was postponed until January 
20th, due to the icy conditions of 
the roads. The sale will be held 
this Saturday, January 20, at 12 
o'clock (CWT), Mr. Delph stated. 

The sale will be conducted at his 
farm on River Road known as the 
Frank Scott, farm between McVllle 
and Rabbit Hash. Cows, feeds, and 
farming implements will be offer- 

arl of tVio solo ▼ 

dford will conduct 




Mr. and Mrs. Bv^H. Norris, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. R. Forkner and son, 
Judge and Mrs. C. L. Cropper, and 
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Stephens at- 
tended a turkey dinner at the Flor- 
ence Rotary Club, last Wednesday 
evening. 



PLAN COMMUNITY 
MEETINGS FOR JAN. 

f~ L 

TEN AGRICULTURAL IMPROVE- 
MENT PROGRAM PLANNING 
MEETINGS ARE SCHEDULED, 
SAYS COUNTY AGENT. 



Boone County farmers will hold 
ten agricultural improvement pro- 
gram planning meetings during the 
next three weeks, according to H. 
R. Forkner, County Agent. TWO of 
these meetings were held Tuesday 
and Wednesday nights of this 
week, they being at Petersburg 
and Hebron. 

The schedule of the meetings is 
as follows: 

Florence, Town Hall, 8:00 p. m., 
Saturday, January 20th. / 

Walton, basement of bank, 7:30 
p. m., Monday, January 22nd. 

Hamilton, school building, 8:00 
p. m., Tuesday, January 23rd. 

New Haven, school building, 7:00 
p. m., Wednesday, January 24. 
' Veronaybank, 2:00 p. m. ( Thurs- 
day, January 25th. 

Constance, school building, 8:00 
p. m., Thursday, January 25th. 

Grant, school building, 7:30 p. 
m« Friday, January 28th. 

Burungtpn, C6unty Agent's Of- 
fice, TiW, Monday, January 29th. 

Leading farmers have met dur- 
ing the late winter months for the 
past nineteen years to discuss the 
agricultural progress and problems 
of the past season and to outline 
the plan of agricultural Improve- 
ment, they think should be carried 
out in their community during the 



Funeral services for Mrs. J. R. 
O'Neal of Walton, were held at 
the Walton Baptist Church at 2 
p. m. Friday, with Rev. A. K. John- 
son and Rev. B. C, Garrett offici- 
ating. Burial was In the Willaims- 
town Cemetery. 

Mrs. O'Neal, 79, died suddenly 
Wednesday at hex home. Death 
was attributed to a heart attack. 

She is survived by her husband; 
one daughter, Mrs. Thomas Per- 
cival, Walton; one sister, Mrs. C. M. 
Sears, Mobile, Ala., and three 
grandchildren, Capt Layle Baker, 
Ft. Story, Va., and Misses Anna- 
belle and Margaret Percival, Wal- 
ton. 

Chambers and Grubbs, Walton 
funeral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 

Ralph Jones Purchases 

G. C. Kreylich Farm 

On Tuesday of this week Ralph 
Jones sold his farm of 50 acres at 
Llmaburg to M. M. Lucas and pur- 
chased Mrs. G. C. Kreyllch's farm 
of 324 acres on the Burllngton- 
Idlewild Road, then sold' 100 acres 
of his purchase to Earl Sullivan. 
The 100 acres purchased by Mr. 
Sullivan includes the new tenant 
house and the older barns across 
the road, leaving Mr. Jones 224 
acres with the modern 8-room 
home, a large stock barn and a 
3-room tenant house. Mr. Sulli- 
van will continue as tenant on the 
farm of B. C. Gaines for 1945, 
where he has lived for several 
years. 

This farm has been in" Mrs. 
Kreyllch's family for more than a 
century and Is one of the show 
places of the county, being located 
on a high point with more than a 
ten-mile view, over three states. 
This is one of the best farms In 
the county. *> 

The farm sold by Mr. Jones to 
Mr. Lucas was purchased two or 
three years ago from George Grif- 
fith. The house is modern with a 
large dairy barn and another barn, 
with running water in them and 
the land is very fertile. 

Possessions are to be given about 
the middle of February, except 
Mrs. Kreylich and daughter, Miss 
Mattle, have the privilege of oc- 
cupying the larger portion of the 
house until late Spring. These 
sales were handled through A. B. 
Renaker. 



General Dwlght D. Eisenhower 
Supreme Commander of , the Allied 
Expeditionary Force, not only 
found time to endorse the March 
of Dimes, but also to send his per- 
sonal contribution, even before the 
drive opened on January 14th. In 
a letter to Basil O'Connor, Presi- 
dent of The National Foundation 
for Infantile Paralysis, General 
Eisenhower declared: "Needless to 
say I, in company with all other 
Americans, applaud the fight you 
and your organization are making 
against Infantile paralysis. I earn- 
estly hope that your campaign for 
raising funds during the coming 
January will be the most success- 
ful in your history. Enclosed you 
will find a personal donation." 

We are unable at this time to 
give a complete list of all the 
workers in the Infantile Paralysis 
Drive in Boone County, but hope to 
have it ready for next week's edi- 
tion. 

The following names are of the 
chairmen of the various localities: 
Florence, Dr. Thomas Lutes; Wal- 
ton, Mrs. Allen Gaines; Verona, 
Mrs. Will MCCormick; Union, Mrs. 
Ed Grater; Burlington, Mrs. Helen 
Snyder; Petersburg, Mrs. Olevia 
Dolph; Belleview -McVille, Mrs. 
Etna McNeely; Taylorsport, Mrs. 
Earl Morehead; Constance, Mrs. 
Ruth Kottmyer Huey; Big Bone- 
Hamilton and Rabbit Hash, J. C. 
Acree; Bullittsvllle, Mrs. Chas. 
Engle; Beaver-Rlchwood, Mrs. John 
Lewis Fagln; x Hebron, Chester 
Goodrldge. \ 



■ W tthao 



John W. Ewbank, age SI 
passed away Friday morning, Jan- 
uary 12th at his home The Elms In 
Gallatin County near the B*>ne 
County hne,^ • &* 1 * 

He was one of Northern Ken- 
tucky's most prominent e reo d e ri 
of purebred Southdown sheep and 
Jersey cattle. His father, Jacob 
Ewbank brought the first pur ebred 
flock of Southdown sheep to his 
"The Elms" farm in 1864. He Bad 
been a member of Masonic and 
Knight of Pythias fraternities for 
over 55 years, and likewise a mem- 
ber of South Fork Christian 
Church, Boone County. 

He was a merchant for over 40 
years and a postmaster for 18 
years, prior to 1934, when he re- 
tired to manage his farms. 

He is survived by his widow 
Katie R. Ewbank; one son, W. Ryle 
Ewbank, 5 grandchildren and one 
sister, Mrs. Jennie Ambrose, Cor- 
iscana, Texas. 

Funeral services were held at his 
home Sunday, January. 14, with 
burial at Eastview Cemetery, Pa- 
triot, Ind., with arrangements in 
charge of Hamilton funeral ser- 
vice. 



LOCKER-FREEZER 
REPORT DUE SAT. 



Boone County Schools 

Closed Last Week 



SIGN-UP HAS 
RAPIDLY, WITH 
ALS PAID TO 
SIGN-UP TODAY. 



BOONE DAY ROOM 
DEDICATED SAT. 



AT FT. THOMAS AAF CONVALES- 
CENT HOSPITAL— ROOM COM- 
PLETE WITH EXCEPTION OF 
ACCESSORIES 



IK 






j i'- 



Boone County schools were closed 
during the past week, due to the 
icy conditions of the roads, and 
difficulty of transportation. 

Schools reopened Monday with 
very small attendance, due to 
many of the students not receiv- 
ing the announcement which 
was made over station WKRC Sun- 
day night. 



Boone County's Day Room at 
the AAF Convalescent Hospital, Ft 
Thomas, Kentucky, was dedicated 
Saturday afternoon, following the 
meeting of the Camp and Hospital 
Council. , 

Representatives from all the 
other four counties, who are mem- 
bers of this Council, came to see 
and admire the room. Cookies, 
■furnished by Boone County w«- 



All committeemen on the locker 
freezer plant progr am for Burling- 
ton are urged to torn in their sign- 
up report before Saturday, Janu- 
ary 20th, to Pete Stephens, chair- 
man of the sign-up committee, Re- 
corder office, according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. 

The sign-np has 
rapidly with arxty rentals paid In 
to th* committee. One hundred 
and eighty food producers must 
sign-up for one year's rental be- 
fore a wheel can be turned to get 
necessary priorities to secure 
equipment. 

The history of successfully oper- 
ated locker freeaer plants shows 
distinct advantages to both the 
community and to those who sign- 
up at the start. Moat of these 
plants once in Operation, have long 
waiting lists with all lockers rent- 
ed. 

The County Agent and Extension 
Service is interested only in the 
educational features of better food 
uses and in the educational work 
in organization to secure improved 
services. It is highly important 
that our farm people understand 
the opportunities that are avail- 
able. Those who understand the 
locker services and plan to rent a 
locker are urged to do so now so 
that the project may get under 
way as soon as possible. 



. 



rtooen l. low 



men, were served to them, as well home near Waterloo early Satur 



R. A.»S CONDUCT SERVICE 

The Royal Ambassador Gospel 
Team held services at the Madison 
Avenue Baptist Church, of Cov- 
ington. Ky., Wednesday night, Jan- 
uary 17. Sunday night the Gospel 
Team will be in charge of the ser- 
vices at the Cold Springs Baptist 
Church. 



CHARTEi NIGHT >M 
PROGRAM GIVEN 



ANNUAL MEETING 
HELD TUESDAY 



BY FLORENCE ROTARY C LUB— 
ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE 
ATTEND PROGRAM— SEVERAL 
SPEAKERS HEARD. 



A' aimuti 



V.« V w V ..... w - 



ings not only have the advantage 
of reports on new projects tried, 
but through the discussions, re- 
ceive the experiences of fellow 
farmers. All who are interested in 
the agricultural improvement pro- 
gram plans are Invited to attend 
their community meeting. „ 



Mrs. William Jarrell and daugh- 
ter returned home last Wednesday 
after spending a week with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Tucker, 
and son, Ray. 



The Florence Rotary Club held 
their Charter Night program at the 
Florence High School cafeteria, 
Wednesday night with approxim- 
ately l?5 in attendance. 

The banquet Was well planned 
in everv detail, and an interesting 

joyed by those present. Among 
the speakers were District Govern- 
or, Omer Stubbs, of Ludlow; Past 
Governor, R. D. Martin, pf George- 
town College; Past Governor June 
Thompson, of Newport; Judge C. 
L. Cropper, Burlington; R. C. Mc- 
Nay, Erlanger and Rev! R. H. Cart- 
er president of the Florence Club. 
The meeting was* saddened by 
the serious illness of Ben Anten, 
charter member of the organiza- 
tion, who was removed to Booth 
Hospital for treatment. 



OF BOONE COUNTY NATIONAL 
FARM LOAN ASSOCIATION- 
UNUSUAL PROGRESS MADE 
DURING FAST YEAR. 



The annual meeting of the" 
Boone County National Farm Loan 
Association was held in Burlington 
Tuesday of this week. t)n account 
of the icy conditions of the roads 
very few attended this meeting. 
H. R. Forkner made a most inter- 
esting talk on general farm out- 
look and complimented the offic- 
ers of the association for their in- 
terest in keeping this organisation 
functioning for the benefit of the 
farmers of this county. 

Thomas Hensley was re-elected 
director for a three-year term. 
The other hold-over directors are 
E. A. Martin, Karl Rouse, William 
Hill and O. W. Purdy. 

In his report of the years opera- 
tions, Secretary-Treasurer, At B. 
Renaker said farmers In this area 
had made unusual progress in 
spite of rising farm operating costs 
in getting their farm debts in 
shape for the post-war period. Dur- 
ing the year 25 Federal Land Bank 
loans were paid off in the amount 
of $78,400.00 with 23 Commissioner ing 
loans paid in the amount of $48,- 
500.00, making a total of $126,900.00 
loans paid during the year. Only 
two loans were closed during the 



Funeral services for Robert El- 
wood Louden were conducted Mon- 
day at 3 p. m. at the Belleview 
Baptist Church, with burial in the 
Belleview Cemetery. 

Mr. louden passed away in 



year. 

Immediately" following adjourn- 
ment of the stockholders' meeting 
the directors met and organized, 
bv electing E. A. Martin, president; 

and A. B. Renaker, secretary-treas- 
urer. E. A. Martin, Thomas Hen- 
sley and William Hill were named 
members of the Loan Committee, 
with Karl Rouse and 6. W. Purdy 
alternate members of the commit- 
tee. 

The high point in the volume of 
loans was reached December 17, 
1034 when Federal Land Bank and 
Commissioner loans reached $998,- 
600.00. Total loans now in force 
show $566,770.00 which is $431,830.00 
less than the high point in 1934. 

* 



as to the soldiers of building 12, 
who will use the Day Room. 

Pictures were taken, which will 
appear in the dally papers. The 
room which has been furnished 
under the direction of Miss Mary 
Gillaspie is now complete except 
for accessories. More smoking 
stands and urns to use as ash re- 
ceivers are needed. There is also 
need for a few more heavy lamps, 
clean feathers for cushions, play- 
ing cards, games, puzzles, and an 
electric corn popper. 

Following is a list of organiza- 
tions which have already helped 
in this project: Boone County 
U. S. O., Boone County Red Cross, 
Homemakers' Clubs of Hebron, 
Walton, Petersburg, Burlington, 
Constance, Bullittsvllle, New Hav- 
en and Carlton, Burlington High 
School, Petersburg Christian 
Church, 8. S., Burlington P.-T. A., 
Hebron P.-T. A., Burlington Meth- 
odist Missionary Society, Hebron 
Girl Reserve Club, Boone County 
Farm Bureau, and Bullittsburg 
Baptist Missionary Society. 

Other organizations may still 
participate. At present there is 
in the Day Room a framed list of 
the above organizations, showing 
that they have donated" the furn- 
ishings. As other groups of the 
County take part, their names will 
be added. 

At the council meeting nssis of 
other departments of the hos p ital 
were presented, and each County 
was asked to help. Boone County 
pledged itself to f unish five new 
card tables. The other things we 
are to help with need not be new, 
The list follows: 

Small cameras 3% by 4ft inches, 
all kinds of dark room equipment, 
musical instruments of all kinds 
and scrap leather. 

The following list of articles 
need not be In good condition, 
because they are for the soldiers 
to repair as part of their train- 
old electric irons, electric 
motors (y 4 horse, power or less) 
electric fans, motors of other types, 
radios, soldering irons. - 

Anyone haying any of the above 
articles to donate, please call Mis. 
W. M. Townsend, Burlington 55. 



day, following a brief illnc 

He is survived by his father, Mr. 
Jesse Louden; seven brothers, El- 
bert, Wilbur, Jesse, George, Wend- 
ell, all of Boone County and James 
Roy- and Leo in the army overseas; 
three sisters, Mrs. F. H. Webster, 
Florence; Mrs. Albert Stagg, Flor- 
ence and Mrs. Ralph Boh, Burling- 
ton. 

Chambers and Grubbs, Walton 
funeral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 



Farm And Home Convention 
January 30- February 2 

The Annual .Farm and Home 
Convention held at the College of 
Agriculture of the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, will be held 
January 30th through February 2. 
Many Boone County farmers and 
homemakers Club members attend 
this meeting each year. 

Leading authorities on import- 
ant farm and home problems wiil 
address the convention during the 
week. Programs for the conven- 
tion are available at the Count} 
Agent's or Home 
Agent's offices in Burlington. 



fes 



Kcbrcn Homemakers 



ANNUAL MEETING 
SET FOR FEB. 8TH 



OF LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION- 
REFUND CHECKS wnx 
TRIBUTED TO. 
AT MEETING. 



There will be a paper drive spon- 
sored by Hebron Homemakers on 
January 24th and , 25th. Anyone 
having paper please tie In bundles 
and leave at the school on these 
days. Small pieces of paper can 
be packed in boxes. 

Paper is most urgently needed 
and this is one of the ways for the 
people back home to help fight the 
enemy. Don't burn paper, turn It 
in for victory! ^ 



The Cincinnati Producers Live- 
stock Commission Association will 
hold its annual county livestock 
meeting at Burlington Thursday, 
February 8th, at 1:30 p. m. Re- 
fund checks to more than 300 
members will be distributed at this 
time. 

A special livestock marketing ed- 
ucational program will be eon- 
ducted In connection with the 
above meeting. Lives t o ck sales- 
men and G. P. Summers, market- 
ing specialist from the College, will 
discuss marketing problems ami 

The educational meeting is for an 
farmers whether or not they ship 

livestock. 



ENJOYS FURLOUGH 
CpL Robert Darby, son of 
Katie HeiseL of near Lixnebwg , la 
enjoying a thirty-day furlough 
with his mother and other rela- 
tives In ttta county, after 
thirty-five months hi 

CpL Darby has been hi 
vice the past thirty-six months. 96 
of which he be 






^^ 



y, January it. 



= 



THE BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



rv 



&DDHE COUNTY RECIUHIER 



A.E. 

RAYMOND COIBS, Asm. Editor 



at the Port Offlos, Barlmfton, Ky., a» Second Class Mgj Matter 



BEST AD VERTTSINa MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 
AD VERTLS1NO INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 15c per oc^unn Inch. 

ffOTICES AND CARDS or TBANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. 

tfLASSOTKD ADS: 25 words for 28c; ■tj EpaJl 25c; each additional 
word one cent each. AH classified ads. payable In advance. 
MECHANICAL DEFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
column depth, U Inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate , $1,50 p er Year 



AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Years 



RABBIT HASH 



kentucky pres! 
Association, 

ifTzvnn jiHUAtr. !««• 



i 



OEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSEPtMWS 

CALL 

BURLINGTON 95 

We pay 'phone charts 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 



The roads here have been im- 
passible in many places. 

The family of Ray Ashcraft have 
our sympathy in the loss of their 
father which occurred last week, 
near Williamstown. 

We extend sympathy to Jesse 
Louden and family in the loss of 
their son Robert Louden, who pass- 
ed away at his home near Water- 
loo, Saturday morning. 

Wm. Delph's sale was postponed 
until Saturday, January 20th on 
account of the roads being in a 
bad condition. 

Sam Wilson celebrated his birth- 
day. January 6th. We wish for him 
many more birthdays. 

A lot of tobacco has been strip- 
ped this week and ready for mar- 
ket. 

Quite a number of ships have 
passed down the'Ohio River lately. 

.Harry Louden visited his father, 
Jno. Louden, several ' days last 
week. ^ , 

Mrs. Mellie Wingate, Mrs. Maud 
Hodges took dinner Saturday with 
Mrs. Wm. Delph and family. 

We are glad to report Marvin L. 
Kelly is back in the states. He is 
the son of W. D. Kelly, of Walton. 

Word has been received from 
Howard Ryle stationed in New 
Guinea. He writes that on Christ- 
mas Day it was hot and dry there, 
and didn't seem like Christmas. 
Turkey with all the trimming was 
enjoyed by the boys, he writes. He 
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. 
Ryle, of Rising Sun, Ind. He re- 
ceives mail from Martin and Dale 



Williamson and his brother Percy 
Ryle quite often. 

Sorry to hear that Herschel West 
Is In the hospital. He Is a son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Press West. 

Punk Stephens called on B. W. 
Clore and wife, Saturday after- 
noon, i 

We regret to learn of the death 
of Rev. Edgar C Riley, formerly, of 
Petersburg. 

Mrs. Carroll Williamson and two 
daughters were week-end guests of 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 
Williamson and daughter Corinne. 
She returned here with them for a 
visit. 

Miss Dorothy Delph spent the 
Week-end with Harold Hodges. , 

Flave Louden and family were 
Saturday guests of their sister, 
Mrs. Mary Batchelor and husband 
and Brother Sam Roland. 

J. W. Craig called on J. A. Clore 
last Saturday., 

Mrs. Ada Ryle -and two grand- 
children visited her daughter, Mrs. 
Wanetta Woods and husband In 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., a few days the 
past week. 



BEAVER LICK 



Go To Church 



BELLBYUSW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Be*. W. Guth. Paster 

Sunday School 10:80 a. m. 
Morning worship 11:30 a. m. 
Evening worship at 7:Q0 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Everyone Is cordially invited to 
nttend these services. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Root. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services ll a. in. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wamscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. CHlby 
Green Supt. i 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an ' work' with us. 



■ 
- 






QEMEMBERMEN 



—the Chautauqua pitched tent each 
summer? It dispensed education and 
entertainment in easy dose's for both 
young and old at convenient hours 
during the day arid evening. That was 
before the movies captured America. 
Remember? 



Bobby Shields who has just com- 
pleted his "boot" training at Great 
Lakes; has been enjoying a short 
stay here with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Beckham "Shields. 

Joe Besterman, who has been a 
patient at Booth Hospital for the 
past several weeks was brought to 
his home here, Saturday. 

The many friends of Johnny Ew- 
banks were grieved to learn of bis 
death which occurred Friday. Ourflp 
sympathy goes out to his widow, 
son and family in their sorrow. 

J. W. Conley, Omer Kite and 
Harry Moore were business visitors 
in Burlington, Friday. 

Mrs. Margaret Beil and Miss 
Wanda Lee Jones visited William 
Brown and Scottie Jones this week- 
end. 

The New Haven Homemakers' 
Club will meet with Mrs. Jake 
Cleek on Tuesday of 'this week. 



RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH , 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bed inger,. Supt. 

11:00 a. -m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

By HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST, D. D. 

Of Th« Moody Bibte IniUtuU of Chicago. 

BthiMd by Waalarn N«w«paper union. 

Lesson for January 21 

L*MOn subject! and Scripture texts •*- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council oi Religious Education; used by 
permission. 



STANDARDS OF THE KINGDOM 

LESSON TEXT— Matthew 8:3-10. 43-48. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Blessed are they which 
are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for 
theirs la the kingdom of heaven.— Matthew 
8:10. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Claude R. McDonald, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p- m. 

Church school 10 a. m. R. R. 
Witham, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



^ 



GATHERMAN 
FUNERAL HOME 

Tel CO 2580 Ludlow, Ky. 



<«-■ 



POSTED 

All persons are nereoy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. E. Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm of J. W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. 

NOTE— Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGET 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop' 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 up 

Cold Wave 

Permanent SI 0.00 up 

Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



^J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J I ( 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1^ 

! WASHERS REPAIRED I 

iTJTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
AH Size Wringer Rolls For AH Makes 

| WM. HAGEDORN 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger^ Ky. | 

=Ti 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( = 




BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam S. Hoffan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 
Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT).. 

Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 
p. m. (CWT). 

Prayer services each Wednesday 
evening 8:30 (CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. r 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Thursday evening 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially Invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCn 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 

S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 

Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday Scauo; each Sunday at 
10:30 (CWT). Raymond Ashcraft, 
Supt. 

^reaching every iunuay at 11:30 

lfiveninp; Service at 'Hi\, (C.W.T.) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 8:00. 



pilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllH 




SENTUCKjT 




All JmAm breeds U. 8. 



etucki. 



ail WEST FOURTH STREET .LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY 



CHAMBERS & GRUBBS OFFER . . 

£ . - = 

t A service which the older residents of Boone County have = 

B known and respected for almost hail a century— and which 5E 

ss newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. T~ 

— ' **■ '5 

Chambers & Grubbs j 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 382 jb 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifi 




BRING YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 
SGHMirtTJR 

Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 

For Full Price and Honest 
Weight 

Phone: HEmlock 6135 

Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 
Orion Erbaagn, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:80. 
You need your church. 



PETERSB URG M ETHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U. 6:46 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30- p. m. 
Prayer,, meeting each Wednesday 
night at 7:30 p. m. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. * 
Morning Worship at 11:00. 
B, T. U. 6:45 (CWT) for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

x m.rci luL-'JUiifc caw. ,. , . ~„j 

. 7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

10:00 A. M. Sunday .School 

11:00 A. M. Worship. 

7:30 P. M. B. T. U. 

8:00 P. M Evangelistic Service. 

8.00 P. M. Wednesday, Prayer 
and Bible Sturdy. 

Third Monday night, men's meet- 
ing. 



A kingdom must have laws, and 
here we have the laws for Christ's 
kingdom— the kingdom of heaven— 
which He shall one day establish on 
this earth. In the Church we have 
the joy of living as loyal subjects of 
Christ, and hence these standards 
are for our counsel and guidance. 

The verses of this greatest of all 
discourses are addressed to those 
who haye actually taken Christ as 
King of their lives. 'These beati- 
tudes are not a substitute for the 
gospel. They are not laws that the 
unbeliever can keep and thus be 
saved, for this would be uterly im- 
possible. Only he who _knows and 
has called, upon the power and grace 
of God in Christ can qualify to walk 
as a citizen of Christ's kingdom. 

We note two things in this won- 
derful and instructive passage from 
God's Word: 

I. The Character of the Follower 
of Christ (w. 3-10). » 

The eight characteristics of the 
Christian here presented are worthy 
of extended individual attention, but 
we can oiler only brief suggestions. 
"Blessed aje the poor in spirit" 
speaks of humility as a commend- 
able quality. How contradictory the 
present-day philosophy, which calls 
for self-assertion and self-reliance. 
But Jesus was not mistaken. The 
way into the kingdom of heaven is 
not that of assertive self-sufficiency. 

"Blessed are they that mourn." 
The world does not believe that 
statement. It shuns the house of 
mourning. It tries without avail to 
philosophize away the fact of sor- 
row. The Christian, on the other 
hand, feels with his fellow man and 
thus receives a blessing. One can 
really learn from sorrow. 

I walked a mile with Pleasure; 

She chattered all the way. 
But left me none the wiser 

For all she had to say. 

I walked a mile with Sorrow, 
And ne'er a word said she: 

But, oh, the things I learned from her 
When Sorrow walked with me. 

"Blessed are the meek." Poverty 
of spirit comes when a man rightly 
sees himself, and has a sympathetic 
touch with sorrow. Then he "in- 
herits the earth," because he tru- 
ly comes to enjoy it as a place of 
service and Christian growth, and 
not because he has a deed to a sin- 
gle foot of its soil. 

"It is the hunger and thirst for 
righteousness (v. 6), and not the 
possession of it, that is blessed" 
(Plummer). Self - satisfied people 
know nothing of the glory of having 
their hunger and thirst satisfied by 
God. 

We have here also the Christian's 
spirit of mercy which invites divine 
mercy; a purity of heart, cleanness 
of mind, and sincerity of purpose, 
which enable a man really to see 
God even in this impure world; that 
Christlike spirit which makes him a 
peacemaker in a fighting world— 
•yes, that spirit which makes him 
like the Master in sweetly bearing 
unjustified persecution. These in- 
deed are the marks of the man who 
follows Christ as King. 
' II. The Conduct of the Follower of 
Christ (w. 43-48). 

There can possibly be no more se- 
vere test of a man's Christian char- 
acter than the manner in which he 
treats his enemies. Many who pass 
the other tests meet failure <at least 
in part) at this point. 

It is no easy thing to love your 
enemies, but it is the standard of 
Christ, and He will enable us to live 
up to it. Now is a good time to 
put it into practice, not only per- 
sonally, but nationally. 

There can be no doubt that love 
for the brethren will be a more inti- 
mate and satisfying experience be- 
cause they return our affection (v. 
46). Anyone can do that and enjoy 
it. Enemies often return hatred for 
our love— they persecute us (v. 44). 
But we are still to love them. 

That love must move us to treat 
them kindly and to pray for them'. 
Someone says, "It can't be done." 
Yes, it can by the grace of God in 
Christ, and it is being done. 

We need to exercise care lest we 
fall into the easy habit of speaking 
.with derision or scorn of the un- 
godly — that wicked, dissipated 
neighbor who hangs around taverns 
and other questionable places. Let 
us never condone their sin— mat we 
should hate— but may God help us to 
love them and lead them to Christ. 

This lesson is indicated as being 
a temperance lesson, Tfebe^applica- 
tion can only be made Indirectly, 
but it may have value. The use of 
alcohol is so destructive of every- 
thing that is good, that it is quite 
obvious it is not in accord with 



heaven. It is time some church peo- 
ple decided whether they want to be- 
long to the world or .belong, to 
Christ. If the latter is their pur- 
pose, we believe the only consistent 
position to take is that of abstinence 
from alcoholic liquors. . 



til LLITTSVILLE CHRISTIAN 

CHURfE 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at li a. m. and 8:00 p. m: 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 
ISSUE OF JANUARY 18, 1805 



Hathaway 

Born, on the 0th to Claud Ryle 
and wife, a son. 

J. C. White and family spent 
last Monday with C. B. Mason and 
family and Monday night at G. L. 
Smith's. 

Waterloo ,♦_. • 

William Clore and wife and two 
daughters spent Sunday with Plum 
Gulley and family. 

Lewis Merrick and wife, of near 
here, spent Sunday with his sister 
Bertha of Rabbit Hash, who is very 
low with pneumonia. 
Buffalo 

J. L. Huey and nephew, Jimmie 
Huey left last Wednesday for the 
sunny South. * } 

John Moore went to the hospital 
last Tuesday and was operated on 
lajst Friday. 

Plattsburg 

Owen Beemon has bought W. 
H. Sebree's farm for $800 cash. l 

Our people were sorry to hear of 
the death of Mrs. James Rogers. 
Flickertown 

Miss Anna Robinson, of. Rising 
Sun, was visiting her sister, Mrs-. 
Andy Passons, Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

John Deck has sold his Ozier wil- 
lows to the Maurer firm at Belle- 
view, to make baskets. 
Walton 

Honor Roll: 1st grade, Marie 
Menifee, Beulah James, Mary Rog- 
ers, Vallie Craddock, Blanche 
Jones, Etta Carroll. Senior year, 
Nannie Chambers, Hattie Taylor, 
Chadles Jones. 

Hebron 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Tanner, of 
Limaburg, were guests of Mr. T. 
Haf er and family, JSunday. ■ 

Mrs. Robert Bradford entertain- 
ed Mr. and Mrs. Allie Corn, of Bul- 
littsville, last Tuesday. 
Belleview 

Mrs. Fannie Snyder and daugh- 
ter, of Petersburg, are staying with 
Mrs. Mary Corbin, who does not 
improve. 

Forest Rice was hauling goods 
from Erlanger for E. E. Kelly, one 
day last week. , 

Constance 

Miss Celia Anderson entertained 

Miss Olga Haun, one day last week. 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. 



Wm. Peeno was burled at Hebron 
on Thursday. 

Gunpowder 

Robert Tanner sold a food horse 
to Sam Hicks and R. L. Huey last 
Thursday. 'j> 

Mrs. Mary Carpenter received a 
telegram last Sunday, announcing 
the death of her son. Dr. Eugene 
Rice of Wallace, Ind. 
" Kidville 

Misses Kittle Brown and Nellie 
Maxwell have returned after a 
week's visit with friends in Lud- 
low. 

Commissary 

Bert Berkshire, William and 
Cecil Snelling, Harry Acra, James 
Feeley, and Arthur Delph were 
callers at ,, the Commissary, last 
Tuesday. < 

R. A. Brady and wife have been 
staying with Mr. Lillard during his 
sickness. 

Florence 

Miss Emma Hinton is in Sher- 
man, the guest of her sister, Mrs. 
Dan Points. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Aylor visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Hallot Highhouse, of 
Ludlow, Monday. 

Petersburg 

Cecil Burns sold his crop of 10,- 
000 lbs. of tobacco to, J. W. Berk- 
shire for 10c all around.. 

A. E. Chambers has arrived home 
from Peoria, 111. 

Limaburg 

Bob Brown gave the young people 
a dance last Tuesday night. 

Mrs. Mary E. Crigler is the guest 
of her daughter, Mrs. William 
Houston, of Covington. 



W — 1^7 






V 



effcty 



m 



CONTIGUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER, 



'MEMBER 
^FEDERAL HOME UOA 
-BAJJKSYST 



KENTUCKY 



New temporary location, next door, in former 
Bentler Drug Store building. 

3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



^ 




NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Tarda, 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organisation, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
. best all around market 
'W in the country. We 
* hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES?.:?" £,^ r £ 

the first man yon meet. 




|!!!!i!!!!!!i!mi!i;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiijjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|||i!|((i(!!!{!jjj!!!^ 

| FULL CREDIT | 

* > given on 
I ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



= Phone ERL. 87 



Ambulance Service = 



llllllllllHIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 





that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL AUKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 



J 



_l THARP&STITH 



FUNERAL HOME > 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 



r 









. ' 







THE BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BPBLDtOTON, UWltMJLI 



— 



UNION 



Mr. and Mrs. Els Hopperton's 
small daughter, Linda Louise, Is 111 
at the home of her grandparents, 
the Walter Craddocks. 

Miss Mary Hedges Is visiting 
friends In Burlington. 

There will be communion ser- 
vice at the Presbyterian Church 
Sunday night, January 21st at 7:30 



o'clock. Rev. H. B. Lillard of Lou- 
isville will administer the sacra- 
ment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Surface Barlow and 
sons, Gary and Randy were in 
Burlington, Thursday, for the day 
with Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Rouse. 

William Oreenup and Surface 
Barlow were among the group of 
young men from Boone County to 
report at the Induction center, 



l*X**HXHX*XHXMXnX*XHX*XHXHXHX*XHXHXHX*XHXHX*XHXHXnXH7A 

HEATING STOVES AND STOVE PIPE 

JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY 

DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES 
DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS 
Louden Dairy Barn Stalls-Stanchions | 

Meyers Pumps and Water Systems 

FARM FENCING AND GATES 
NO RATIONING OF FARM MACHINERY 

The Jansen Hardware Co. 



Louisville, Monday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond New- 
man's second son, S *-c Joha.New- 
man, has returned to Cheat Lakes 
Naval Station, after a much enjoy- 
ed furlough with his family and 

friends. 

Pvfc" William Feldhaus, who Is 
here on furlough from Cochran 
Field, Macon, Oa., spent the week- 
end In Louisville with his brother, 
James Feldhaus -and Mrs. Feld- 
haus? 

Miss Nancy Lynn Wilson is 
spending the week in Cincinnati 
with her aunt, Mrs. Sammy Traub- 
erlan. t . 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Rachal of 
Cincinnati, were guests Monday of 
Mrs. Maud N. Rachal, 

Mrs. W. M. Rachal has Just re- 
turned from a pleasant visit with 
relatives In Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. B. Warren Utz, assistant 
cashier at the Union Bank, was 111 
and confined to her home the past 

week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Volney Dickerson 
entertained a group of relatives 
and friends with a delightful" six 
o'clock dinner Wednesday evening. 

HILLTOP 




AYETV 

THEATRE 1 

ERL ANGER, ELSMERE, KY 



FREE PARKING LOT 



TONIGHT — FRIDAY 

JANUARY 18 AND 19TH 




ihback Comedy 
Feature Starts 7:09, 9:21 



PETERSBURG 



CO. 0910 



108-110 PIKE ST. COVINGTON, KY. JJ 



*M*HXMXMXHXKXM«MXH*MXM*H«HXH«H«HXMXM*MXH*M«» 



■OTP ^™ 



PEMMMMlMmM 



DIXIE'S FINEST JEWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

«.HOCEETTco. 



DIXIE HIGHWAY ot Groves 



isfcffitwfaW 



MANAGED-: GEOkOE FLEMING 



Suburban jewelers exclusively 
with modern stores in : 

MT. WASHINGTON • CHEVIOT 
NORWOOD • M ADISONVILLE 




Friends of Wm. Brockman art 
glad to know he U Improving, aftei 
having suffered a paralytic stroke 
several days ago. 

Henry Anderson, enjoyed a fev. 
days' visit with his brother Charles 
of West Virginia, the past week. 

Having been gone nearly three 
years, John Robert Darby, son of 
Mrs. Vester Heisle formerly of Hill 
Top, to the pleasure of his many 
friends is home on a furlough. 

Mr., and Mrs. Truman Lucas en- 
tertained Tuesday evening with an 
oyster supper for Mr. and Mrs. 
Omer Lindsay and family, of La- 
tonla. 

Seaman, Harold Utz has return- 
ed to Great Lakes, after enjoying 
a leave with home folks. 

Due to the Inclement weather of 
December 26th the 50bh wedding 
anniversary party of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charlie Moore, Sr., was cancelled. 
However, many friends and rela- 
tives have called to offer their 
congratulations. 

Bill Ottine left Monday to enter 
training. 

Mrs. Clarence Searp of near 
Bromley spent Sunday with her 
sister, Mrs. Minnie Dolehi and 
brother Wm. Brockman. 

Several of our local ladies at- 
tended the Hebron Homemakers' 
meeting Wednesday at the home 
of Mrs. Katherine Peel. 



SATURDAY 

JANUARY 20TH 
Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 



WILD BILL ELLIOTT 

Tucson 

RRIDERS 



John Welslckle has been quite in 
for the past week. 

Dr. and Mrs. 1. J. Love were call- 
ed to Caruthersville, Ind., to attend 
her mother who had received a Tup 
fracture as the result of a fall. 

The community was saddened 
when the news reached us of the 
sudden death of George Burton 
Yates, Jr. He was a resident here 
for several years. We extend our 
sincere sympathy to the family. 

Dinner guests of Mrs. Stella 
Ganes on Saturday were Mr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ira Ryle, Mr. and Mrs. John Lef- 
ler and Mrs. J. M. Thompson. 

Mrs. L. S. Chambers entertained 
the Homemakers' Club on Thurs- 
day for an all-day meeting. 

The W. M. U. of the Baptist 
Church met on Friday at the home 
of Mrs. J. T. Bradburn. 

Arthur Alloway has been on the 
sick list for several days. 
Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Witham spent 
Thursday afternoon in Lawrence- 
burg with her mother, Mrs. Wm. 
Vogel. 

• G. C. Rector has been unable to 
work for a few weeks, due to a 
foot ailment. 

Rev. Edw. Furglnson closed his 
work here at the local Baptist 
Church last Sunday evening. 

Stanley E. Berkshire spent the 
week-end with his parents, Mr, 
and Mrs. E. P. Berkshire. 

Mrs. Nellie Helms sprained her 
arm in a fall last week. 



: 
: 

: 




DeLAVAL SEPARATORS - MHJOBtS 
» *• PARTS and OIL 

GE0.C. GOODE . 

31 PIKE ST. - 28 W. 7TH COVINGTON, KT. , 



GEOHfiE 



HAYES 



B IBB 1 IU ". H ( 
A RtPI BMC PICTCRt 



Carton, Comedy 

Chapter 8 "lying Cadets" 

FEATURE STARTS: 

2:00, 3:44, 5:28, 7:07, 8:51, 10:30 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

ANUARY 21ST AND 22ND 
Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 





WAR BONDS 



The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

ERLANGER KENTUCKY 







JACK 







A« 



•&t» 




JOHN HIDGtU. JOHN ALEXANDtft. CIAIO STtVMS 
tAMAIA MOWN • A I AN MOWMAY 

di,«.«i b, JAMES V. KERN 

ItcrtM Hoy b, J«mi V. Kara WM Som H.llmon • M- 
Wllll Dl»llg»» by Wilki. Mohon.r • Fro" *• Slofj. 
Fl.» kr '•**•» A. f ..Hi • Pfodwc.d by Mu Gofd.n J 

Also Latest News 

FEATURE STARTS 

Sun: 2:00, 4:14, 6:05, 7:59, 9:48 

Mon: 7:13, 9:25 



OMV Th«* Ml AT 

I \\ \l \Ki: M4l.\Ki 

VUiIiuiii \I»VKIMIMM. 

r ••;iimI vi»n"r»' 7 
liof <h<- mini 



The Answer to the 64-Nilfion Mar frettfki 

"Why Should I Bother About Tax Returns, Since My 

Withholds My Tta Frem My Salary Or Waferf" 

Thousand* of people hare been ttwn ^mpmdoii SMB 
paper headlinesthat the new ''simplified" tax lawwlU saw 
them the time and t«n*le of making out complicated tax re- 
Sm Others believe that since their ««*F^*" *" 
tax from meir salaries, this disposes of their tax P"*>l«n» 
idtogether. Others may not realise that the goremment may 
owe them a tax refund. 

These erroneous impressions will, it 1» ^ettamtad. cost taxpay- 
ersers $64,000,000 in unnecessary taxes, penalties and Interest 
charges. 

If you are one of those who have been laboring under these 
impressions, you will be Interested in seeing 

LENTS 



NO. 1 LLOYD AVE. 

Office Hrs. 6 to 9 p. m. 



Phone 



FLORENCE, KY. 
116 



MAN HAD BRICK IN HIS 
STOMACH FOR 10 YEARS 

One man recently stated'that for 
10 years he felt like he had a brick 
in his stomach. This feeling was 
due to the lump of undigested foor- 
he always had inside of him. He 
was weak, worn out, headachy, 
swollen with gas and terribly con- 
stipated. Recently he started tak- 
ing ERB-HELP and says the feel- 
ing like a brick in his stomach 
disappeared the second day. Bowels 
are regular ndw, gas and headaches 
are gone and he feels like a new- 
man. • 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. 



TUESDAY 

JANUARY 23RD 
DOUBLE FEATURE 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF O. P. DYE, DECEASED 

The Administrator of the estate 
of O. P. Dye, deceased, has filed 
his settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any person having 
exceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before Fberuary 
5, 1945 (next regular term of Coun- 
ty Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



NOTICE 

The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be In operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



20 



Used Cars 

MANY ARE GUARANTEED! 

CHYSLER SEDAN, 8-passenger 1090.00 

PONTIAC COUPE .... 350.00 

CHVEROLET COACH ., - 175.00 

DODGE TUDOR 963.00 

SUICK SEDAN ,. , 500.00 

PLYMOUTH COUPE 175.00 

CHEVROLET PANEL TRUCK 255.00 

OLDSMOBILE 4-DOOR TRUNK 

SEDAN - 650.00 

OLDSMOBILE CLUB COUPE 405.00 

DODGE COUPE 350.00 

NASH SEDAN 150.00 

TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

East 4th St. Covimrton COlonial 3884 



rr\ 




RONALD GRAHAM 
ANTHONY QUINN 
SHEILA RYAN 
Oircctodbr LOUS KING 
froducW by WILLIAM 
GUARD • Scratn Ploy 
by Wanda Tudiock . 



— Also — 



IDon'tSay-- 

"MY FEET ARE KILLING ME" 

DO SOMETHING 

ABOUT IT. 

DO THIS TOMORROW SURE I 

I No matter how many Arch Sup- 
ports or whatever kind of Shoes 
you were disappointed in time I 
after timer— 



Go To People's 

LEARN THE TRUTH ABOUT 
YOUR FEET 

lit Cost's You Nothingl 

WE HELPED THOUSANDS — 
WE CAN HELP YOU 

I Three Foot Comfort Specialists 

1 -~ ■ " Bull 1«^\ mill ~l..~ MMt'l 

J a FREE Honest Analysis on Your I 
I Feet. Learn the Truth about Your| 
I Feet — The whole truth. 




Frozen 



Foo 



Will Save You Money And Give 
- You The Foflowing Benefits: 



WED., and THURSDAY 
FRIDAY 

JANUARY 24TH, 25TH AND 26TH 




A SHIP WITH 
WINGS! 

mNWIJH 
GUTS! 

A STORY Of 
GlORYi 



Don't suffer Another Day— Put Your Feet In Our Hands 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 




(IHINM01 



DON AMECHE 
wiLLIAM EYTHE 

CHiiIh Bieklort 
Sir Cidiic Kirdiicki 



1. The average family saves $60.00 to $100.00 per year by us- 
ing locker service. 

2. You can butcher anytime of the year— summer or winter. 

3. 75 Percent less work required than in canning iruiia and 
vegetables. 



4. 



5. 



ii\ 



'Where Foot Comfort Begini" 
814-816 Madison Ave. Covington, Kentucky 



Also Color Cartoon "Angel Puss" 
FEATURE STARTS 7:1^9:03 



INVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
BUY WAR BONDS 

— —We Issue Them 



Preserve the garden-fresh flavor and food value of your 
own fruits and vegetables. * ;' 7* d: ■■ 

A locker will serve as your stock of fresh fruits, vegetables 
and meats. One locker will hold a quarter of beef and one 
hog or approximately 100 frying chickens or the equivalent 
in fresh fruits and vegetables. Restocked as needed it will 
serve as a year round supply of fresh fruits. 

6. You can serve roasting 1 ears, fresh cantaloupe or fried 
chicken for Christmas or any time during the year. 

V i l FROZEN FOOD lOflTCR 

WILL GIVE YOU ALL OF THESE ADVANTAGES 
AND STILL SAVE YOU MONEY 

GIVE IT YOUR SUPPORT! 



THURSDAY, JANUARY It, IMS 



Muunit unmix <*»v*,»~^ susiricTsr:, issn?* ' 



HEBRON l!S22£? 

The Lutheran 8unday Bcfcool haa [•f"** nt 
their election of officers Sunday I Goodridg 



Supt Woodford Crigler; 

superintendent, Chester 

ridge; secretary, Miss Helen 



I 



Plumbing - Heating - Electrical 

noreseent Bed Lamps, Ivory meUl f *** 

M» Bobber Trouble Lamp, complete ZM 

9* Extension Cords, approved «*» 

Klectric Iron Elements, fits all LOO 

Pipe Wrenches, 6" to £4", from 98 

| Meuldne Cabinets, steel SJ5 

Blow Torch, quality, 1 quart 5.45 

Electric Water Pomps, all types , 71.95 

I Gas Ranges, Oil Stores, Laundry Stores. . .5.95 

Towel Backs, White Steel . .., .*•* -55 

Laundry Trays, Twin Steel Reinforced 19.45 

Toilet Tank and Bowl, Brass Fitting 19.95 

Nite Latch Padlocks -59 

St Gal. Hot Water Boiler 19.95 

Cabinet Sink, complete 59.95 

Electric Water Heater, automatic 89.95 

Iron Cords, Approved 6' <■ 79 

Large White Stew Pots • • • 1-39 

PIPE - VALVES FITTING - R, E. A. WIRING 

LITE FIXTURES 

WINKLER STOKERS ON DISPLAY 

Bluegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) 
1X1 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5726 



State No. 73-706 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



I Hebron Deposit Bank 

Of Hebron in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 30, 1944. 

, ASSETS 

Loans and discounts $185,432.32 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 3.04,000.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures ,• • • 2,000.00 

Corporate Stocks 300.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, 

and cash items in process of collection 152,474.87 

Bank premises owned $1,000.00, furniture and fixtures $281.80 1,281.80 



.TOTAL 



ASSETS $645,488.99 

LIABILITIES ■ „ 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations .../...-...* $293,003.22 

Time...d.eposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 212,272.61 

r posits of United States Government (including 
postal savings 87,154.61 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $592,430.44 * 






TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) $592,430.44 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital* ........ I $ 25,500.00 

Surplus 15,500.00 

Undivided profits • ••• 12,058.55 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS I. , . 53,058.55 



L 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS... $645,488.99 

•This bank's capital consists of 300 shares common stock with total par 
value of $25,500.00. 

MEMORANDA 
, Pledged assets (and securities sloaned) (book value): 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $160,000.00 



TOTAL » $160,000.00 

Secured and preferred liabilities: « 

*" Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law $ 87,154.61 



TOTAL $ 87 y 154.61 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was .$ 32,979.23 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to 152,474.87 

I, John L. Conner, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemn- 
ly swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

JOHN L. CONNER, 
B. Nunnelley, Chas. W. Riley, C. Liston Hempfling, 



Rogers; treasurer, Joseph Hogan, 
Jr.; pianist, Mrs. Woodford Crigler; 
assistant pianist, Mrs. Geo. Thirs. 

W. R. Garnett left Thursday for 
St Petersburg, Fla., on a business 
trip. 

E. I. Rouse has been confined to 
his bed the past week, due to ill- 
ness. We wish him a speedy re- 
covery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Woodford Crigler 
entertained a group of relatives in 
honor of Mrs. Crigler's birthday, 
Sunday. The guests were Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Getker and family, of 
Ludlow, Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Rouse 
and children, Mr. and Mrs. Luther 
~ouse*r~^ 

Harold Utz of the U. S. Navy 
training camp at Great Lakes 
spent nine days with his family 
and relatives here. 

Mrs. Helen Whitely and Miss 
Marilyn Garnett, of Ludlow were 
the week-end guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. M. Garnett. 

The Missionary society of the 
Lutheran Church will hold their 
monthly meeting Wednesday aft 
ernoon. January 24 at 2 o'clock. 
Mrs. Liston Hempfling will be the 
leader. 

The many friends here of Geo 
Yates were grieved to hear of his 
sudden death at Springfield, Mo., 
last week. He was a graduate of 
Hebron High School. His wife and 
parents have the deep sympathy 
of their friends in this community. 

Chas. Riley was called to Frank- 
fort, Saturday, where his brother 
Edgar, was seriously ill and who 
passed away early Monday morn- 
ing. 

Mrs. Ed Peel entertained the 
Homemakers, last Wednesday. 

Mrs. Ida Bradshaw, of Ludlow 
spent from Friday until Sunday of 
last week with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Clore and son. 

Mrs. Emmett Kilgour called on 
Mrs. George Moore, Monday after- 
noon. 

Carvin Goodridge, who was in- 
ducted into the Army Dec. 30, is 
now stationed at Camp Blanding, 
Florida. 

Friends of Miss Jane Hollis are 
sorry to learn she has been on the 
sick list. 

Mrs. Liston Hempfling called on 
Mrs. Alice McGlasson, Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Cain, of 
Northport, Mich., are spending sev- 
eral weeks with her mother, Mrs. 
Carder. 

Mrs. Esten Snyder spent a few 
days last week with Mrs. Bessie 
Crisler of Cincinnati. 

Mrs. James Tanner called on 
Mrs. Earl Tanner and son of Er- 
langer, Friday. 

Mrs. Rose Crigler was removed 
to the St. Elizabeth Hospital last 
week for treatment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Kottmyer 
and Mrs. Chas. Hodges, Jr.; and 
daughter were supper guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer, Saturday 
evening. 



■ _ 



NOTICE! 

Any person failing to receive one of our calend- 
ars, please write or call and we will mail you one 
promptly. 

Chambers & Grubbs 

WALTON, * 



-:- 



KENTUCKY 



•> 



. . REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

orence Deposit Bank 

Of Florence in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 30, 1944. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including $12.16 overdrafts) $272,488.37 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 375,700.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures* . ,., 3,000.00 

Corporate stocks 1.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, Including reserve balances, 

and cash Items in process of collection,,. 227,265.17 

Bank premises owned 7 3,800.00 

Real estate owned other than bank premises * 2,489.25 



TOTAL ASSETS $884,743.79 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and" corporations •. . . .$468,653.72 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships/and corporations.. 255,316.78 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) f 92,024.44 

Leposits of States and political subdivisions 5,222.70 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc) 790.65 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $822,008.29 



TOTAL LIABILITIES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) $822,008.29 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS \ 

Capital* J^ $ 25,200.00 

Surplus 25,200.00 

Undivided profits • . . : 12,335.50 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 62,735.50 



HAMILTON 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson and 
son of Aurora, Ind., were Sunday 
guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Huff. Afternoon callers were 
Mrs. Rebecca Conley, Mrs. Bertha 
Huff, Mrs. Anna Huff and chil- 
dren Wilma and Gayle. 

Richard Tarline was at his camp 
Saturday. 

Roads at Hamilton remain too 
icy for safe traveling. 

Jack Eirston and Mr. Arnold 



spent Sunday at their camps. 

Word was received here the past 
week of toeMeath of. JimHamilton, 
son of CkaiHe lfciiS»»i#7fonnerly 
of this community. He passed away 
at the Hamilton County T. B. Hos- 
pital on January loth. He leaves 
his wife and two sons 21 and IS 
years of age. Sympathy is extend- 
ed his loved ones. 

Lewis Ryle and Henry Blanchett 
have finished stripping tobacco. 



v 

: — 7 — 



■£•** 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

Of Burlington in the State of Kentucky at the close' of business 
on December 30, 1944. "■/ 

ASSETS - / 

Loans and discounts .';". $ 373,170.99 

United States Government obligations, direct 

and guaranteed .,.77..%. .A 986,490.63 

Obligations of States and' political subdivisions 1,000.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures 46,751.00 

Corporate stocks !,..'.1»J..( "... 13.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, 

and cash items in process of collection 237,885.31 

Bank premises owned $15,000.00, furniture 

and fixtures $1.00 , " 19,001.00 

Real estate owned other than bank premises . . 1.00 



TOTAL ASSETS * $1,660,318.93 

LIABILITIES 






Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $ 532,457.97 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations 666,857.87 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 

Deposits of banks m ; 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc.) ! 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $1,440,742.89 



>••••••••••• 



134,642.67 

101,673.30 

5,000.00 

111.08 



TOTAL LIABDLTTnsS (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) ; $1,440,742.89 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital* • $ 50,000.00 

Surplus >...., U50.000.00 

Undivided profits 19,576,04 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS , ..; 219576.04 



VERONA 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $884,743.79 

"This bank's capital consists of 1400 shares common^ stock with total 
par value of $25^00.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value) : 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $220,000.00 



.$220,000.00 



. TOTAL 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law . . . .$ 91,929.97 



s. 



Correct — Attest: 
Directors. 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, 



ss: 



Sworn to and subscribed before me this 10th day of January, 1945 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

ELMER GOODRIDGE, Notary Public. ^ 

My commission expires March 29, 1946. 



State No. 73-433 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



Citizens Deposit Bank 

Of Grant in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 30th, 1944. 

■ 'ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including $1,14 overdrafts) $ 71,558.70 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 94,535.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 2,925.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures ZZ, ... . -^ . 10,395.00 

Corporate stocks 151.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, 

and cash items in process of collection 80,259.41 

Bank premises owned $3,687.00, furniture and fixtures $1,024.00 4,711.00 



TOTA&ASSETS $264,535.11 

LIABILITIES ! ,,.-:.. 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 

and corporations $149,553.87 



Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 

Other deposits (certified and officers' checks, etc.) . , 

TOTAL DEPOSITS . .$221,206.56 



71,642.69 
10.00 



TOTAL LIABHTnES (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) $221,206.56 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

capital* : : , v $ i5,ooo.oo 

Surplus '. 15,767.50 

Undivided profits 12,561.05 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 43,328.55 



TOTAL LIABrLTTnCS AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $264,535.11 

•This bank's capital consists of 600 shares common stock with total par 
value of $15,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was 12,618-87 



Gerdie Harris, who was injured 
last week is doing as well as could 
be expected. 

Mrs. Nick CcCormick is convales- 
cing at her home. 

Mrs. Rose Jenkins is spending 
the Winter with her daughter at 
Sanders. 

Mrs. Rose Hamilton, who has, 
been ill at her home is improved." 

The Homemakers are serving 
lunch at the Hunt sale, January 20. 
The returns will be used to help 
the hospital at Ft. Thomas. Each 
member is to donate 2 quarts of 
vegetable mixture and two pies. 
Anyone wishing to help this cause 
may bring any of the above don- 
ations. 

A. C. Roberts is still confined to 
his home. 

T-Sgt. Ben Kannady, who has 
been home on furlough, visiting his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Kan- 
nady and other relatives and 
friends, returned to the hospital in 
North Cardlina, last week. 

Mrs. Johnny Boyer has been 
confined to her home the last few 
days with a sore throat. 

Mrs. Lunsford has moved to the 
house which she bought from 
Walter Renaker. 

Leonard Brewster has moved to 
the Madden house in Verona and 
Raymond Beach has moved to Will 
McCormick's house. 

Prayer meeting held each Sat- 
urday night and Sunday School 
and Church on Sunday, Jan. 21. 



TOTAL $ 91,029.97 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits*of this bank was $ 47,327.91 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted^ to $227,265.17 

I, J. B. Doan, of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear-affirm 
that the above statement is true, and that it fully and correctly repre- 
sents the true state of -the several matters herein contained and set 
forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. • 

J. B. DOAN, 
Correct — Attest: W.*R. Davis^ John Delahunty, C. F. Blankenbeker, Di- 
rectors. * r.- >k! mi 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 8th day of January, 1945, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

SARAH ROLAND, Notary Public. . 
My commission expires sMarch 7th, 1948. 



TOTAL LLABIXnTES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $1,660,318.93 

"This bank's capital consists of 500 shares common stock with total par 
value of $50,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value) : 
. U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $ 487,500.00 

Assets pledged to qualify for exercise of fiduciary 
or corporate powers, and for purposes other 
than to secure liabilities 27,524.00 



.$ 515,024.00 



TOTAL ; 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

requirements of law $ 141,287.83 



.$141,287.83 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



State No. 73-619 



DEVON 



Mrs. Frank Bresser received 
slight injuries in a fall on the ice 
at her home Tuesday. We wish for 
her a speedy recovery. 

This neighborhood is busy butch 
ering hogs this week. 

Randolph Scott infant son of Mr. 
and Mrs. West Scott received severe 
burns when a kettle of boiling wat- 
er overturned on him. We wish 
him a speedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Horton, Mrs. 
Francis McGuire and Rev. and 



Union Deposit Bank 

Of Union in the State of Kentucky at the close of business on 
December 30, 1944. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including 71 cents overdrafts) $115,912.82 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 169,700.00 
Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, 

and cash items in process of collection 188,559.40 

Bank premises owned j, . 800.00 

Other assets Jf . 34.35 



TOTAL ,...-. ; . . . , 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits of this bank was «, $ 73,177.68 

Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to 287,885.31 

I, G. S. Kelly, Cashier, of the above-named bank; do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

O. S. KELLY 
Correct— Attest* S. B. Nunnelley, W. P. Beemon, A. B. Renaker, Directors 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 9th day of January, 1945, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

CHAS. W. RDLEY, Notary Public. 
My commission expires Jan. 8, 1948. 



TOTAL ASSETS .$475,006.57 

LIABILITIES 

Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, 



and corporations " $297,206.0* Deman<1 deposits of individuals, partnerships, 



Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $430,658.90 

Other liabilities 



88,992.69 

44,480.18 

75.00 



TOTAL LIABBlrrnss (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) «$430 733 90 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 

Capital* ; $ 25;000.00 

Surplus 10,000.00 

Undivided profits .;•... 9 272 67 

TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS ..'..." 44*272 67 



TOTAL LIABDLITIES AND CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $475,006.57 

♦This bank's capital consists of 250 shares common stock with total 
par value of $25,000.00. 

MEMORANDA 
Pledged assess (and securities loaned) (book value) 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

FARMERS BANK 

Of Petersburg in the State of Kentucky at the close of business 
on December 30, 1944. 

ASSETS 

Loans and discounts (including $180.85 overdrafts) $ 49,404.71 

United States Government obligations, direct and guaranteed 116,600.00 

Obligations of States and political subdivisions 2,970.00 

Other bonds, notes, and debentures k 3]466.25 

Corporate stocks ' 200.00 

Cash, balances with other banks, including reserve balances, 

and cash items in process of collection 64,021.79- 

Bank premises owned $550.00, furniture and fixtures $350.00, . 900.00 



TOTAL ASSETS, .". $237,582.75 

LIABnjTIES 



B 



and corporations , ^ $128,480.78 

Time deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations. . 47,588!l3 
Deposits of United States Government (including 

postal savings) 16,323.70 

Deposits of States and political subdivisions 5 021 82 

TOTAL DEPOSITS $.197,233.58 

Other liabilities 109.85 



TOTAL LIABHilTHSS (not including subordinated 

obligations shown below) ...;.. $197,524.08 

CAPITAL ACCOUNTS 
CaP"* 1 * •' . 4 25J0O0.0O 



1 ' s . 
....................... 



U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 
\ pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities . . 

TOTAL ...> 

Secured and preferred liabilities: 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 



.$ 50,000.00 



»••••• 



-TV 



...$ 50,000.00 



to requirements of law ......$ 44,460.16 



Surplus 

Undivided profits 

Reserves (and retirement account for preferred capital). 



6,000.00 
6,244.72 
2,793.95 



TOTAL CAPITAL ACCOUNTS $237,562.75 

♦This bank's capital consists of 250 shares common stock with total par 
value of $25,000.00. 

MEMORANDA t 

Pledged assets (and securities loaned) (book value?: 
U. S. Government obligations, direct and guaranteed, 

pledged to secure deposits and other liabilities $ 41,000.00 



reserve amounts to 80,259.41 

■ "I, C. E. McNeely, Cashier, of the above-nanled bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

C. E. McNEELY, Cashier 
Correct— Attest: A. Rogers, J. D. McNeely, John W. Rogers, Directors. 
State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 11th day 1;^l"j&»uary, 1945, 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 

G. 8. KELLY, Notary Public 
My commission expires Feb. 27, 1945. 



TOTAL „. $H460.16 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 

deposits^ this bank was . . . .$ 26,586.41 1 

iCoxi v c ainuuuuwu vu - , »....,. 174 144 iitt 

X, Lillian Bristow, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemn- 
ly swear-affirm that the aHfeve statement is true, and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the best of my knowledge and belief. . 

, LILUAN BRESTOW, Cashier 
Correct— Attest: Thos. Huff, James A. Huey, C. F. Blankenbeker, Direct- 
ors." 

State of Kentucky, 
County of Boone, ss: %*\ 

Sworn to and subscribed befere me this 6th day of January, 1945, 
and I hereby certify that I am nonan officer or director" of this bank. ' 

SUE K. BRISTOW, Notary Public Boone Co. Ky. 
My commission expires April 3, 1945. 



TOTAL $41,000.00 

Secured and preferred liabilities : 

Deposits secured by pledged assets pursuant 

to requirements of law .$ 18,323.70 



Mrs. Sam Hogan called on Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert Wood and son Chas.. I Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

niuajl <~ VCllHlg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Shields, Mr. 
and Mrs. Joe Wood and son, Mar- 
garet and Betty Wood called on 
their uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Wood and son Charles, Saturday 
evening. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
and daughter called on James and 
Benta Snow Sunday afternoon. 

Sgt. Charles R. Wood left Sun- 
day afternoon for Topeka, Kans., 
after spending a thirty-day fur- 
lough with home folk. 



TOTAL j 16,323.70 

On date of report the required legal reserve against 



j — .-,„«*. 



Assets reported above which were eligible as legal 

reserve amounted to \ ....... . 64,021.79 

I, J. H. Huey, Cashier, of the above-named bank, do solemnly 
swear-affirm that the above statement Is truey and that it fully and 
correctly represents the true state of the several matters herein con- 
tained and set forth, to the-best of my knowledge and belief. 

J. H. HUEY 
Correct— Attest: Bernard Rogers, B. H. Berkshire, J. W. Grant, Directors 

State of Kentucky, ; 

County of Boone, ss: 

Sworn to and. subscribed before me this 13th day of January, 1945 
and I hereby certify that I am not an officer or director of this bank. 



O, S. WATTS, Notary Public. 
My commission expires vfiuly 1, 1946. 




THE BOONE COUNTY 



BURLINGTON, 



f ■ , 



— 



, JAJfUASY It* 



JIIIIIIIIIM 

I Seen And Heard Around | 
The County Seat | 



"iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii 

Mis* Betty Cason, Mrs. O. T. Ed- 
wards and D. H. Norris visited the 
blood bank In Cincinnati, last Fri- 
day. - " -~ 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Klrkpatrlck 
were shopping in Covington, last 
Friday* 

Sgt. Francis Souther, of Maiden, 
Missouri, who Is spending a fur- 
lough with his wife and daughter, 
of Florence, called on friends here 
several days last week. 

Bert Gaines is somewhat improv- 
ed after a recent illness. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIP 

Mrs. Nannie Riddell hasnt been 
so well for the past few days. 

Mrs. Katherlne Cropper enter- 
tained a number of friends with a 
party last Thursday evening. The 
guests were Misses Estella Huey, 
Marjorie Craig, Ruth Kelly, Mary 
Bess Cropper, Mrs. Mary Evelyn 
Porter, Mrs. Isabelle Cropper, Mrs. 
Doretta Rouse, Mrs. Helen Clore, 
Mrs. Lois McBee, Mrs. Katherlne 
Brown and Mrs. Pauline Smith. 

Allen Sullivan, of tjie U. S. Navy, 
and his wife and children, of Cov- 



J 



N 

X 
H 

I 

3 

X 
M 

I 

Z 
M 



OWN YOUR OWN HOME 

If you have a reasonable amount to pay down on a 
home or a farm, come in and talk with us. We may 
be able to help you. We are anxious to make mort- 
gage loans and will take pleasure in discussing the 
matter with you. 

We will not encourage you to go in debt beyond 
your ability to pay, over a reasonable period of 
years. 

The interest rate will be 5%. Our discussion con- 
fidential. , 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation , 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $150,000.00 

IMXI«MXM*M«M»H«1IXMXMXMXM«M»H«H«M«M«NXII«HXH»IIKM«M«H 



mgg^ggg SaBliBaS SB SBBEBBB^^mm 



'wT4»Sv 



7 




Women in Seihriee Work 
Applaud these Styles! 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like for your 
hours on duty . .. feminine and flattering for your gala even- 
ings 1 Get your go-everywhere hairstyle today! 

A LaRose Permanent will Make it last and last „ 

RESTYLING-CUT, SHAMpW§ET ....$2.00 

LaRose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY tfRLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Collins, Prop. 

IMBEBgglEBfflgBBgggJ! WM 



TkVl MM kW»W,»\VkWlWkY/ 



ington, were guests Sunday of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry May. 

Mrs. William Huey was a dinner 
guest of Mr. and ^rs^ul, jpbrfe, 
Friday evening. 

Mrs. William Townsend, Mrs. C. 
L. Cropper, Mrs. Vernon Pope, Miss 
Mary Bess Cropper, Mrs. Helen 
Snyder and Miss Mary Hood Glll- 
aspie attended the dedication of 
the room furnished by Boone Coun- 
ty at the Army Air Force Convales- 
cent Hospital at Ft. Thomas, Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

'Mrs. Charles Benson and daugh- 
Karen Sue, Visited relatives in 
ivlngton, recently. . 

F. H. Rouse, secretary of the 
Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance 
Co:, of Boone County, has been ill 
at his home In Burlington for the 
kst several days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cam Kennedy, of 
Florence spent Sunday at Warsaw, 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Sisson, 
and attended the funeral of John 
Ewoanks, of Steels Bottom. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Finn enter- 
tained their children Sunday with 
a lovely turkey dinner. Other 
guests were Miss Louise McArthur, 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hodges and Rob- 
ert Nixon. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Benson and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. 
George P. Nicholson, of Walton, 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. William , Townsend enter- 
tained a number of friends at her 
home Thursday evening. Quests 
were Mrs. Roscoe Akin, Mrs. Frank 
Maurer, Mrs. Luther Smith, Mrs. 
Raymond Combs and Mrs. Pete 
Stephens. . 

Miss Lucille Cotton visited her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Cotton 
and daughter Ruby, of Latonia, on 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Grover Jarrell spent sever- 
al days last week • with Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Middendorf, of Cincin- 
nati. 

Mr. and Mrs Frank Maurer and 
daughter entertained a number of 
friends at dinner, Saturday even- 
ing. 

Cpl. Marvin Rouse Porter re- 
turned Friday night to Langley 
Field, Virginia, after spending a 
fifteen-day furlough with his par- 



ents, Mr. and Mas. George Porter. 
Cpl. James Gayle Smith spen£ 

several days **** week ***& ]&* 

parents, Mr. And Mrs. Earl Smith 

and son. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Lee Huey held a 
family dinner at their home Sun- 
day in honor of Cpl. James G. 
Smith. XEhose -present were Mr. 
and Mrs. Earle Smith and Joe, Mr. 
and Mrs. Al Stephens, Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Brown and children, 
and Russell Smith and Mrs. Minnie 
Smith. 

__ *_— - 

OFFICERS NAMED 

t 

The officers, elected for the Earl 
Parker Intermediate R. A. Chapter 
of the Burlington Baptist Church 
were A. W. Weaver, Counselor; Joe 
Smith, Ambassador in Chief; Ray 
Patterson, first Assistant Ambass- 
ador in Chief; Bob Brown, Chapter 
Scribe and Recorder; Phillip Yelton 
Chapter Herald. This chapter has 
made wonderful progress the past 
year and it is considered one of 
the best chapters In Northern Ken- 
tucky. 



SPECIAL PURCHASE SALE 

UNDERWEAR 



Pre-War Merchandise 

BOYS' 2-PC. 

Shirt- Drawers 

Short sleeve— Knee length. Sizes 6 
to 12— SET _: 



79e 

BOYS' . GIRLS' *-PC. 



Blood Donors Needed 

An appointment has" been made 
for ten blood donors at the Blood 
Donor Center in Cincinnati on 
Friday, January 19 at 1 p. m. Those 
planning to attend are asked to 
refrain from eating four hours 
prior to giving blood. Anyone de- 
siring to donate a pint of blood to 
the armed forces Is asked to notify 
Mrs. Lou Pope, or call Burlington 
473. 



Shirt - Drawers 

Fleece lined. Long sleeve — Ankle 
lengths. Sizes 4 te 12— SET 

98c 



Moat Sensational Sale Ever Offered 
MEN'S PART WOOL 

SOCKS 

Fancy colon. All 

C 



3 PAIRS. 



••••««*•• 



$1.00 



MEN'S 



SOCKS 

Full mercerized. First quality. 
Brown only. All sizes. — PAIR 



Promoted In France 

William L. Smith, Sr., of Union, 
was promoted to the rank of staff 
sergea.it while serving with the 
cavalry in Prance. 

S.-Sgt. Smith is the son of Mrs. 
Sally Smith of Burlington R. 2, 
and husband of Mrs. Delores Smith 
of Erlanger, Ky. He served at 
Camp Livingston, La., and Camp 
Hood, Texas. 



Ladies 7 Union Suits 

Some slightly soiled. Sizes 36 to 44 

49c 



Straps — Built-up shoulder. Half 
sleeve. 



29c 



.85c 



LADIES' 

Cotton Hose 

All sizes. All shades. -Buy several 
pairs at these prices — - 



Ladies' Vests 2Qc - 25c 




MEN WANTED 1 1 infants' Stockings 



18 TO 50 YEARS <JLD 

ESSENTIAL WAR INDUSTRY 
GRAIN ELEVATOR & FEED MILL 



Steady Employment 



*i 



Must Comply with W. M. C. Regulations 
* APPLY 

LAWRENCEBURG TERMINAL 
ELEVATOR CORP. 

LAWRENCEBURG, INDIANA 



19c 

OTHERS 29c - 39c 

Men's Union Suits 

Medium weight — Broken sizes. 

98c 



LADIES' — FIRST QUALITY 

HOSIERY 

Super sheer for evening wear. 
All shades— PAIR 



96c 



WHITE 



ALL SIZES— PAIR 

20c 



Cotton Socks 

Long top — All sizes— PAIR 

19c 

6 PAIRS FOR 85c 

STURDY WORK SOCKS. | Eft 
Hvy. cotton knit. All sizes.Pr *^*» 



l| Receiving Blankets 

30x40. White with blue or pink 
border 



The Home Store 

uiimiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^uiiiiJiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiii'.Miiiii 

WAR BONDS 



JELLIES, CRANBERRY SAUCE 1 lb. 40 ptj 25o 

VAN CAMPS CHILI CON CARNE. 1 lb. 1 oz. 40c 

ZIGLER'S PEACHES - ........60 points 28c 

WHITE VILLA APRICOTS a *° points 37c 

WHITE VILLA FRUIT COCKTAIL - .60 points 37c 

WHITE VILLA APPLE SAUCE .20 'points 18c 

APPLE CHERRY PRESERVES . . 2 lbs. 50c 

APPLE RASPBERRY PRESERVES • . 2 lbs. 35c 

SWEET MIXED PICKLES 15 oz. 32c 

SWEET GREEN SLICED TOMATO PICKLES jar 33c 

VEGETABLE RELISH '...13V4 MJ 25c 

____^_ 

,••■*-«*■' 

BOYS' LEATHER JACKETS .•.." 58-50 

1 MANS* SUEDE JACKET, size 42 . . . $9-50 

1 MEN'S LEATHER JACKET, size 40 . . t $10.50 

100 LB. SHELLED CORN $2.80 

100 LB. CRACKED CORN v ......... ....-,:.. .- $2.90 

100 LB. SCRATCH FEED .$3.25 

100 LB. 32% DAIRY $3.30 

100 LB. 24% DAIRY . . .'. $3.20 

100 LB. DEARBORN HOG and PIG RATION $3.50 

100 LB. 16% DAIRY T. . \ .' $3.00 

100 LB. WHEAT MIDDLINGS $2.65 

<m »w» wtrr-wr ****»?¥» . . / «9fii; 

100 LB. SOYBEAN MEAL **J. $3.10 

100 LB. DEARBORN LAYING MASH $3.65 



GULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 




BLANKETS 



PEPPERELL 



39c 



PEPPEREbL 



PART WOOL 



Sheet Blankets 

70x80. Striped 

1.98 



Crib Blankets 

30x40. Colors: Blue and pink 

69c 



PEPPERELL 



Crib Blankets 

30x50. Colors: Blue or pink. 
Satin Binding 

98c 



No Phone Orders • No Layaways 
No Refunds 



Mar-Ray Blankets 

72x84. Satin binding. Floral patterns 

4.98 

JUST ARRIVED 

Print Dresses 

1 to 6X. Beautiful Patterns 

... 



ALL ELASTIC ' 

Belts 

Small, medium, large and extra large 



29c 



i 



ELASTIC AND GARTER RUBBER 







} 



** 



^^™ 



1 ■ 



T" 



IMVMM/at, 



tw« wwiNl COTTNTV R«cniU>KR. BTJMJNGTON. KENTUCKY 






TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE Or JANUARY 25, IMS 



Petersburg 

Mrs. Elihue Alden spent Thurs- 
day in Cincinnati, Ohio, with her 
husband who is in Christ hospital 
for treatment. 

Mrs. Max T. Gridley has returned 
to her home in St. Louis, Mo., after 
spending a few weeks with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Berk- 
shire. 

Betleview 

Miss Anna Cason la at the bed- 
side of her sister, Mrs. Richard 
Marshall, who is quite ill. 



W. L TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 
correction and 
protection of 
EYESIGHT .-. 



* 27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



WANTED! 

All kinds of Band Instru- 
ments — Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxaphones; 
etc. 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 



540 Madison 



HE. 7413 



Mr. and Mrs. Shelton Stephens 
spent several days the past week 
with her mother, Mrs. Louise Aylor 
of Petersburg. 

Rabbit Hash 

Charles Stephens has about re- 
covered from a recent illness. 

Ezra Aylor purchased two Chest- 
erwhite hogs from 8. B. Ryle last 
week. 

Grant R. D. 

Mrs. Ida Conner entertained with 
a Vlctrola dance Wednesday night. 

Miss Ida Mae Wilson won the 
cake in the beauty contest at the 
haU Friday night. 

Idlewild 

Mr*. William L. Berkshire spent 
the mid-week with her friends Mrs. 
William Brown, near Belleview. 

Mrs. W. M. Rachal; Miss Norma 
Winter Rachal, and Mr. John M. 
Rachal, of Union, were mid-week 
guests of their kinswoman, Mrs. J. 
S. Asbury. 

Lower Gunpowder 

Edward Shinkle and family spent 
last Sunday with Loren Abdon and 
family of Richwood neighborhood. 

La Verne Sebree spent Thursday 
night With Ruben Klrtley. 
Hopeful 

Ethel Mae Barlow spent Satur- 
day and Sunday with her grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Bar- 
low. 

Mrs. Owen Aylor spent a few 
days the past week with her 
daughter, Mrs. Will Snyder. 
Verona 

Mrs. A. A. Allphln, who has pneu- 
monia, is getting along nicely. 

Mrs. J. M. Powers is spending a 
few days with her daughter, Mrs. 
Mandia Johnson, of Latonia. 
Beaver Lick 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Anderson 
had as guests last week, her sister 
and husband of New Baltimore, O. 

Mrs. Carrie Miller spent several 
days last week with relatives at 
Constance. 

Constance 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Pugate are 
the proud parents of a baby boy, 



bora Sunday, January 18, 1026. 

Mr. Harvey Latham was In Con- 
stance dialling on his aunt, Mrs. W. 

A. Kenyon, Monday morning. 

Nonpariel Park 

Mrs. J. T. Williams and daugh- 
ters of Bullittsville, Ky., igaited 
Mrs. Ola Carpenter, last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith are 
parents of a fine girl, Virginia 
Frances. 

Gunpowder 

H. F. Utz and family visited last 
Sunday and were guests of Mrs. 
Alice Daughters. 

Elbert Rice, of Covington was In 
our town, Monday. a— £ . 

, Burlington 

Howard Kirkpatrick, our lino- 
type operator, has been sick the 
past few days, and is still unable 
to be at his post. 

Ed Slayback, wife and daughter, 
of Crescent Springs were -guests of 

B. B. Hume and wife, Sunday aft- 
ernoon. 





3JP5EB 



ODR JOB 

PRINTING 

IS RIGHT IN 
THE GROOVE 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 
FREE CHECKING 

R. Michels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St Covington, Ky. 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF EMILY MORRIS, DECEASED 

The Executor of the estate of 
Emily Morris, deceased, has filed 
his settlement in the Boone Coun- 
ty Court and any person having 
exceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before February 
5, 1945, (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF WALTER SOWDER, DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of Walter Sowder, deceased, has 
filed her settlement in the Boone 
County Court and any person hav- 
ing exceptions to file to the settle- 
ment must do so on or before Feb- 
ruary 5, 1945 feext regular term of 
County Court)* 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF C. S FELDHAUS, DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of C. S. Feldhaus, deceased, has 
filed her settlement in the Boone 
County Court and any person hav- 
ing exceptions to file to the settle- 
ment must do so on or before Feb- 
ruary 5, 1945 (next regular term of 
County Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Children's Feet 



N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at — . 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



AT 3:00 P. MT 

LOCATED JUST OFF KENTA^bo DRIVE, ABOUT 3 
SQUARES FROM U. S. 25. MR. AMD MRS. HENRY HUNLEY 
HAVE CONTRACTED WITH US TO SELL THIS PROPERTY ' 
AT ABSOLUTE AUCTION ON THE ABOVE DATE. 

This property consists of a good three-room frame cottage, in 
good repair. It is amply supplied with water. The lot is 100x100 
feet, affording a good chicken run. Directly adjoining this prop-, 

erty there is another roomy lot available. 

■ ■••.-. 

— — - - - - . • ■ ■ » 

A 

* * * 

—Attractive Term s _ 

Coi, Lute Bradford 

Realtor ~ Auctioneer \ 

Telephone Flo. 750 Union, Kentucky 



Ninety-nine out of a hundred 
babies are born with good feet, 
even if they do appear to be flat 
at the start. We say babies are 
born with flat feet because the 
bony masses In a new-born baby's 
feet are held in place by fat pads. 
As the baby starts to stand and 
walk, these fatty pads are absorb- 
ed and muscles take their place. 
But about the third year the arch 
of the foot should be pretty well 
defined if the child is going to 
have any arch. We say if, because 
everyone is not meant to have the 
same color of hair or eyes. 

Perhaps when the child starts to 
stand he is overweight, or under- 
nourished or has gone through a 
serious illness. In that event the 
muscles may not develop enough to 
produce an arch in the foot. He 
then grows with a natural flat 
foot. The condition is rarely pain- 
ful. However, many cases of flat 
feet can be averted if the child Is 
provided with shoes that hold the 
weak foot in alignment. Such 
shoes are usually wedged slightly 
under the inner border of the neel 
bone. This prevents tipping in 
of the ankles and by over cor- 
rection has a tendency to cause 
the muscles on the inner border of 
the leg to shorten: These muscles 
are the ones which keep the foot 
arched. — Adv. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST W. M. S. 

The W. M. S. of Burlington Bap- 
tist Church met at the church on 
January 10 at 2:30 p. m. The meet- 
ing was opened by singing "How 
Firm a Foundation" followed by a 
devotional message, given by the 
president, Mrs. Noel Walton. 

A most interesting and very in- 
structive program was rendered, 
under the efficient leadership of 
Mrs. Walter Brown: "History of 
Baptist in America Before 1845," 
and "The Organization of South- 
ern Baptist Convention in 1845" 
was ably explained by Mrs. Irvin 
Rouse. 

Mrs. Earle Smith gave a fine, Il- 
lustrated discussion pf "A Century 
of Progress, lor Southern Conven- 
tion and W. M. U." Mrs. Walter 
Brown closed the presentation with 
details of the Centennial plans. 

During the business session, 
plans for the year were outlined 
and discussed. The membership 
Is happy' to announce that the 
standard of excellence was attain- 
ed by all organizations for 1944. 

The Intermediate and Junior G. 
A.'s gave a Christmas party Dec. 
23, at which the honor guest, was 
Kathryn Simmons of Protestant 
Orphans* Home of Devou Park, Ky. 
Delightful entertainment was pro- 
vided, delicious refreshments serv- 
ed, and beautiful and useful gifts 
were presented little Miss Simmons 
who has been the object of their 
community mitsion for the past 
year. 

The W. M. S. officers for the year 
1945 are: President, Mrs. Noel Wal- 
ton; 1st vice president, Mrs. Irvin 
Rouse; 2nd vice president, Mrs. 
Walter Brown; 3rd vice president, 
Mrs. Courtney Kelly; secretary ^ind 
treasurer Mrs. Thomas Hensley; 
stewardship chairman, Mrs. Ted 
Hambrick; community missions, 
Mrs. Less McBee; publicity chair- 
man, Ruth M. Kelly. 

Counselors for the Junior organ- 
ization are: Young People's Leader, 
Mrs. Courtney Kelly; Intermediate 
G. A.'s, Mrs. Robt. Clore; Junior G. 
A.'s, Mrs. Noel Walton; Intermedi- 
ate R. A.'s, Albert W. Weaver; Jun- 
ior R. A.5s, Mrs. Less McBee; 
Sunbeams, Mrs. Ted Hambrick. ' 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. L. M. Hamilton, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:00 a. m. (CWT). John Whitaker, 
Supt. 
Morning Worship at ll a. m. , 
Evening Worship at 7:30. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 7:30. 

We invite you to come and wor 
ship with us. 







N 




CVfeor, comfortaftl* virion 
■ii tnfy a mmtttieJ Mid tt> 
education . . . faulty eyt- 
sight aaiiouwtf rafrrdm X 



DRJ.O.TYSON 

OFFICE AT 

MOTCH 

THE JEWELERS 

613 15 MADISON GV, COVINGTON 

SINCC /BS7 



gHSHXHXHSHXHXHXHSHXHXHa 
NEW and CLEAN 



Used Furniture 



IHXg 

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II 

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| Madison Furniture I 
L^ Store H 



432-434 Madison Ave. 



| Covittgton. -:- Kentucky * 

VJXHXHriK^MXHXWaeMXKJglUXMXMXwS 



msm 



Eyes 

Are You Irritable— Nervous? 
Perhaps your eyes are the 
cause. An examination may 
reveal it. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covingrton 

Phone HEmlock 0700 



Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining* luster. We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking cutis. 
Open evening by appointment 



Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF HATTIE BERKSHIRE, 
DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of Hattie Berkshire, deceased, has 
filed her settlement In the Boone 
County Court and any person hav- 
ing exceptions to file to the settle- 
ment must do so on or before Feb- 
ruary 5, 1945 (next regular term of 
County Court). 

I C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 

Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 

SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF OMER ATHA, DECEASED? 

The Executrix of the estate of 
Omer Atha, deceased, has filed her 
settlement In the Boone County 
Court and any person having ex- 
ceptions to file to the settlement 
must do so on or before February 
5, 1945 (next regular torm of Coun- 
ty Court). 

C. D. BENSON, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



BULLITTSVILLE HOMEMAKERS 

The BUlllttsvlllle- ^Hom emakers 
will hold their monthly meeting 
January 18 at the home of Mrs. 
Burnam Roberts. All members are 
urged to be present and asked to 
bring their neighbor. 

Mrs. M. M. L*fes. 



Homemakers In Fleming county 
have reflnished 108 floors, Sham- 
pooed 105 rugs, redecorated 148 
rooms and changed 195 window 
treatments. 



DR. A. W. HOPPER 

CHIROPRATIC PHYSICIAN 

ADAMS BUILDING 

433 Madison Avenue 

Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10-12 A. M., 8-5, 7-8 P. M. 
EXCEPT THURSDAYS AND SUN- 
DAYS. 

COlonial 9544 



u 



Baby 
Chicks 

POULTRY EQUIPMENT 

POULTRY - DA IRY, - 
, HOG FEED 

DR. SALSBURY REMEDIES 
Figaro Meat Curing Products 

HUGO I LANG 

Ful-O-Pep and Dr. Heinz 
Feeds 




512 Pike St.. Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 9188 
OPEN TILL 7 P. M. DAILY 



FARMERS! 

Stop in and get our spring prices on: 

GRASS SEEDS - FERTILIZER - UBIKO FEEDS 

ELECTRICAL WIRING} 

FLORENCE FEED AND ELECTRIC 

STORE 

RAYMOND GROSS, Proi 



GENERAL HAULING 

, DAY OR NIGHT 

LIVESTOCK and TOBACCO 

RUSSELL MILLER, JR. 

Phone Florence 823 Union, Ky., R. 1. 



'jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiit: 

| PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. f 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

I fATJ 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 



s 
I 



<iimiiiiimiiiimmmmii iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiK; 



JUST RELEASED! 

HEAVY CAST ALUMINUM $4^.95 
2-qt. Sauce Pan .-.* ^ 

10 '/i- INCH FRYING $<^75 

PAN ^ 

7^PC. CUTLERY SET 

Stainless steel; 7 different $«^.95 
type knives Mth holder* all ^p 

PAT'S CHINA STORE 

Also J Location of 
GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 Madison 1 Cov. HE. 4988 



ALUMINUM PAINT 

Dutch Standard chrcjff- $«^.95 
atic Aluminum Paint t? ^BGal. 



"Red Hot" Aluminum for $* .75 
furnaces, heaters ........ J, qt. 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



VALENTINE 
DAY 



THE TIME— 

February 14, St. Valentine's 
Day, when most folkk^aW 
just a bit sentimental, and 
send mementos of different 
kinds. 

THE GIRLr- 



Any lady from 6 to 60 who 
likes to be beautiful in body 
and soul and — somebody's 
valentine. 

and- THE PLACE— 

STEVENS STUDIOS, where 
good portraits and photo- 
graphs are made. When you 
see the big valentine in- our 
window, you will agree that a 
good photograph is what you 
want to send. 

§\ 

No appointment needed. ,- 
Open Saturdays to 9:00 
— Monday thru Friday to 
6:00 in the evening. 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 



JANUARY 



CLEARAN 



■ ■ . * 

Entire stock of Men's, Ladies and 
""^"Childdren's clothing at 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES 

■ * f ■ __ 

You get more for your money 
wr>en you 1>uy "Star Brand," 
"Pdll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sd*J bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



/ 



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# 



— 










— — 



— 



■ ' ' 



tmommxw, umum* u, vm 



FLORENCE 



recently to the farm they purchas- 
ed tram Sam Roberta, near Dixie 
Sidney Ambrose and wife of nearjHWwray. 
BulUttavine, were Sunday guests of Hating sold Ms farm to a Mr. 
the J. T. Stephensons. | HM** « «*«*• * * J*"" 

R. F. Woodward and wife moved and wife moved lart Tuesday to 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



L.JMETICER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 
o3i Madison Ave.> Covington, H\ 



her farm on Highway 42. 

OpL John Robert Darby, of Aus- 
tralia, is enjoying a furlough with 
relatives and friends here. 

Eldrldge Carpenter and family 
were guests of his parents Theo- 
dore Carpenter and wife, last Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Stella Carpenter visited her 
aunt, Mrs. Jennie Dobbins, last Fri- 
day. 

Frank Rouse, of Walton visited 
his mother, Mrs. Mary E. Rouse on 
Frid&y. 

Mrs. John Martin and Mrs. W. 
M. Markesbery spent Friday "in 
Cincinnati, shopping. 

Mrs. Bessie Osborn has returned 
home after spending several 
months in California with her 
daughter, Mrs. Fred Meadows and 
husband. , 

Mrs. George E. Mearns, of Mays- 
ville, Ky., was called here last 
week on account of the death of 
her aunt, Mrs. Hattie Lucas, of 
Kentaboo Drive. 

Word has been' received by Mr. 
and Mrs. Andy Ward that their 
son Pvt. George C. Ward has ar- 



Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincin- 
nati, after several weeks' illness. 

Mrs. Harold Aylor and children 
spent Saturday 'in Cincinnati, 
shopping- 
Galen Berkshire ; of the U. 8. 
Merchant Marines has arrived 
home for a visit with his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Willis Berkshire, of 
Walton and other relatives in the 
county. 

Dr. 6. W. Gillard and Jim Rice 
are spending a few days in St. Pet- 
ersburg, Fla., on a business trip. 

Mrs. Sadie Tanner spent Wed- 
nesday afternoon with Mrs. Lon- 
nie Tanner of the Dixie Highway. 

The many friends of Mrs. Anna 
Souther regret to learn she is con- 
fined to her room. She is 94 years 
of age and is quite HI. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Aylor enter- 
tained on Sunday with a dinner 
party in compliment of Chas Beall 
and Miss Minnie Baxter. Evening 
guests were Mr. and Mrs. Bill Wat- 
ford. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tanner have 
for their house guests their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Bruce Easterday and little 



BELLE VIEW 

Mrs. Alice Aylor returned home 
last week after a visit with her 
sister at Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Clore 
spent Sunday at the home of their 
mother, Mrs Lute Aylor, of Flor- 
ence. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Hensley spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. H. R. 
Hensley and daughter of Ft 
Thomas. 

Robert Deck, of Covington spent 
Sunday evening with his uncle 
William Deck and family. 

Mrs. Bertha Rice called on Miss 
Annie Cason, Sunday. — — 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ashcraf t and 
daughters spent Sunday in War- 



aad daughters called en Ux, 
Mrs. Franklin Byte and daughter 
on Thursday evening. 

The Sand Run W. M. V. bad a 
fine start for the New Tear. The 
first meeting was held last Thurs- 
day at Mrs. Hazel Eggleston's with 
a large attendance. 

Frances Moore spent Thursday 
night with Margie Ann Kllgour. 

Little Jerry Hamilton is on the 
sick list. 

Boone County Court 
SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE 
OF FRANK GEISLFJt. AND 
— — KATHERINE GEISLER, 
DECEASED 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 PHONE 762 

PHONE ff uR>UNGTok KENTTJC fcY- 

_ PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed :.....' • #2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet *•»«> 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet jj-JV 

32% Dairy Supplement ••••••• *jg 

Big V Laying Mash •• *•*£ 

Growing Mash ;.,- • • • J'Jg 

Broiler Mash iK5 

Turkey Grower .3. 

40% Hog Supplement 

Hog Ration ••••V 

Pig and Slew Ration^... 
55% Meat Scrafp... 
41% Soybean Meal 

Ground Wheat 

Wheat Middlings ... 

Wheat Bran 

Corn Feed Meal -ff 

Hominy Meal ....:.... • *•"" 

Poultry Scratch fjj 

24% Brewery Grain • j-JJ 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet — jz? 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt MJ 

Block Salt v • v -J* 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells *'*° 

• No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



,...■••••■ 



......»« 



•■•••■••••••* 



3.80 
3.70 
3.30 
3.45 
4.35 
3.05 
2.85 
2.75 
2.65 



rived afely in Burma. He is a son, of Oxford, Ohio. 

member of a Military Police unit Friends regret to learn that Ed 

and has been in service more than Newman is on the sick list. 

Ben Anten, who was removed to 



eight months 

Mrs. Hattie Lucas, widow of Jcs. 
Lucas, passed away at her home 
on Kentaboo Drive, after a long ill- 
ness. . 

Sgt. L. E. (Jack) Bair who Is sta- 
tioned in Ft. Bragg, "N. C, has re- 
turned to camp, after spending a 
few days' furlough with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Ward. 

Harry -Baker, of Glencoe, Ky., 
was called here on account of the 
death of his aunt, Mrs. Hattie 
Lucas. 

Mrs. Bill Clifton is recuperating 
at her home on Richwpd Road, 
following an operation W St. Eliz- 
abeth Hospital, recently. Her many 
friends wish for her a speedy e- 
covery. 

Pvt. and Mrs. Harold Utz and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Lilburn 
Buckler spent last Sunday with 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Brown. 

Mrs. Edith Strasinger and chil- 
dren have returned to their home 
in Cold Springs,, after spending a 
week with her sister, Mrs. Ralph 
Orchell and family of Dorotha Ave. 
Cora Laile of Erlanger visited his 
mother Lora Laile and aunt, Mrs. 
Lillie Corbin on Friday evening. 

Mrs. J. A. Belle and two children 
are enjoying a few days' visit with 
her husband Pvt. J. A. Bell. . He is 
a son-in-law of Mr. and Mrs. Andy 
Ward and is stationed at Camp 
Blanding, Fla. 

Friends regret to learn of the 
illness of Robert McCrandle. He 
was removed to the Dillsboro San- 
atorium for treatment, last week. 
Glad to report Miss Margaret 
Aylor, daughter of Mr. and Mr 
Guy Aylor is much improved 



Booth Hospital last week, remains 
quite ill. His many friends regret 
to learn of his illness and wish for 
him a speedy recovery. , 

Mrs. Allen' Utz returned home on 
Sunday after spending a week 
with Mrs. Carrie Surface. ;__ 

Bobby Surface, of Burnside spent 
the week-end with his mother, who 
remains ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Rouse have for 
their guests, their daughter Rosie 
Belle, who resides in Wisconsin 

Misses Mary Katherine and Ruth 



Mrs. Bertha Rice called on Miss 
Annie Cason, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ashcraft and 
daughters spent Sunday in War- 
saw. 

Mrs: Wm. Kruse and family and 
Mrss. Harry Ashcraft and daugh- 
ters were in Covington, Saturday. 

Deepest sympathy is extended to 
Mr. and Mrs. Bab Louden in the 
death of their brother Bob Louden. 

Mrs. Edward Rogers called on 
Mrs. C. E. McNeely, Friday evening. 

Mrs. Allan Rogers and daughter 
and Mrs. Bobby Rogers called on 
Mrs. Harry Ashcraft, Friday even- 
ing. 



The Administrator of the estates 
of Frank Oeisler, and Katherine 
iGelsler, deceased, has filed 
settlement in the Boone 



5, 1M§ (next regular tena ttf 
ty Court). 

C. D. BEffSOK, Clerk, 
Boone County Court 



Boone County Court 
Off TBK ESTATE 
OVA. EL ACRA, DECEASED 

The Administratrix of the estate 
of AM. Aera, 
her settlement In the 
ty Court and any 
exceptions to file to the i 
must do so on or before 
5, W4* (next regular term of Coun- 
ty Court). 

C. D. BKNSCff , Cl erk, 
Boone County Court 



Mrs. W. L. Harrell, of 
county displayed at tbe 
County • homemakers' meeting a variety 
Court and any person having ex-|2« vegetables, all of which 
ceptions to file to the settlements grown. 



MAKE HOME JiEPAinS MOW'. 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



The Sand Run R. A. boys, G. A. 
girls and Sunbeam Band will meet 
Saturday, January 20th, at 2:00 
at their regular meeting place. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kilgour call- 



ed on Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle 
Aylor entertatoed b few friends on on Monday evening. 
Sunday at their home in honor of 



their brother Dulton Aylor. who is 
spending a few days' furlough at 
home. He is „ stationed in Texas. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 




at 



rnUie Sale! 

HAVING DECIDED TO QUIT FARMING I WILL SELL TO 



Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker spent 
Sunday afternoon with Mr. and 
Mrs. William Blaker and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred pitman and 
Mr. and Mrs. John Whitaker, of 
Bullittsville called on Mr. and Mrs. 
William Reitman Sunday evening. 

Several from here attended the 
funeral of Yancey Clore held Tues- 
day afternoon 1 at the Sand Run 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 



Get More 
Out of 



Sat, Jan 




K SGdTT FARM, BETWEEN 
SH, ON 



, 20th 



AT 12:(W (fCkOGtf'CCWT) 



: 

: 



The following described property: Four good milch cows, one 
with 3-week-old calf by side; 2 sets good work harness; collars, 
bridles and check lines; one 2-horse sled; 1 Oliver riding culti- 
vator;; 1 Oliver breaking plow; 1 hillside breaking plow; one 3- 
shovel plow; 2 double shovels; 1 disc harrow; 1 hinge harrow; 
llhprse corn drill; hay forks, blocks and ropes; doubletrees, 
singletrees, log chain ; 1 pair stretchers ; hoes, pitchforks, shovels 
scoop shovels; 1 large water tank; post digger; wire stretchers; 
crosscut saw; 1-man saw; 2 five-gallon cream cans; ;one 2-gal- 
lon cream can; cream separator; water separator; about 60 
shocks fodder; and other articles too numerous to mention. 






TERMS : CASH 



! W. H. DELPH, Owner 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



Don't be handicapped by 
faulty vision. You owe it to 
yourself, and to tho%e de- 
pendent on you, to be at your 
best. 

Good vision and comfort- 
able eyes help you get more 
out of life. Proper glasses, if 
needed, will help you save 
your eyesight for future 
years. Don't take chances. 
Let us examine your eyes. 



LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 

COVINGTON 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

■ 

6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 
AHt CONDITIONED 




Service 



w ■ 



AVAILABLE WITHOUT DELAY 



If you need roof repairs, or an entirely new roof, 
there is no government regulation that willf delay 
the work. Wa have available ample stock of CAREY 
Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of prompt 
and the biggest roof value., to be had anywhere. 
Call us, or come in about your roofing needs. We 
handle all details. No red tape. 

*Buy WAR BONDS 
mi STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

„ 819 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 



*.!.# 



STANDARO FOR OVER 60 TEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



2 Kr> 




PUBLIC 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiii 

New James 

Theatre 

NEW SHOW TIME" 

One Show Each Night at 7:30 CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 2:30 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday ft Thurs. 



Russell Hayden, Jennifer Holt in 

FRONTIER LAW 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18TH 



IN ORDER TO SETTLE THE ESTATE OF THE LATE TOM R. 
ROSS, 1. WILL OFFER FOR SALE AT HIS FARM LOCATED 
2 MILES FROM BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH, ON UNION- 
LANDING ROAD ON 



Charlie McCarthy, Edgar Bergen in 

SONG OF THE OPEN 
ROAD 

FRI. ft SAT., JANUARY 19 and 20 



George Raft, Joan Bennett in 

THE HOUSE 
ACROSS THE BAY 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21ST 



Edmund Lowe, Janis Carter, in 

THE GIRL IN THE 
CASE 

MONDAY, JANUARY 22ND 



• 



AT 1:00 P.M. (CWT) 



I 



NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 23RD 



>• 



Harriet Milliard, Jack Haley, in 

TAKE IT BIG 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24 

.IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



The following: Two Jersey cows, 3 and 5 years old; 2 yearling 
heifers; 14 sheep; 1 bay mare; 1 white horse; 3 sets of harness; 
2 collars; 3 bridles; hinge harrow; scraper; truck wagon; sled, 
new; mowing machine; cutoff saw; rake; 2 rouble shovel 
plows; laying off plow; hillside plow; two-horse jumper; left- 
handed turning plow; one-horse drill; disc harrow; doubletrees 
and singletrees; 2 hand tobacco setters; hoes; forks; some hog 
meat and many other articles too numerous to mention. Also 
some household and kitchen articles of Maude Ross, some of 
which are antiques. ^ 

TERMS: CASH 

John E. Crigler , Adm 

OP THE T. B. ROSS ESTATE 
LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



<n 



THURSDAY, JANUARY IS, 



IBB BOOMS OOUJNTI RECORDER, BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



I' 



BUS BONE 



Mr. and lira. Tom Hamilton re- 
ceived a telephone message that 
flietr daughter, Mrs. Klva Mae Ryle 
was 111. 

Russell Miller, Jr., Is at Carroll- 
ton with a load of tobacco. 

Mrs. Garfield Hamilton and 
daughter Betty Joyce spent Friday 
evening with Mrs. H. E. Miller. 

Mrs. Miller is much Improved at 
this writing. 

Wanda Lee Miller called on Betty 
Joyce Hamilton, Sunday afternoon. 

Elva Williamson called on Mrs. 
Miller on Monday morning. =*?* 

Charlie Miller and family. Mr. 



and Mrs. Young and bottle Young 
called on the Millers at Big Bone, 
Sunday. 

Sorry to hear of the death of 
John Ewbanks. This writer sym- 
pathises with Mrs. Katie Ewbank 
and son. 

It was reported here that Ward 
Rice, of Walton had been wounded. 



FLORENCE HOMEMAKERS 



The January meeting of ' flfe 
Florence Homemakers will be held 
on Friday, January 19th at iorSfr 
a. m. at the Town Hall. V ' 
rcf Mabel G. Sayre, Reporter. 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 



Several boys from. .this commu- 
nity were examined for the armed 
service this week. • ^ w- 

Frank Sebree and wife were In 
Union, Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ogden were in 
Union, Friday afternoon. 

Mrs. Grace Feldhaua is expect- 
ing her son Bluford home in the 
near future. He has been in the 
army for four years. 

Schwenke's hauled their tobacco 
to Car roll ton. 

-Mr. and Mrs. Harold Love spent 
Sunday with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. H. Sebree. 



RIVER VIEW 



Those on the sick list are slowly 
Improving. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Moore, Jr., 
and baby spent Sunday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Step- 
hens. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Craig, of 
Covington spent Sunday with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Craig. 

Frank Green called on Henry 



Black, Friday. 

W. B. Stephens called on Mr. 
and -Mrs. La vine Stephens and son 
Sfftfaf afternoon. 

TO*.* Hazel Smith spent one day 
recently with her sister, Mrs. 
Henry Black and husband. 

Due to the heavy ice on the 
roads school was closed for sev- 
eral days. * 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hodges visited 
their daughter, Mrs. Russell Finn, 



= 



Jr., and husband over the week- IFOR SALE— Alfalfa and red clov 






•'f-J 



- 



J-, ,— ^- 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUCTION AT 
THE FARM LOCATED ON UftlON-HATHWAY ROAD, ON 



MON.. 



SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Deliver — Phone 74 



BURUNGTON, 

===== 



KENTUCKY 



- 



KALE 2 lbs. 25c 

CORN MEAL 5 lbs. 25c 

APPLES, Cooking or Eating . . . ; ,.....' .... .per lb. 10c 

GRAPEFRUIT, large plMk meat ea. 10c 

ORANGES, large I per doz. 40c 

CELERY, large stalk , t l k 17c 

YAMS . . .! , g lbs. 15c 

ENGLISH WALNUTS, diamond brand lb. 40c 

MINCE MEAT 1% lb. jar. 49c 

WILSONS MILK, large can IW pt. 10c 

NU MAID lb 2 points 20c 

BISQUICK ig. pkj. 33<s 

AUNT JANES CHERRY PRESERVES *. . . Jar 30c 

APPLE BUTTER 2 lb. 6 oa. 25c 

NEW CABBAGE «« lb. 8c 

BREAKFAST BACON, per lb 4 points 35c 

FRANKS, per lb. ; 3 points 32c 

I2HJSII' fUked £*"». E 

HOMINY, Grain, per lb. 7c 



end 

Mrs. Buddy Finn spent one day 
last week with Mrs. Chas. Black 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Black and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs 
Henry Black, Friday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Woods, of 
Aurora, Ind., spent the week-end 
with her parents, Mr. and. Mrs 
Thad Ryle. 

Mrs. Emma Cr jig 'called on her 
mother, Mrs. Anna Ryle one day 
last week. We are glad Mrs. Ryle 
is Mconvaleeoing at her home, after 
* recent illness. 

We are- sorry that Mrs. Berta 
Rector has been on Che sick list. 
We pray for her a speedy recovery. 

Charley and Henry Black made 
a business trip to Union, Monday. 

W. J. Craig called on Henry 
Black, Sunday morning. 
K 

NOTICE 



er baled hay. Paul Neal, Verona, 
Ky., R. 2. t u-p 



DAIRY COWS— 20 head of heavy 
producing Wisconsin dairy cows, 
6 Holstein, 8 Brown Swiss and 6 
Guernseys; also 4 large Brown 
Swiss heifers; all T. B. and Bang 
tested. Illinois hones and mules. 
All stock guaranteed. A week's 
trial given. Easy payments can 

<■■ be arranged. Hog feed, $1.85 per 
100 pounds. GENERAL D7* 1 - 

. TRIBUTORS, SO E. Second 
Covington, Ky. Open Sunday. 

TOR SALE— Writing desk, libr 
table, Victrola; also 20 laying 
hens. Ernest Allen, Burlington, 

R. 2. Tel. 469. lt-c 



WANTED— Man and wife to oper- 
ate farm on East Bend road. 
Mary E. Casey, Burlington, Ken- 
tucky. 30-2-p 



All women that have been mak- 
ing Red Cross kits for soldiers,' 
please turn them in as I soon as 
possible. 

Mrs. Joseph Huey, County 
Production Chairman, A. R. O 



SALE BEGINNING AT 1:00 P. M. SHARP 

LIVE STOCK— Two horses, 1 coming 6 years old; 1 filly coming 6 years; h 
aged mare mule; 5 milch cows, 2 will freshen in 30 days, 3 are milking now. 

FARMING TOOLS— 1 farm wagon? (Weber) with sideboards, will hold 30 
bu. corn; 1 hay wagon; 1 electric fence controller, complete with battery; 
one 2-horse sled; 1 hay rake; 1 E harrow; turning plow with joiner; 1 
hillside plow, 1 good as new; 1 Rastus cultivator; 1 Dixie plow; 1 double 
shovel plow; 1 double harpoon hay fork; 1 lot of hay rope and pulleys; 60- 
tooth harrow; 1 -horse sled; riding cultivator; pitchforks, hoes, crosscut saw, 
axe, matock and small tools; 1 steel frame saw rig with 30-in. saw; two 30- 
gallon lard kettles; 1 scalding box: 1 Enterprise lard press and sausage 
stufferr3 sets of work harness; collars and brides; 1 leather halter; 7 cow 
chains; 1 good log chain; four 50-gallon rain barrels; Z tons of lespedeza 
hay; 3 tons of clover and redtop mixed hay; one 14-gal. cap. water separ- 
ator, same as new; one 10-gal. water separator; two 5-gal. milk cans. 

ALSO SOME HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT— Including a 5-burner coal oil 
ranere norcelain finish with hnilt.in nunn- i •m^j «n „,u;*„ i,u»i. n - _lj..««: 



one 48-in. steel bed with coil springs. 



TERMS: CASH . 

HOWARD CLEGB, OWNER 

. i ew 



|lllll!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||lllllli 

I BOONE CO. FARMS T 



CARD OF THANKS 



We wish to express our sincere 
appreciation and gratitude for 
every act of kindness and sym- 
pathy shown us during the illness 
and death of our father 

Yancey Clore * 

We also wish to thank Rev. L. 
M. Hamilton for his consoling 
words; Dr. Nunnelley for his un- 
tiring efforts; the choir for their 
beautiful songs; the. donors of the 
floral pieces; and Chambers and 
Grubbs for the efficient manner In 
which they conducted the funeral 
The Family 



FOR SALE— Stayman Winesap 
apples. , Bring basket. Wm. H. 
Moore, Hebron, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
115. 30-3t-c 



FOR RENT— Lovely three-large- 
room flat, one block from stores, 
busses; quiet; front entrance, 
private porch; half hour from 
Covington; large grounds, excep- 
tional view; high and dry; elec- 
tricity. Miss Knuwener, Union, 
Ky. ^ it-c 



FOR SALE— Two bird dogs, point- 
ers. Mrs. S. B. Faulkner, Hebron, 
Ky. Tel. 175. 30-St-c. 



FOR SALE— Hybrid corn, U. 8. IS. 
F. J. Hammersmith, V* mile from 
Florence on U. 8. 42. Tel. Flor- 
ence 342. 29-2t-c 



* 



COL. LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



10Q ACRES— 7-room house, 2 barns, electric. The tobacco crop : 

this year sold for over $2000.00 $6000.00 = 

259 ACRES— 2 houses, 2 barns, 11.8 acres tobacco base. Over = 
$11,000.00 worth of tobacco sold in two years and this EE 
year's crop yet to go $13,000.00 • 

130 ACRES— On Ohio River, 3.2 acres tobacco base, 6-room == 
house, 3-room house, 3 barns, silo, stock, team and =■ 
tools, tractor, and feed .; $11,000.00 «= 

142 ACRES— Ohio River, all bottom land of best quality; 5- I 
room house, basement, furnace, bath; 2 large barns, = 
large crib $21,000.00 =S 

50 ACRES— iy 2 miles from Burlington on blacktop road; barn; E= 
no house $3500.00 9 

132 ACRES— 1 mile from Burlington, about 20 acres in good = 

bearing apple orchard." All level tractor land; 5-room = 

house, electric, 2 good barns. Well fenced; 2 ponds. =5 

In one family over 100 years $13,000.00 == 

131 ACRES— West of Union, 3.8 acres tobacco base; 3-room : 

house, electric, large dairy barn .*. $6850.00 == 

= 138 ACRB8rr-9-room house, 3-room new tenant house, electric. = 
== 2 barns, 21 sheep $9000.00" 5= 

SJ 150*4 ACRES— West of Union, 5 acres tobacco base; 6-room I 

house, 3-room tenant house, dairy and tobacco barn; =5 
stanchions for 16 cows; other buildings $8000.00 ; 

pj 174 ACRES — 3 acres tobacco base; not a good location; old | 
house; well watered, good land .$4500.00 § 

All of these farms can be financed. E 



A. B. RENAKER 



NOTICE /~\ 

L/£cker Blanl 



The Frozen Food 
at Burlington will be In operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are Interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



== TEL. OFFICE 12 



BURLINGTON, KY. 
G. SMITH, 83 



RES. 55 = 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 






1&% 




HANDLE EM WITH 







• 



After Three War Years, Your Electric Appliance* 
Need Continued Good Care To Make 'Em Last 






Of I motors regularly according to manu- 
facturers' directions. (Some motors are en- 
closed in hermetically sealed units and need 
ad oiling.) 

Koap appliances clean. Wipe carefully 
after each, using. Dirt, dust, food, crumbs, 
can cause trouble. 

Tighten nuts, bolts and screws at the first 
sign of looseness. 

Watch out for loose connections. If ap- 
pliance sparks or motor stalls, disconnect 
instantly and have checked. 



Never immerse an appliance in water. St 
may result in a short circuit, damaged ap- 
pliance or both. . 

Don't drop appliances and don't knock 
them around. Treat them with care. 

Don't tinker. Unless you know exactly 
what you're doing, have an expert service- 
man handle your repairs. 

■ ; 4 . :_ -J LJ — — 

Treat cords carefully. Don't kink, knot 
*^or allow to rub On sharp edges. Keep away 
from oil, moisture, hot appliances. Don't 
yank to disconnect. 



Call at Our Office for Suggestions on the Care and Use of Specific Appliances, 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



fc 



■"•="■ 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Tom B. Roas, de- 
ceased, are requested to present 
same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons Indebted to the 
said estate are requested to call 
and settle with the undersigned. 
John E. Crigler, 
29-2t-c Administrator. 



FARMS for SALE 

BOONE COUNTY 

SOLD— You are too late for 2 
farms, M. M. Lucas farm, Bul- 
littsvllle, 70 acres; L. E. Conrad 
farm, Williamstown. 83 acres. 

YOU ARE ON TIME for the cheap- 
est Farms in Boone County. 

174 ACRES near Big Bone Church 
bid house, no barn; richest land 
the crows fly over. $4500. 

155 ACRES near Burlington; 4- 
room house; 3 barns. Vacant. 
$9,000.00. 

200 ACRE dairy farm, $50 per acre. 

23 ACRES near Airport; bldgs. 
$3700. 

16% ACRES Burlington pike, fac- 
ing on two roads; nice level land 
fenced; large lake. $3000.00. 

KENTON CQUNTY 

Independence Special 

10 ACRES; nice 6-room modern 
home. Vacant. Don't be too late. 
NICHOLSON— 74 acres $7000. 
135 ACRES— Rich land $720*. 
69 ACRES— Visalia. $3500F 
100 ACRES— Stock and dairy. $10,- 
000. 
62 ACRES— Good buildings $7800. 
85 ACRES— Near Independence. 

$9000. 
77 ACRES— On 3 L; riice brick 
home, dairy barn. 

Call or Write for New List 

RELC. WAYMAN 

Office: 638 Washington St. 

Covington. Phone HE. ' 5197 

Ind. 5084 



FOR SALE— Sow and 8 pigs. Robt. 
Woodward, Erlanger, Ky., R. 
*• 29-2t-c. 



WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY TO- 
BACCO SEED at Gulley and 
Pettifs, Burlington; B. F. Elliott, 
Walton; Walter Renaker, Verona 
or by mall. $1.50 per os, 75c per 
% oz. Clay Bedford, Cynthlana, 
Ky. 29-4t-c 



FOR SALE— Soybean hay. Floyd 
Campbell, between Aurora and 
Lawrenceburg, Lawrenceburg, In- 
diana, R. 1. 29-2-p 



FOR SALE— Electric water pump 
in good condition. $50.00. Call 
Dixie 7208-M. 29-2t-p 



FOR SALE— 3-burner oil stove and 
Hoosler kitchen cabinet. Mrs. 
Orchelle, Dorothy Avenue, Flor- 
ence, Ky. 29-2-c 



Boone Circuit Court 
No. 42421 
C. Liston Hemp-fling, Admr. of 

the Estate of John McCartney, 

Dec'd., Plaintiff 

NOTICE OF CREDITORS 
The Unknown Lineal Descendants 

and Heirs at Law of Jol 

McCartney, Dec'd. Defendants 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of JohrV McCartney, 
deceased, are hereby notified/and 
required to present the same, prov- 
en as required by law, to the un- 
dersigned Commissioner, at his of- 
fice, in the Court House in Bur- 
lington, Boone County, Kentucky, 
on or before the 5th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1945 and all claims not so 
proven and presented on or before J 
said date shall be forever barred. I _ 

Given under my hand as Mast- . WANTED-,Man and wife to work 



FOR SALE— Two purebred O. L C. 
sows, with. pigs; also 1 young 
cow. B. H. Blair, at Cablndale, 
Dixie Highway, Florence, Ky., R. 
D. • 29-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Heatrola. Calvin Cress, 
Burlington, Ky. Tel. 79. 29-2t-p 



WANTED— Farmer, married couple 
must know tobacco; excellent 
working conditions; good pay. 
Millridge Stock Farm, Big Bone 
Road. Waner G. Miller, Jr. 28-tf 



er Commissioner of the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court, this January 10th, 1945. 

A. D. YELTON, 
30-3t-c Master Commissioner 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIR* at reasonable 
rates. Colonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St. tf 



FOR SALE— Two trucks, one 1938 
model and one 1939 model, both 
in good condition, with good 
tires. Robert Eades, Florence, 
Ky. Tel. Flor. 23. 29-2-c 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road. This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf. 



FOR SALE— Fresh Jersey cow five 
years old, heifer calf. D. H. 
Norrls. Tel. Burl. 272. lt-p 



ATTENTION Monument purchasers 
please see me ^before -you pur- 
chase a monument or marker. I 
expect to visit Burlington, Ky., 
every first Monday, that I pos- 
sibly can. If interested call or 
write W. H. Florence, 727 Scott 
Street, Covington, Ky. It^p 

FOR RENT— A large well equipped 
dairy farm for rent. Complete 
equipment. A good man well 
recommended will be given a 
splendid opportunity. Northway 
Farm, Burlington pike, 2 miles 
from Florence, Ky. Fo» informa- 
tion call Dr. Joe Northcutt, HE. 
1216. , lt-c. 



on farm m Idlewlld section of 
Boone County. AH equipment 
furnished. Nice 3-room house. 
Phone E. J. Shannon, JEfferson 
2646, CincinpaTtsor get in touch , 
with Tom { Clifford now on 
farm. \ 28-3t-c 



FOR WELL miLLING— Call or 
write HubertSFarrls, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Workx guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 

FOR RENT— 150-acre fbm^near 
Big Bone Baptist Church; 5-acre 
tobacco base. Orin Edwards, 
Union, Ky., R. 1. 27-4t-p 



FOR SALE— 200 tons of good clover 
or timothy or mixed hay. Price 
$35.00 per ton FOB your station; 
alfalfa $42.00. Harry Ball, Fair- 
field, Iowa. 27-4t-p 



HAULING— Specializing in live- 
stock. Call Dixie 7698, ask for 
Carl. js-tf 



WANTED— Tenant to 'tend 115 
acres, good land, Boone County; 
Plenty water. Must have team, 
tools and sufficient help to raise 
4y 2 acres of tobacco, 15 acres corn 
15 acres hay; milk cows optional. 

, E. Scherf, 860 Dixie Highway, Er- 
langer, Ky. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE — Home Comfort range; 
2 linoleum rugs, 9x12. R. E. Tan- 
ner, Florence, Ky. Tel. Folrence 
804. . jt-c 



FOR SALE— 160-acre farm; new 4- 
room house, electric; other good 
buildings; 1 mile from U. S. 25 
on the Mt. Zlon-Unien Road 
Boone County. Otis P. Blddle. lp 



INCREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. PuUorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. Sired matlngs. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm 
on shares. Tenant to furnish 
work stock and tools. Reference 
required. J. H. Huey, Petersburg, 
Ky. Tel. Burl. 238. 44-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servtelng 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington COlonlal 1121. tf. 



AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT 
—■UY NOW 

Special This Week on 

SPRING FILL ED L IVING 
ROOM SUITES 



flta 



Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison, Cot. HE. .273 
MORE FOR TOUR MONEY 



/ 



_ 



— _ 



■M 




the Boone Co 




Recorder 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



— — 



VOLUME M 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY thtosdai, January jk, imj 







**+• 



NEED FOR LOCKER 
100 MORE SIGNERS 



APPROXIMATELY EIGHTY CON- 
TRACTS IN HANDS OF COM- 
MTRBE— TOTAL NEEDED IS 
ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY. 



"V 



One hundred food producers to 
sign-up lor one year's rental are 
needed tor the northern half of 
Boone County to secure locker— 
freezer service. Approximately 
eighty food producers have signed 
-up to date. Due to the bad weath- 
er and roads, the sign-up date has 
been extended. 

Locker f reeser plants bring a new 
type of food service to the commu- 
nity. This service has proven a 
great forward step in making more 
efficient uses of farm grown food 
crops and product*. They have 
given the farm family an oppor- 
tunity to enjoy a better and more 
wholesome year round diet, accord- 
ing to H. R. Ftorkner, County Agent. 
Practically all rural people qualify 
as food producers and count to- 
ward the necessary 180 food pro- 
ducer rental applications. 

Many folks are signing up for a 
year's locker rental Just to get the 
new food service started. The his- 
tory however, shows that once the 
service is started, all rentals are 
quickly sold out and a large wait- 
ing list is on file. 

Those who want locker-freezer 
service or want to cooperate in se- 
curing this service locally should 
sign up now. Those who sign up 
now are rendering a valuable ser- 
vice toward getting this service 
started at the earliest possible 
date. Those who wait are delay- 
ing the~datSLthis service can be 
made availably. 

Application forms printed in this 
week's paper/ may be used. Act 
now. Contribute your help toward 
this worthwhile service. 

Walton And New Haven 

Teems Chalk Up Wins 



I Number Of Local 

Women Donate Time 
At PL Thomas Hospital 

Following Is a list of the names, 
and the number of hours worked, 
by those who represent Boone 
County in December at the Army 
Air force Convalescent Hospital, Ft. 
Thomas thru the medium of Red 
Cross. These women deserve spec- 
ial credit owing to the extra bad 
weather conditions: 



COMPLETE DETAILS 
OF PLANE CRASH 



GIVEN BY 8F4MNGFIELD LEAD- 
ER AND PRESS IN FATAL AC- 
CIDENT WHICH TOOK LIFE OF 
GEORGE B. YATES, JR. 



The following news story was 
j taken from the Springfield Leader 
Mrs. Olivia. Doiph, Petersburg, 24;, and Press, concerning the fatal 
Mrs R. d. Garrison, Burlington, 24; crash of an airplane which claim-. 
Mrs Helen Snyder, Burlington, 18: 1 ed the lives of George B. Yates, 



Mrs. Garnet Tolih, Burlington 16; 
Mrs. William Fitzgerald, Florence 9; 
Miss Alice Anderson, Florence, 8; 
Miss Marian Bradford, Florence 6; 
Mrs. Katherine Cropper, Burling- 
ton, 8; Miss Sue Sayre, Florence 6; 
Miss Mary Bess Cropper, Burling- 
ton, 3; Miss Billye Wilson, Hebron, 
3; making a total of 123 hours for 
the month of December. A similar 
list will be posted each month, and 
anyone wishing to volunteer may 
call or write Mrs. Elizabeth Good- 
ridge Nestor, Florence, Ky. Tel. 
Florence 84. 



Walton and New Haven each 
chalked up a victory in games last 
week over Simon Kenton and War 
saw, respectively.. 

Walton exhibited a final burst 
of speed in the fourth quarter to 
down the Simon Kenton Pioneers 
on the Walton floor by a 37-32 

count. ". " 

Wynn, of the Walton five collect- 
ed 13 points, while Roberts collect- 
ed 10 and Cook nine. High point 
man for Simon Kenton was Feuch 
with 12 points. ' 

In a preliminary game Simon 
Kenton reserves emerged victori- 
ous over Walton reserves by a 26-8 

count. 

New Haven trounced the Warsaw 
five Tuesday night by a score of 
31-29 after trailing at the half- 
way mark. Judge was high point 
man for the winners with 14 points 
while Bogardus collected 13 for the 

losers. • ^> „ 

In a preliminary game the New 
Haven reserves were victorious 
over Warsaw by a 33-23 count. 

—————————— 

Purple Heart Awarded 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Johnson, of 
Walton received the Purple Heart 
awarded posthumously to their 
son, Pfc. Paul Harold Johnson of 
the* U. S. Marine Corps, who was 
killed on the Palau islands Sept. 
16th. 



TAX COLLECTOR 
WILL VISIT COUNTY 



WILL ASSIST TAXPAYERS IN 
«s FILING FINAL 1944 RETURNS 
AND ESTIMATED RETURNS 
FOR THE YEAR 1945. 



Collector of Internal Revenue, S. 
•R. Glenn, announces that a deputy 
from his office will visit Burling- 
ton, Ky., March 1 through March 3 
1945, for the purpose of assisting 
taxpayers in filing their final 1944 
returns and their estimated returns 
for the year 1945. Their returns 
should be filed by March 15, 1945. 

Mr. Glenn says that the new 
Revenue Aqt Is In many particul- 
ars different from the laws previ- 
ously to effect and that the many 
changes made can not be explain- 
ed in a short notice, but that his 
deputy Is familiar with the laws 
and is being sent here to be of 
real service • to the taxpaylng 
public. The service is absolutely 
free. Collector Glenn urges the 
taxpayers of this county to see the 
deputy and let him help them with 
their income tax problems. 



Mrs. L. R. Erickson 

Mrs. L. R. Erickson, a former res- 
ident of Boone County, passed 
away Thursday of last week at her 
home In San Jose, Calif., accord- 
ing to an announcement received 
here. She was 58 and had been 
111 only five months. 

She was born 4nd reared In 
Boone County, but had been resid- 
ing In California for the past 15 
years. , 

Besides her husband she leaves 
two sons, Wilford and Franklin 
Beemon, both in the armed ser- 
vices; one daughter Frances Bee- 
mon; two sistfers, Mrs. Nora Sa- 
tires and Mrs. Fannie Hage, both 
of California and two brothers 
John W. Ryle, of Burlington and 
Joseph Ryle, of Virginia. 

She was the third of this family 
to depart this life in the past few 
months. ""Two brothers, Dr. Elijah 
Ryle of Walton ana J. P. Ryle, of 
Burlington, both passing away 
only a short time ago. 

Details concerning the funeral 
arrangements were not made 
known in the telegram received by 
the family. 



Jr., and William Burdick 

The tiny red and silver training 
plane climbed slowly from a field 
southeast of Springfield after sim- 
ulating a forced landing for a 
student yesterday afternoon. 

The little 65 horsepower engine 
sputtered, quit a moment, started 
again, then stopped entirely. The 
ship was low and the field behind 
it, but the pilot attempted a steep 
turn back— for ahead was a heavi- 
ly wooded section. 

But the turn was too steep. The 
plane hesitated, slipped over on a 
wing, and slid sideways Into the 
woods. The right wing, strong 
enough to sustain two men In 
flight, wasn't built for smashing 
into heavy trees. It buckled, and 
ripped into shreds. 

The plane crashed to the earth, 
slightly nose first, throwing the 
pilot forward against the wind- 
shield and Instrument panel. 
This, possibly Is what happen- 
ed before farmers pulled the 
lifeless body of Instructor George 
B. Yates, Jr., from the ship and* 
freed the unconscious student, 
William Franklin Burdick, from 
his safety belt. 

Dies In Hospital 
What really happened-^what ac- 
tually caused the little ship to 
crash— probably will forever remain 
a mystery. 

Burdick .the only man who could 
shecrany light on the crash, died 



had a commercial license and an 
instructor's rating/*] / 

Taugnt «♦ Drury 

In addition to knowing the prac- 
tical side of flying, Yates also had 
a background In the theory of 
flight, having taught physics at 
Drury college from June, 1941 until 
June 1944. He also taught ground 
school— preparing student pilots 
for the private pilot's written ex- 
amination. 

Yates had conducted two such 
schools for students of the Spring- 
field Flying Service and had Just 
finished conducting a course on 
his own. He had planned to con- 
duct a review course last night. 
Wife Also a Filer 

Yates, who was m years old, is 
survived by his wile, Mary, who 
taught physical education at Drury 
for two years and has 25 to 30 
hours In the air heraelf . In addi- 
tion he is survived by his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. George B. Yates, Sr., 
of Burlington, Ky., and a sister, 
Miss Mary Yates, who is with .the 
WAVES in San Francisco. 

Those from a distance attending 
the funeral were: Mary Margaret 
Yates, of San Francisco, Calif.; 
Mrs. R. P. Smith, Herbert Hyde, 
Mrs. Dorothy Minto, all of Spring- 
field, Mo.; Mrs. Ernest Flowers, 
Miss Ellazbeth Flowers, of Colum- 
bia, Ky.; Miss Frances Waggener, 
Paul Waggener, of Louisville; Rev. 
Leo Drake and wife, "of Newport; 
Rev. Roy Evans and wife, of Gos- 
port, Ind.; and Marvin Moore, Aer. 
Ml/c, who is with the U. S, Navy 
Of Cuba, HI. 



FARMERS PLAN 
IMPROVEMENT 

PROGRAM FOR (COUNTS— FARM 
PRACTICES FOR 1945 ABC REC- 
OMMENDED— ALL PHASES TO 
BE COVERED. 



Alonzo Oder 



Egg Goal Incr 



easef >^ 



The national 1945 egg production 
goal has been Increased gy about 
eleven percent, accdrdlng to word 
received this week by Mark Cook, 
Chairman of the Boone County 
Agricultural Conservation Associa- 
tion Committee. The revised figure 
of 4,350 million dozen is only about 
seven percent less than the estim- 
ated 1944 production and is based 



137 Boone County Men 
Take Pre-tadnctieo 




Wed. 



at 3:45 o'clock this morning in 8t.jon additional needs which have 



Furteral services were held at 
2:30 p. m. Saturday at the Philip 
Taliaferro funeral home, Erlanger, 
for Alonzo Oder, 69, of 143 Kenton 
Street, Elsmere, a building con- 
tractor who died Thursday at Booth 
Hospital, Covington, after a short 
illness. Rev. W. H. Lodwlck, pastor 
of Elsmere Baptist Church officiate 
ed at the services. ^Burial was 
the Florence Cemetery. 

Mr. Oder was a member of the 
Elsmere Baptist Church and had 
been a resident of Elsmere for the 
past 40 years. 

He Is survived by seven daugh- 
ters, Mrs. Miller Kleine, Cincin- 
nati, and Mrs. Charles White, 
Mrs. Gordon Jennings, wife of 
Kenton County sheriff; Mrs. Cletn 
Stallo, Mrs. Clifford Hlghhouse, 
Mrs. Earl Tanner and Miss Lucy 
Mae Oder, all of Elsmere: a son, 
William E. Oder, Erlanger; a sis- 
ter, Mrs. Josie McAllister, Cali- 
fornia; five grandchildren and a 
niece, Mrs. E. C. Hall, Elsmere. 

Phil Taliaferro, Erlanger funeral 
director was in charge of arrange- 
ments. 



Miss Mamie McMullen 



Funeral services for Miss Mamie 
McMullen were held at 2:00 p. m. 
Monday at the Tharp & Stlth fu- 
neral home. Miss McMullen, who 

as 58, died Saturday at Booth 
Hospital, Covington. Burial was in 
Burlington Cemetery. 

She was a lifelong resident of 
Boone County and a member of the 
Gunpowder Baptist Church. J 

She is survived by two brothers 
C. H. and L. W. McMullen, both of 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

Tharp and Stithy Florence fu- 
neral directors were in charge of 
arrangements. 

Former Boone Countian 
Killed In France Jan. 10 



Cpl. Walter Snow, was killed in 
action while fighting with a tank 
outfit in France on January 10, ac- 
cording to an announcement re- 
ceived here this week. 

He had been overseas but a short 
time. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben Snow, formerly of Boone Coun- 
ty, but now reside in Covington. 



John's hospital, where he was tak- 
en yesterday afternoon with two 
leg fractures and a head Injury 

At the scene yesterday afternoon 
immediately-after the crash occur- 
red at about 3:40, fanners cut the 
useless parachute from Burdick, 
and removed his tie and loosened 
his clothing until two ambulances 
arrived. 

A Spin Unlikely 
Pilots at the airport today were 
speculating over what caused the 
tragedy, realizing that George 
Yates was a skilled and^ -careful 
pilot. 

Besides the theory that their 
plane slipped out of a tight turn 
near the ground, there are two 
other possibilities. 

Both were wearing parachutes 
and had announced their Inton- 
ation before taking off of practic- 
"ing spins. The crash occurred in 
one^of the customary spin areas. 
So they may have spun in. 

But the way the plane struck the 
ground doesn't seems to indicate a 
spin accident. And spins are per- 
formed at high altitudes— 1500 feet 
Is the CAA minimum for finishing 
such a maneuver. So they would 
have had a chance,, it seems, to 
use their parachutes had some- 
thing happened in a spin. 

Number two possibility: They 
may have been making an actual 
forced landing and miscalculated. 
Although It is evident they were 
having motor trouble, they ob- 
vious weren't planning to make a 
landing in the woods. And pilots 
make forced landings with the ship 
slowed down as much as possible. 
The wreckage shows clearly that 
the plane was going pretty fast 
when it hit— much faster than the 
<4 usual speed for a forced landing. 
Experts Checking 
Experts from the Civil Aero- 
nautics Authority are here today 
examining the accident scene and 
wreckage. But If they do arrive at 
at a conclusion as to the, cause of 
the crash, their report probably will 
hot be made public. 

Coroner Murray C. Stone,, who 
pointed out he is not a "plane 
expert," said he plans no further 
Investigation and that no inquest 
will be held. ' 

Cause of Yates' death, said Doc- 
tor stone, was a brushed chest, 
but .the instructor also suffered 
severe head lacerations, two leg 
fractures and an arm fracture. 
Neighboring farmers reported 
that the plane had been flying 
low over clear fields near the* 
woods. (Indicating they had been 
practicing forced landings, be- 
cause the farmers said the motor 
would- be cut off and on-) OnC 
farmer said the plane was climb- 
ing when the motor stopped 
twice. The second time, he said. 
It turned and seemed to fall side- 
ways into the woods. 
Yates had several hundred hours 
in the air and owned the Porter- 
field in which he was killed. He 



developed since the. first figure was 
announced hi NovemlSer Of 184*. 



Baby chicks for flock replace- 
ments, especially early hatched 
chicks, should be about the same 
for the nation as a whole as last 
last year, according to recent in- 
formation, Mr. Cook, added. 



1945 PROGRAM 
IS APPROVED 



BY UTOPIA CLUB MEMBERS AT 
MEETING HELD IN BURLING- 
TON, THURSDAY, JANUARY 

28TH. 



Boone County Utopia Club mem- 
bers In their regular meeting at 
Burlington last Thursday evening, 
January 18th, approved goals and 
a meeting program for 1945 accord- 
ing to Grant Maddox, president. 
The general program set up and 
goals are as follows: 

Special goals in 1945:. 

L The development of rural 
leadership through active particip- 
ation in all local Agricultural am 
Home Economics work. 

2. The bringing of_ older high 
school youth into the organiza 
tlon. „ - ' . . 

3. Hold a strong organization so 



that the club may go forward after 
the war. ' 

4. Help develop a greater appre- 
ciation of all older youth in rural 
life regardless- of future profes- 
sions. 

5. Make a special effort to de- 
velop capable adult leadership 
strongly needed In both 4-H Club 
work and adult work. 

The Utopia Club members will 
also plan to: 

1. Carry one or mose projects of 
their special choosing along ap- 
proved Agricultural or Home Ec- 
onomics work. 

2. Assist where possible in carry- 
ing out new trials or demonstra- 
tions on a limited scale. This work 
might be called pioneering in im- 
proved Agriculture and Home Ec- 
onomics. 

The Utopia Club meeting pro- 
grams are planned as follows: 

1. The meeting programs wUl be 
divided as follows: (a) Special 
group discussions, first thirty min- 
utes; (b) General business meet- 
ing; (c) Guest speakers; (d) Rec- 
reation. 

The meeting dates will be Janu- 
ary 18h, February 22nd, March 22, 
April 17th, May 24th, June 21st, 
July 19th, August 16th, September 
20th, October 25th, November 22d. 
and December 20th. 

James Franklin Brown,* of Flor- 
ence was enrolled as a new mem- 
ber at the January meeting. 



Boone County fanners to a series 
of community meetings are plan- 
ning one of the most progressive 
improvement programs undertaken 
in recent years, according to H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent. The pro- 
grams deal principally with fact- 
ors based on • land built up with 
sound crops and livestock improve- 
ment plans, many of which will be 
completed in 1945 and others that 
involve completion over a longer 
period. 

A summary of five community 
programs planned to date show that 
local farm leaders .are recommend- 
ing the following practices for 1945: 

Soils: 1. Commercial fertilizers 
including limes and phosphate are 
basic for soil Improvement. High 
price crops return a higher net 
profit today than ever before. 

Farmers are urged to: 1. Order 
and secure delivery of their 1946 
fertilizers now as the total supply 
is limited and later delivery can 
not be expected when needed. 2. 
Make full uses of all available AAA 
phosphate and lime grant-of-aid 
materials; where early delivery of 
these cannot be expected, order Im- 
mediately from local dealer. I. More 
efficient uses of manures and to- 
bacco stalks. 4. Full uses of ero- 
sion control practices including 
contour cultivation, diversion 
ditches and terraces, seedings of 
grasses and cover crops. 

Pasture and Hay Crops: 

1. There is a shortage of high 
quality clover and grass seeds. 
Order qifality seeds early and seed 
according to the most effective 
plans. »\^ , • 

2. Cure higher quality hay. 
Grain Crops: Adapted hybrid 

corn seed and use of Balbo rye for 
both hay and pasture are recom- 
mended. 

Livestock: Pasture, the cheap- 
est and best of all feeds, muSt be 
Improved and more effectively 
used. Eight months of pasture 
and one acre of alfalfa or good 
legume hay per cow was approved 
in all programs. 

Disease control and"* Improved 
breeding stock are fundamental 
for all livestock programs. 

Tobacco is the most important 
cash crop. Large numbers of lead- 
ers report to have exceeded the ton 
per acre yield goal last year. Plans 
were made for further widespread 
uses of high yielding production 
practices. 

Livestock water supply improve- 
ment, truck crops, fruit, home food 
production, marketing, and farm 
labor were also included in the 
program. Community farm lead- 
ers who will hold 1945 planning 
meetings in the near future in 
elude: 

Verona at the bank, Thursday, 
January 25th at 2:00 p. in. 

Constance at school, Thursday, 
January 25th at 8:00 p. m. 

Grant, at school, Friday, Jana- 
ary 26th, at 7:30 p. m. 

Burlington, at County Agent's 
office, Monday, January 29th at 
7:45 p. m. 

Oountyjride. planning meetings 
in poultry, fruit, and tobacco will 
be held in the near future. Farm- 
ers are invited to take part to 
planning all programs pertaining 
to their farm interests. 



One hundred thirty-seven Boone 
County men reported at Draft 
Board 9, Burlington Wednesday for 
their preinductton examination. 
These men were sent to Lou isvi l le 
induction center for examination, 
according to C. G. Kelly, Clerk of 
the Board. 

This is the largest call to sever- 
al months, it was announced. 



Lewis Shields Killed 

In Belgium lee. 25th 



DELEGATES NAMED 



LEO 
VERNON POPE NAMED VOTING 



JANUARY 



2ND. 



The advisory council of 
County Homemakers has 
Mrs. Leo Flynn, Walton, and Mrs. 
Vernon Pope, Burlington, for vot- 
ing delegates to Farm and Home 
Week. The majority of local dubs 
also plan to send delegates for the 

I four-day convention at tine Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, January 3eth- 

e.-Bg*. i*w» r . o"«~-. *««-« Fehrukrv 2nd. 
basketball coach of Walton High 
School, was killed to action De- 



rttea 

cember 25th in Belgium, according 
to a War Department telegram re- 
ceived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Shields, of Elizabeth, Ind. 

Sgt. Shields was a member of 
the First Army and had been over- 
seas since July, 1943. He entered 
the Army May 19, 1942. 

He was an alumnus of George- 
town College and he became asso- 
ciated with the Walton school as 
coach and mathematics teacher in 
1938. 



i 



Walton Man Awarded 

Bronze Star Medal 



Tech. 4 A. W. Warner, Walton has 
been awarded the Bronze Star for 
meritorious achievement while 
serving with a Field Artillery bat- 
tery In France and Belgium. 

The citation accompanying the 
decoration said the Kentucklan 
had performed courageously to the 
installation and maintenance of 
the wire communications for his 
battery in the period from. Aug. 27 
to Oct. 28. 

Tech. Warner Is married and his 
wife, Mrs. Virginia Struve Warner 
and small son live on Walton R. 2. 



Farm And Home Convention 
Offer Interesting Program 



The 33rd Annual Farm and Heme 
Convention to be held at the Col- 
lege of Agriculture of the Unlver 
slty at Lexington will open next 
Tuesday, January 30th. Interest- 
ing and up-to-date farm educa- 
tional programs will be open to aTl 
attending. 

The Tuesday program will be de- 
voted to tobacco and post' war 
problems; the Wednesday program 
to farm labor, agricultural, social, 
and economic problems and farm 
water supply; the Thursday pro- 
gram will include special meetings 
on soils, poultry; livestock, veter-J 
lnary, dairy, fruit and community 
life. Friday will be devoted to soils 
livestock, dairy and breed associa- 
tion meetings. 

There will probably be extra car 
room for several farmers who do 
not have their own transporta- 
tion to the meeting. All farmers 
expecting to attend are urged to 
notify the County Agent's office. 



February 2nd. 

The women will meet to 
orial Hall. Plans are being made 
to accommodate 1,200 to 1,500 wo- 
men. The program will include a 
variety of su b j ects relating to the 
home and the part women ace tak- 
ing in Agriculture and world af- 
fairs. 

Speakers and their subjects the 
first day are: Dean Thwna* P. 
Cooper, "Looking Ahead with the 
Farm Family"; Dr. O. B. 
University Minneso t a . 
"Adjusting to a Changing: World," 
and Dr. C. Horace Hamilton, North 
Carolina State College, "Rural 
Health— What Can We Do About 
It?" 

The second days' sp e ak ers are 
President H. L. Donovan . of the 
University of Kentucky whose sub- 
ject will be "The University in Our 
Changing World"; Morse Salisbury, 
Washington, "Out Role to World 
Relief"; Gov. Thomas L. Bailey of 
Mississippi, "Building' on Solid 
Foundations,'" and Rabbi Joseph 
Rauch, Louisville; "What Do Ton 
Want Russia To Be?" 

Third 3ay speakers win Include 
Dr. T. O. Hall of Lexington, repre- 
senting tike Veterans' Administra- 
tion; Dr. Renato Rosaldo, Univer- 
sity of Illinois, in an address to 
Latin-America, and Dr. Charles W. 
Welch, Louisvffle , speaking on "Re- 
ligion in TMenliiif~» Worid." 

Repor ts of the year's activities of 
the Kentucky Federation of Home- 
makers will he made Friday, and 
Cissy Gregg of the Courier- Journal 
jdll speak at a homemakers' lunch- 
eon. 

A meeting of the state nominat- 
ing committee will be held Tues- 
day afternoon. Mrs. Flynn has 
been asked to serve as chairman 
of this committee. The regular 
business meeting of the Kentucky 
Federation of Homemakers will ha 
held Wednesday night and Friday 
morning. 

A copy of the program may be 
obtained from the County or Home 
Agents' Office. 



Hold Open House 



Open house will be held at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Arnold 
on Sunday, January 2* for T-5 
John Robert Darby, who recently 
returned from Australia, after be- 
ing stationed there for thirty-five 
months. 



Correction 



Through a typographical error 
of the printer, the name of the 
Sunday School of the Bu llittsville 
Christian Church was omitted 
from the list of those organiza- 
tions helping with the furnishing 
of the Boone County Day Room at 
the AAF Convalescent Hospital, 
Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

This group was one of the moat 
generous subscribers, and its name 
is included in the framed list of 
participating organizations, which 
is displayed to the roam. 



MUSIC TEACHER LOSES 

GARAGE IN FIRE, FRIDAY 



Hunters And Fishermen 
Again Urged To Turn 
In 1944 Licenses 



TRAINING CLASS 
HELD WEDNESDAY 



Kentucky hunters were: again re- 
minded today by Earl Wallace, 
Director of the Division of Game 
and Fish, to fill out the form on 
the back of their hunting and fish- 
ing licenses and mail them in to 
the Division offices here immedi- 
ately, stating the amount and kind 
of game killed during the year 1944. 
The 1944 licenses expired on De- 
cember 31 and new licenses for 
1945 are now in the hands of the 
county court clerks of the state. 

To date the 1944 licenses have 
been returned at a very slow rate 
and Wallace pointed out that such 
information as would be placed on 
the back of the licenses would be 
of great value to the Division in 
compiling data on the amount of 
game killed in Kentucky each year 
by the sportsmen and the types of 
species taken In the hunter's and 
fisherman's bag. 

Send your 1944 hunting and 
fishing licenses to Frankfort to- 
day. • 



Dean Bloss, director of the 
Boone County Band, lost his gar- 
age, stripping room and fuel house 
by fire last Friday; His loss was 
estimated at $1,000. 

Mr. Bloss stated that due to the 
icy condition of the highways he 
was unable to take care of his 
music lessons to the various Boone 
County schools during the past 
few weeks. 



AT FLORENCE BY HOMEMAKER 



Mrs. Bernard Linville, of Carlisle, 
Mrs. C. H. Noel, Mrs. John White- 
nack and son J. H. of Harrodsburg 
were visiting: Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Rogers and son, a few days last 
week. » 



Burlington F iremen 

Will Meet Monday Night 

The Burlington Volunteer Fire 
Department will hold its regular 
monthly meeting on Monday night, 
January 29, at 7:30. 

Regular business and plans for 
the year' will be discussed at the 
meeting. 

All members are urged to I 
present at this meeting. 



IALIST BROUGHT 
ING MESSAGE. 



Nine home furnishings leaders of 
Homemakers' .Clubs attended a 
training class'last Wednesday to 
Florence. The meeting was held 
in the homcof Mrs. John Schram. 
ajfcji Vivian Curnutt, home fur- 
nishings specialist, University Of 
Kentucky, ted the discussion on 
'Room Combinations." The lead- 
ers were given training to combin- 
ing colors, designs, textures, and 
tones to a home. Methods of tat* 
proving a room without MenJtng 
extra money was stressed bJTMias 
Curnutt. / \ 

This lesson will be given to. local 
clubs by leaden daring February. 
Those who attended the train- 
ing class were: Mrs. Vernon Papa, 
Mrs. Margaret PraheL Mrs. Ida 
Herhstralt, Mia, Jolm.-fiulu-aiu, I 
Clyde Arnold, Mia. W. A. Rogers, 
Mrs. AUce Schneider, Mrs. John 
Taylor, Mrs. Jake Osex, Miss Vi- 
vian Curnutt and Mary Hand GiB- 
aspie. Home 



V 



JANU, 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



BDDHE COUNTY RECORDER 



and Owner 



RAYMOND COMBS. 



a* £» ru.1 Office, Burlington, Ky.. as Second Class Mail Matter 



THURSDAY 



BERT ADVERnSTNO MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 

ADVERTISING INFORMATION * 

DISPLAY: 2fte per T 'jili Inch. 

SroTICES AND CARDS Or TBANK8: 25 words and under 60c. Over 29 
words El JO. 

(SLASSDTKD ADS; 25 words (or 26c; minimum 15c; each additional 
word one cent each. AH classified ads. payable In advance. 
mechanical INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width IS 
ems; column depth,' SI inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription 



Rate 



.$150 Per Year 



AMERICAN PRESS 

Fee Over Fifty Yean 



KENTUCKY PRES! 

'AS SOCIATION , 

iHTflpn nTOTTit#i 



CORNS 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

,,wut 
BURLINGTON 95 

We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 




sharp and Intense Irritation. 
These pains are usually increased 
when the parts affected are furth- 
er Irritated by 111 fitting shoes, by 
friction or by other pressure. 

In the case of a soft corn, 
which is found in the web between 
the fourth and fifth toe, the cause 
is usually due to pressure brought 
about by the dropping of the fourth 
metatarsal bone which in turn 
presses upon the face of the fifth 
The possibility of eliminating a 
soft corn is very good provided 
proper shoes are worn and a met- 
atarsal bone to set it up in posture. 
The soft corn will gradually be- 
come smaller and finally disap- 
pear. 

Vascular corn is an over growth 
of skin, the same as occurs in hard 
corns, but In which blood vessels 
are found. The pain Is more severe. 
in this type of corn than in any 
o^her form, usually resulting in a 
burning sensation even when the 
victim is not standing or walk- 
ing.— Adv. 



Go To Church 



— 



Rev. W. • Guth. 

Sunday School 10:80/ a. m. 
Morning worship 11:30 a. m. 
Evening worship at 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Everyone la cordially invited to 
nttend these services. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Root. Carter, Paster 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



RABBIT HASH 



N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at — 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 Madison, Covington 



The most frequent of foot ills is 
the disagreeable growth which 
usually is found on the outer side 
of the little toe or on top of the 
second, third and fourth toes, and 
in some cases on the bottom of 
the great toes joint. The chief 
symtom is a burning, stinging 
pain of varying degrees. The form- 
ation of the growth produces a 
pressure upon the nerves which in 
turn gives rise to pain varying 
from a dull mild sensation to a 



The river is receding somewhat 
at this writing. 

Olad to report those on the sick 
list are somewhat improved. 

Mrs. Birdie Rector returned to 
her home after spending several 
week with her children in Peters- 
burg. 

The Wm. Delph sale, held Sat- 
urday was well attended. Mr. and 
Mrs. Elmer Jarrell and daughter, 
Mrs. Helen Buckler, Mrs. Mellie 
Wingate, Harold Hodges, Mrs. Edna 
Feldhaus and daughter, Wib Loud- 
den and family 'were dinner guests 
of the Delphs. 

W. B. Stephens celebrated his 
79th birthday last Saturday. We 
wish for him many more birth- 
days. 

Sorry to report that Herman 
Ryle lost two buildings by fire on 
Monday morning. 

Cliff Stephens and Robt. Wil- 
lfemson were here on furlough the 
past week. 

Several boys from here were in- 
ducted into the army last week. 

Mrs. Dora Delph is visiting her 
son Wm. Delph and family. 




FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Oilby 
Oreen Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

You are invited to corner-wor- 
ship an * work with us. 

RICHWOOB PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedinger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



— 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

of IL , ttJ^B&. x ^2S8Sf5 %&* 

Rti»Md by Wastata Nawapapar Union. 

Lesson for January 28 

. I*uon subject! and Scripture text* »J- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
CouncU oi Religious Education: used by 
permission. 



POSTED 

All oersons are nereoy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. E. Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm of J. W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. 

NOTE— Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



»'F""" WW ] 



MRS. EDTTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop] 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 up 

Cold Wave 

Permanent $10.00 up 

Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



glllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllilliilllllllllllllllllllllli 

1 WASHERS REPAIRED 1 




AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS. 
All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

| WM, HAGEDORN 

| 856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. = 

flllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllr 




gyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 




I CHAMBERS & GRUBBS 0FFER . , 



A service which the older residents of Boone County have 
known and respected for almost half a century— and which 
newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. 



>r 



1 Chambers & Grubbs j 

I rUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 352 || 

■&■■! liiiinnuiniiiiiinnHiniiMiiiiMiinmnniinnifinminniinnMir^ 



PIutXa 

AD leadlnff breeds U.S. *££***£»* 

SpprovJB. Blood-tcated. started chleki one, two and 
three weak* old. Price, right. Alaoi Baxadehlekj. 
FREECATALOG.Write: KtNTUCKY HATCHERY 

B27 WEST rOUKTIl griUCET . IJBXINOTON. KPfTUCKt 



BRING YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 

For Full Price and Honest 

Weight 

Phone: HEmlock 6135 

Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Claude R. McDonald, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. R. R. 
Witham, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us\§unday. 

BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam S. Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 
Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT). 

Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 
p. m. (CWT). 

Prayer services each Wednesday 
evening 8:30 (CWT). 

Services' each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. P 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Thursday evening 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 

S. S. at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car 
roll Washburn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m, 



Prayer meeting 
p. m. 



Wednesday -7:30 



LOYALTY TO THE KINGDOM 

LESSON TEXT— Matthew 6:SS; fill 16-». 

GOLDEN TEXT— Sea* ye Brtt the King- 
dom of God, and His righteousness; and ail 
these things shaU be added unto you.— 
Matthew 8:33. 

In the kingdom of Christ there 
must be unquestioned loyalty. If 
then He is the King of our lives, we 
as Christian men and women will 
want to v live in accordance with 
His blessed will. * 

Loyalty to Christ leads to the best 
kind of living. It surpasses any ex- 
perience of loyalty to a cause or a 
human personality. Instead of hin- 
dering or limiting our development, 
it opens wide the grand vistas of a 
life altogether worth-while. It is a 
life: 

I. Well Ordered (6:33); 

Much of the distress in which men 
and women find themselves is 
caused by the fact that their lives 
are hot well ordered. They live in 
a constant flurry of uncertainty, in- 
decision and disorder. They have 
no proper center for their lives, and 
consequently they are lopsided and 
lacking in real usefulness. 

See how delightfully right is the 
experience and activity of a follow- 
er of Christ. He is the center. The 
interests of His kingdom are the 
first in thought. His righteousness 
is the rule of life. Other things? 
Well, all that is necessary, God adds 
day by day. 

When the center of life is right, 
everything else is right— when that 
is wrong, all is wrong. Is your life 
centered in Christ? 

II. Kind (7:12). 

Spiritual principles apply to daily 
living, to our attitude toward our 
fellow men. Here we have the so- 
called Golden Rule. It is not the 
way of salvation; it is a summary 
of the teaching of the law and proph 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Record©! 
ISSUE OF JANUARY 25, IMS 



Commissary 



Florence 



Mrs. Josie Maurer and Mrs. 
Carrie Smith, of Belleview, were 
guests of Mrs. Scott, near here, on 
Tuesday. 

Miss Artie and Stella Ryle en- 
tertained Ed Botts and sister and 
Miss Martha Randall, Wednesday 
night 

Buffalo .. 

Mrs. Florence Brlatow and Mrs. 
Ada Love spent Friday with Mrs. 
Annie Huey. , 

Mrs. Ella Utz, Mrs. Mary Allen; 
and Mrs. Mary Aylor, spent last 
Tuesday with Mrs. J. S. Mason. 
Belleview 

Mr. Lewis Snyder is able to leave 
his bed after an illness of several 
days. 

Mrs. Ida Powell, of Prospect Hill, 
Ind., visited her father at this 
place a few days last week. 
Richwood 

The many friends of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. T. Hughes sympathize with 
them in the loss of their child. 

L. D. Jackson and Lee Gaines 
filled their ice houses Tuesday and 
Wednesday of last week. 
Flickertown 

Charles Hensley was calling on 
his brother Ed. and family, of Lo- 
cust Grove, Monday. 

John Deck and family were visit- 
ing Ben Akin and family, SundSy. 
McVille 

Fred McAtee and Lucian Louden 
visited at John Ed Louden's last 
week. 

Mrs. Armle Sullivan entertained 
Mesdames Will Sebree, Robert 
Akin, J. E. Louden and Miss Nancy 
Stucky, a few days since. 
Hathaway 

R.*R. Houston attended the sale 
of Henry Ross, near Union, last 
Tuesday. fc**- 

Cage Stephens, of Woolper, has 
purchased S. H. Marshall's * Gun- 
powder farm for $1,00.0. 
Big Bone 

c 



The Uttle daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Allie Laile is able to be up 
after an illness of two months. 

Mrs. James Tanner left Sunday 
for a week's visit with her sister, 
Mrs. Thorpe, of Worthville. 

Grant » 

James Thompson and H-. D. 
Brady will receive tobacco at this 
place. . 

Ed Sandofrd and Alfred Smith 
would like to sign with some good 
ball team the coming season. 
Bullittsville 

Rev. Early is boarding at Lee 
Cropper's, while his wife is visiting 
In Texas. 

Menter Martin took his saddle 
horse to the city to sell him one 
day last week. 

Idlewfld 

Mrs. B. F. Gaines spent Saturday 
in Petersburg with her sister, Mrs, 
Arthur Parker. 

Miss Maud Wingate, of Peters- 
burg, has returned home after 
spending a week with Mrs. Chas. 
Balsly. 

Llmaburff 

Mrs. Geo. Baker spent a few days 
last week with her daughter,' Mrs. 
Weaver, who has been ill. 

Mrs. Delila Utz is suffering from 
the effects of a bad fall, which 
she had last week. 

Rabbit Hash 

Born, Jan. 19th, to Thomas Kent 
and wife, a son. 

Mrs. Myra McConnell, of East 
Bend, has been suffering with 
rheumatism. 

Gunpowder 

William Dixon and two sons, of 
near Richwood, were guests of B. 
C. Surface, Sunday. 



J. T. Hughes put in a phone for 
ets. But it does provide us with a ^o Miller and hls son T H-| prf. 

splendid principle of daily conduct. j day ^ ^ ; 

Misses Mat'tie and Myrtle Miller 
entertained quite a crowd of young 
people with a flinch party, in hon- 
or of their cousins, Misses Mary 
and Sallle Baker, of Covington. 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 

Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday Scnou; each Sunday at 
10:30 (6$j£). Raymond Ashcraft, 
Supt. 

f reaching every imiuay at 11:30 

Evening Service at 7:au iC.W.T.) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 8:00. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 

BRETHREN 

Orion Erbaogn, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:30. 

You need your church. 



PETERSBURG METHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pa stor 
Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p: m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 

BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. 

Morning' Worship at 11:00. 

B. T. U. 6:45 (CWT) for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening- Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
7:30 p. m. 

You ate cordiafiy invited to at- 
tend. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 
10:00 A. M. Sunday School 
11:00 A. M. Worship. 
7:30 P. M. B^fcJt^ * 

8:00 P. ^Evangelistic Service. 
,8:00 P. M. Wednesday; Prayer 
and Bible Sturdy. 

ThircLMonday night, men's meet- 
ing. 



Gur active concern each day and 
in every touch with others is to be, 
"How would I like them to deal with 
me? Let me do thus to them." 
That is a higher standard than you 
think until you really try it. Only 
Christ can enable you to do it. 

III. Fruitful (7:16-20). 

Two fruit trees or vines may look 
almost alike until the fruit appears, 
and then we learn the true char- 
acter of each— whether good or bad. 

Every life brings forth some kind 
of fruit, and in its outward manifes- 
tation the life speaks of the inward 
condition of the life. Unclean and 
profane speech, hatred, dishonesty 
and trickery— these come out of an 
evil heart. Righteousness, pure and 
kindly speech, thoughtful actions, 
honest and straightforward dealings 
—these speak of the good heart. 

The one whose life is centered in 
Christ (see above) is a vine after 
God's own planting. His roots strike 
deep down into the grace and mercy 
of God, and his fruit is the Christ- 
like grace of Christian character 
(see Gal. 5:22, 23). 

IV. Genuine (7:21-23). 

Lip service will not do (v. 21). 
Even an imitation of the real serv- 
ice of God's people, but rendered 
without the backing of a life of faith, 
will result only in disappointment 
and our Lord's- own disavowal (vv. 
22, 23). 

The opposite of that is equally 
true. The real child of God works 
for Christ; he speaks of his Lord, 
and calls on His name. But in 
and through it all there is the evi- 
dent ring of sincerity and genuine- 
ness which marks it as the real 
thing. 

One does not hear much mention 
these days of hypocrites in the 
church. Perhaps we are too polite 
to speak of them, or it may be that 
we think them too obvious to need 
pointing out. But they are there, 
going through the motions of a 
Christian life, talking the language, 
and imitating the works, .but com- 
pletely dead spiritually.. 

V. Well Grounded (7:24-29). 

The -figure of speech changes. In- 
stead of being likened to fruit trees, 
men's lives are said to be like 
houses, with their various kinds of 
foundations and superstructures. 

The figure is an interesting and 
instructive one. There is only one 
foundation upon which one can build 
a Christian life. "Other foundation 
can no man lay than that is laid, 
which is Jesus Christ" (I Cor. 
1:11). 

Therein lies the folly of the mod- 
ernist or liberal. He has denied and 
rejected the only foundation— and 
yet tries to build a house of Chris- 
tian character. When the real prob- 
lems of life strike, he goes down in 
ruin. 

On the other hand, let no Christian 
who has laid a foundation on the 
rock fail to go on and build upon 
it. Thus grounded, his house of 
faith will stand though th* wind and 
rain and floods of life seek to tear 
it down. Of that kind of house we 
read that "it fell not: for it was 
founded upon a rock" (v. 25). 

Tftis lesson will afford many pro- 
fessed Christians a chance to test 
their lives and their loyalties by 
God's standards. 



NOTICE 



The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your 'desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



CONTINUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetualf Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER, 




'MEMBER 
CFEDERALUOME LO, 
^BAIW SYS TEM 




KENTUCKY 



New temporary location, next door, in former 
Rentier Drug Store building. 

3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Tarda. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope yon win eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES™?' a^J^'S! 

the first man yon meet. 




Kl! MTTKVUXE CHRISTIAN 
CMCBTK 
Noble Lucas, Minister 
Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijii§ 

| FULL CREDIT J 

given on H 

ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

1 TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 1 



= Phone ERL. 87 



Ambulance Service 

illlllllllllllllllll 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 



that leaves behind memories of enduring 
TO EXTEND TO ALL AMKE, regardless Of h( 
elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and 



\Uty. 

w modest or how 
pathetic service 



THARP & STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 



AMBULANCE 
SERVICE" 



PHONE 
FLORENCE 13 






— -« — - — 



bmmhmbbbbbbU 



THE BOONE COUNTY BEOORDKE, BUMLWOTON, KENTUCKY 



3= 




BELLEVIEW 

Mrs. Christen* Klrtley enter- 
tained the O. A.'s Wednesday night. 

Mrs. Wm. Deck and son were 
shopping in Erlanger, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Cook, of Pet- 
ersburg, visited Mr. and Mrs. John 
Maurer one day last week. 

Mrs. Clarence Wolfe and mother 
spent Thursday with Mrs. C. E. 
McNeely. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kruae and 



family were Saturday night dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ash- 
craft and daughters. 

Miss Patty Bcheben, of Erlanger 
has been visiting her grandparents 
Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Burcham 
and daughter. 

Charles Porter Shlnkle spent 
Wednesday night with Mrs. Lewis 
Rogers and daughter. 

Misses Geneva and Charlotte 
Ashcraft and Charles Shlnkle were 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 



Courtney Pope and family. 

Mrs. Hugh McArthur and daugh- 
ter Mary were callers here last 
Tuesday. 

Misses Jean and Irene White 
spent Wednesday night with Jan- 
ice Rae Ligon. > 

HEBRON 



DIXIE'S FINEST JFWELRY STORE 

FEATURING RELIABLE QUALITY 

AT ASSURED LOWEST PRICES 

10.BOCEBTT00. 

)IXIE HIGHWAY at Graves 



y EHLANCEH 




Mrs. Earl Tanner and son, of Br 
langer spent several days last week 
with Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Tanner. 
She has tfoe sympathy of her 
friends here in the death of her 
father Alonzo Odor, of Erlanger. 

Mrs. Addle Aylor Is spending sev- 
eral weeks'with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. 
Jones and family, of Burlington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn Hempfling 
and daughters, of Taylorsport, were 
Sunday guests' of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Hubert Conner. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Faulkner mov- 
ed to Ludlow, Thursday, having 
sold their farm. 

Chas. W. Riley has the sympathy 
of his host of friends in the death 
of his brother, Rev. Edgar Riley, of 
Lexington. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Baker and son 
Glenn of Bromley and Homer Bak- 
er of Ludlow, were the Sunday aft- 
ernoon guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ed 
Baker and Mrs. Nan Baker. 

Mrs. George Whorley, of Coving- 
ton spent several days here with 
her parents, Mr/ and Mrs. Earl 

Aylor. 

Mrs. Clarence Jones Is ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Peel and chil- 
dren are spending a few weeks 
with her parents Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Casper, of Ludlow. 



STEPHENSON MILL 
ROAD 

Sunday of last week, Mr. and 
Mrs. Levi Pennington had as their 
guests the following: Mr. and Mrs. 
Isaac Goforth, Mr. and Mrs. Port- 
er and Mr. and Mrs. Bud Goforth. 

Mrs. Walter Johnson and daugh- 
ter Wanda are visiting her brother 
Herbert Day and family. 

Miss Garland Walton, of Dayton, 
Ohio was the guest of Lucy Penn- 
ington of Walton, recently. 

Ethel Rader Is visiting her hus- 
band, Pvt. Harold Rader, who is 
stationed in South Carolina. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charley Smith and 
little daughter of Burning Springs, 
Ky., are visiting Levi Pennington 
and family this week. 

Wilson Pennington of Cincinnati 
visited Jimmy Pennington, Sunday. 

The community was sorry to 
hear of the death of Mrs. O'Neal 
and Charley Finnell. Both fam- 
ilies have the sympathy of this 
community, 
nlngton, Bettie Wills and GuyHR 

Mrs. Day is on the sick list this 
week. We wish for her a speedy 
recovery. 



NEEDED HYBRID COSH 

Charles Watson, farmer and 
stockyards owner in Madison coun- 
ty, produced about «W barrels of 
Reed's Yellow Dent and Tennessee 
Red Cob corn last year. 'Had r 
gn&wn all hybrid corn, Z would have 
had from 100 to 125 barrels more 
corn than I now have," was his 
comment to Farm Agent J. L. Mill- 
er. 



UNION 



son, Pvt. 



PRICE PIKE 



HAMILTON 



For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

ERLANGER -:■ KENTUCKY Try A Want Ad-They Sell 



Mr. and Mrs. Garland Huff and 
daughter spent Sunday with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Huff. 

Harry and Tom Huff were pain- 
fully bruised last Monday when 
their car plunged over an embank- 
ment on U. S. 42 near Beaver Lick. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Lovelace 
spent the week-end with her par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs. Claude Black. 
Mrs. Anna Huff was their Sunday 

guest. . 

James Wm. and Lloyd Huff, Rob- 
ert W. Carroll and Walter Whar- 
ton were among the many boys 
from this community who were ex- 
amined Wednesday, January 24 for 
armed service. _ 

William Wilson returned home 
the first of the week* after spend- 
ing several weeks in Florida. He 
and Victor Hamilton were guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Huff, Wed- 
nesday. 

James and Lloyd Huff, Victor 
Hamilton, Wm. Wilson and John 
Huff finished stripping Harry 
Huff's tobacco Thursday. 



Mr. and Mas. Louis Boh are the 
proud grandparents of a grand- 
daughter born to Mrs. Charles Hon 
January 9. 

Clyde Anderson called on Louis 
Boh, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Sieve and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Boh 
and grandson Charles Hon, Jr., 
were in Erlanger, Saturday. 

Mrs. Charles Hon and family are 
now residing with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis Boh, while her hus- 
band is serving in the Army in 
Burma. 

Clyde Anderson and Thelma 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Larry Sieve 
and daughter, Saturday. 

Bern to Pvt. and Mrs. Charles 
Hon, a daughter, named Peggy La 
verne, January 9. 

Cpl. Leo N. Boh is still in Camp 
DeRldder, La. 

Cpl. John Robert Darby is en- 
Joying a furlough at home, after 
being overseas 35 months.- 

Word was received that Sgt. 
Leonard Utz arrived safely in Eng- 
land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Sieve and 
Dianna called on friend> in Cov- 
ington, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Gross enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. Mike Goetz, 
Saturday. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Goetz called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Louis Boh, Sun- 
day. 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald Tanner en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. Surface 
Barlow, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Greenup, Miss Norma Laflaley, John 
Newman and William Feldhaus 
with a delightful party Tuesday 
evening at their home in the vill- 
age. 

J. C. Piatt Is home from a pleas- 
ant visit with relatives in Patriot, 
Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Noe, Mr. and 
Mrs. Surface Barlow, Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald Tanner were dinne r gue sts 
Saturday of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Greenup. 

Pvt. William Feldhaus left 
Thursday for Corcoran Field, Ma- 
con, Ga., after a two weeks* fur- 
lough with relatives and friends 
in the community. 

Mrs. B. L. Norman entertained 
Milton A. Wilmesherr at dinner 
Sunday. 

George Burkett Is confined to 



his home wJJft 

Mr. an* 
have with them, their 
Bobble Smith, wfco Is 
from a camp at Hew River, H 

Mr. and Mrs. Lora Mulllns 
tertafned Mr. and Mrs. 
Barlow and small sons, Mr 
Mrs. WtlMam Greenup, Miss Swe 
Allison Greenup at a charmingly 
appgjjpted dinner, Saturday night, 
January 13th. 

' Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Grater 
as house guests, their 
Miss Marian Grater of Detroit, 



CONSTANCE 




with L 

Mrs. Fred VahMtog. 

Mr. and Mrs. 2M VahMbg 
Sunday with her parents, Mr 
Mrs. Lewis and famfty. 

Mrs. 

Mrs-V. W 



Logan county 
30.000 acres of 
wheat acreage in 






NOTICE! 



Any person failing to receive one of ©or calend- 
ars, please write or call anil we will mail yon one 
promptly. 



. 



Chambers & Grubbs 

WALTON, -:- JtENTUCKT 



If you are interested in having a Locker Plant for Burlington and *l 

ritory, clip the agreement below, f ill ont properly, and attach your check, ami mail 

to the County Agent's office or The Boone County Recorder, 



AGREEMENT 

Burlington Locker Plant 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



- 



« 



In consideration of the rese: 
year commencing on the day my 

My remittance of $_ 



I request that you reserve for me in your Frozen Pood Locker Storage Plant at the above address one 
door type locker at $12.50 per ye^r each or one drawer type locker at $1W» per year eacn. 

tion of this locker for me, I hereby rent said locker for a period of one 
;ker is available for use. > 

u herewith, and I also agree to deposit TOe per key ft»not 
e are available, and abide by plant regulations. The key deposit 
keys. 



exceeding two keys per locker when the _ 

will be refunded to me when I surrender the locker and 



I understand that my money will be returned tome in full by the Bank to the %?¥J&? SZZ^SIl 
government does not grant the necessary priorities to permit the construction of this locker plant, or tt, 
for any other reason, the same is not constructed. 

I hereby certify that I qualify as a producer of foods as defined by the War Production Board. 



Accepted: 



Date. 



Name 



1945 





R. P. D. or St. 
Town - 



, VERONA 

The Hunt sale held Saturday was 
very well attended, considering the 
icy conditions of the highways. 

This community was shocked by 
the sudden death of Charles Fin- 
nell at his home Tuesday morn- 
ing of last week. His wife is with 
her father and family at present. 

The W. M. S. meeting at the 
church on Wednesday, January 17 
was well attended. Officers elect- 
ed were, President, Mrs. John Boy- 
er; vice president, Mrs. Robt. Orr, 
secretary, Mrs. Blanche Ransom; 
treasurer, Mrs. Relda Powers. 

Mrs. Mattie Whitson is somewhat 
improved at this writing. 



Make Remittance Payable To 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

^BURLINOTON, KENTUCKY 



\ 



IN ORDER TO SETTLE OWNERSHIP, THE FOLLOWING 
PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD AT AUCTION, ON 



Homemakers in Barren county 
ored green tomatoes in consider- 
able quantity by wrapping them 
in paper for ripening. 



ozen 



' 



Food 






SAT., FEB. 3RD 

AT 11:00 A.M. 

Otf THE OLD DILLON FARM THREE MILES EAST OF RAB- 
BIT HASH, JUST OFF THE RABBIT HASH AND UNION RD. 

LIVE STOCK— 16 head sheep, 4 years and younger, ready to 
lamb; 18 head cows, heifers and bull, Jerseys, Shorthorn and 
Black Angus, all purebred, some will freshen soon, probably by 
dale of sale; 4 horses, 13-year-old mare 1200 lbs, one coming 3- 
year-old mare 1000 lbs., one aged mare 1200, one Western black 
and white pony 8 years old ; 58 hogs, 7 Ijrood sows, bred 2 weeks. 
1 male 3501bs, 50 shoats, all these purebred spotted Poland 
China. .' * 



wiimiiiimiiiimiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiii""" 

•JNew James 

Theatre 

«NEW SHOW TIME 

One Show Each Night at 7:30 CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 8:30 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday ft Thors. 



• 



FEED — 100 bushels corn; some baled hay. 
FARMING EQUIPMENT— Truck wagon; disc harrow, Inter- 
nationals; Rastus plow; double shovel; One-horse jumper; three- 
horse riding plow; oil drum; 2-horse sled; 2 sets tug harness, 
halters; other small tools; work bench. 

HOUSEHOU>— Kitchen cabinet; Reliable cook range; 5-burner 
Perfection oil range; cherry cupboard, antique; table; safe * 2 
iron beds, etc. 



Buster Crablje.Al St. John, In 

BLAZING FRONTIER 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25TB 



Will Save You Money And Give 
You The Following Benefits: 

1. The average family saves $60.00 to $100.00 per year by ns- 
*• ing locker service. 

9 

2. You can butcher anytime of the year— summer or winter. 



TERMS— CASH 



LUNCH AT NOON 




I 




Owners 

Auctioneers: WORTHINGTON and KDpTLEY 



Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich 

KISNET 

FBI. ft SAT., JANUARY 26 ft 27 



George Brent, Priscilla Lane, in 

SILVER QUEEN 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28TH 



Larry Parks, Lynn Merrick, in 

STARS ON PARADE 

MONDAY, JANUARY WTH 



NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 30TH 



3. 75 Percent less work required than in canning fruits and 

vegetables. 

4. Preserve the garden-fresh flavor and food value of your 

own fruits and vegetables. 

5. A locker will serve as your stock of fresh fruits, vegetables 

and meats. One locker will hold a quarter of beef and one 

hog or approximately 100 frying chickens or the equivalent 

in fresh fruits and vegetables. Restocked as needed it wfll 

serve as a year round supply of fresh fruits. 

6. You can^serve roasting ears, freah cantaloup* or fried 
chicken lor Christmas or any time during the yenr. 



F00LT LOCKER 




Anne Shirley, Dennis Day, in 

MUSIC IN MANHATTAN 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31ST 
.IIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIimilllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



WILL GIVE YOU ALL QF THESE ADVANTAGES 
AND STIEL SAVE YOU MdNEY 

GIVE IT YOUR SUPPORT! 



IBUaSDAY, JANCAXY U, IMS 



GOOD TEAS 



TIM* M7 4-H club members la 
t** county produced food and 
crops last year with an 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, EEWlUCEt 




stated by T. H. Jones 
included hi the projects werl 1» 
Victory gardens on- TO acres from 
which 19,301 quarts of vegetables 
vara canned, 3,701 bushels stored 



dehydrated. 

Eighty-three members raised 5,- 
003 chickens; 30 members grew 01 
acres of corn with an average yield 
of 33% bushels per acre and 69 
members raised. 90 head of hogs 
weighing approximately 25,315 
pounds. Three acres of tobacco 
were grown. On his one acre, Ray 
Caudill produced 923 sticks of to- 



IGEO. W.HILL &COJ 



ARE YOU READY 

For Tin Biggest Farm Yoar In History 









/ 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 

best for field and garden 

Tried and proven . . . best results 
assured . . . high in germination and 
purity ... all fresh new seed. 



A PENNY POSTCARD WILL SAVE YOU DOLLARS 

PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



DR. SALESBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES AND 
DR. HESS PTZ POWDER AND PELLETS 



CEORCC W. 



Since MB9S 

ILL 

AMD — 

COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 

24-26 W. 25-29 PIKE 

SEVENTH ST. STREET 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



MANUFACTURE OF LEATHER SHOES FOR 
CIVILIAN CONSUMPTION WILL BE CUT BY 
55,000,000 PAIRS IN 1945. 



Buy- Good Shoes 



FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY 



at 



Luhn @ Stevie Shoe Store 



EXCLUSIVE DEALERS FOR 



Peters Diamond Brand 



vAND 



Weather Bird Shoes 



Luhn & Stevie Shoe Store 

34 PIKE ST. ■„.-.■'.' COVINGTON, *Y. 

X-Ray Fitting HE. 9558 



iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

WITH OUR BOYS IN 
THE SERVICE 

lllllimillUUIIIIIIIIHIIIIttllllllllllUMIIA 

Bhelton L. Love, APO 235, care 
Postmaster, San Francisco, Calif., 
writes: 
"My Friends of Boone County 

"As I gaze upon the world this 
morning, I see a much happier 
year ahead for all of us. Let's give 
a hand for all of our dear boys 
who are serving in the Philippines. 
May God bless them all. 

"I know everyone at home is 
doing his or her part to win this 
war and you can well be assured 
that we are. Let's back our boys 
up one hundred' percent all the 
way to Tokyo, Japan— Tojo's last 
stand. 

Let's help them all get back to 
their homes and loved ones as soon 
as possible, so that we may all live 
together in peace once again, and 
for always." 



Pvt. Tomas Dennler's address is 
Company "A" 53rd Tng. Bn., B. K. 
S. 4., 11th Regt., Camp Fannin, 
Texas. 

• * * 

Carvin Qoodridge of Hebron 
writes that he is now at Camp 
Blanding, Fla. He states that the 
weather is pleasant during the day 
but very cold at night. His address 
is: Pvt. Lawrence C. Goodridge 
35821423 Co. D. 192nd Bn., 60th 
IRTC, Camp Blanding, Fla. 

* * * 

The following letter was received 
from Bob Stephens, stationed 
somewhere in Italy: 

"I just received two copies of 
your paper and so I had to take 
time out to read them and then f 
decided I had better try to write 



THE TIME— 

February 14, St. Valentine's 
Day, when most folks are 
just a bit sentimental, and 
send mementos of different 
kinds. 




THE GIRI^- 

Any lady from 6 to 60 who 
likes to be beautiful in body 
and soul and — somebody's 
valentine. 

and THE PLACE— 

STEVENS STUDIOS,' where 
good portraits and photo- 
graphs are made. When you 
see the big valentine in our 
window, you will agree that a 
good photograph is what you 
want to send. 



No appointment needed. 
Open Saturdays to 9:00 
— Monday thru Friday to 
6:00 in the evening. 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 



-&- 



COVINGTON 

ARMY STORE 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 

CERTIFICATION OF 

AUTHORITY AG 095 

USEFUL 
NEEDS 

FOR 

Service 

MEN 

FURLOUGH BAGS 

ROLL KITS - APRON KITS - 

SHOE SHINE KITS 

SEWING KITS 

MONEY BELTS 

GARRISON CAPS 

OVERSEAS CAPS 

TIES - BELTS - SWEATERS 

CHEVRONS - COLLAR ENSIGN1A 

SHOULDER PATCHES 

SERVICE RIBBONS 

GARRISON BELTS 




you a few lines while I have time. 

"This Is the first day of the New 
year and it is drawing to a close. 
I have been working all day, but 
we still had time to eat. turkey. I 
guess, I have been lucky, this year, 
because I have had turkey for 
Xmas and New Years. I guess 
most of the fellows that are in the 
army had the same as I did. We 
really knew when the New came 
In this time. I didn't know Just 
what was going on at first, but 
when I noticed that it was 12:00 
I knew what it was all about. 

"Pete If you print this letter as 
I notice you usually do, I would 
like to thank all the folks that 
sent ttie cards and packages for 
Christmas. £ fellow so far from 
home and away so long really ap- 
preciates those things from the 
folks back home. I want to thank 
you for sending me the paper, I 
really do enjoy reading it. 

"1 know It has been a long time 
since I have written you, but we 
really are busy and I try to answer 
the letters I get, so you know how 
my time is spent. 

"I saw Herman Buckler a few 
days ago and we had quite a time 
together. We Had lots of things to 
talk about. 

"It looks like you folks really 
bought the war bonds this time. 
Well I have to close for now and 
thanks again for the paper." 
• • • 

The following letter was 
written by Sidney B. Brown, sta- 
tioned somewhere in the Phillipine 
Islands, to his mother: 
"Dear Mom, 

"Received your letter today and 
will take time out to let you and 
the rest know that I am getting 
along about the same, but felt 
much better when your letter ar- 
rived. 

"The rainy season has commenc- 
ed and it sure believes in raining. 
It doesn't rain constantly, there 
are days that are clear and bright 
but can change within a minute's 
time to near hurricane force. « 

"There isn't much news that I 
can write.- I haven't heard from 
William for two months or longer, 
hope he is alright and that he will 
get to come some soon. We have 
a movie set up now and it helps to 



^ 



Baby 
Chicks 

POULTRY EQUIPMENT 

POULTRY; - DAIRY - 

HOG FEED 

DR. SALSBURY REMEDIES 

Figaro Meat Curing Products 

HUGO 1 LANG 

Ful-O-Pep and Dr. Heinz 
Feeds 

512 Pike St.. Covington, Ky. 

HEmlock 9168 

OPEN TILl, 7 P. M. DAILY 



pass away the time. 

"There isn't near so much ex* 
citement here, as when we first ar- 
rived. I should tell you where I 
have been and what I have been 
doing you would worry yourself to 
death, so don't worry about, I have 
taken care of myself and think I 
have done a good Job of it. 

"The towns are dirty, the streets 
are like a hog pen and smell like 
onei 

"I haven t received your Christ- 
mas packages yet. This is Decem- 
ber 26 — they may come in a few 
days. 

"We have more protection now 
when we first came, but have alert 
now and then. It was hard for me 
to understand the Phillipinos at 
first, but now it isn't so hard. The 
homes are small, a hut ten by 
fifteen will hold about fifteen. They 
take turn about sleeping. The first 
half sleep three or four hours then 
the last half sleeps— the first half 
stands guard. 

« "You must take care of yourself. 
Glad aunt Marie is with you, hope 
she will stay all winter. Will close | 
for this time expecting to heari 
from you soon. 

"P. S. I received the Recorder j 
Christmas morning. The supplies , 
are coming in regular so we have 
plenty to eat — don't worry." 

The following was written by 
William J. Brown, stationed in Italy 
to his mother: 

"Dear Mother. I received your 
letter today and was glad to hear 
from you. I am still well and feel- 
ing fine, so everything's alright 
with me. 

"I don't know when I will be 
coming home, it looks like I will be 
here until the war is over. They 
can put most anything in the pap- 
er saying that we wouldn't have to 
stay overseas over eighteen months, 
but they haven't done anything to 
get us back in the states. We want 
to come back, but that doesn't 
help. This makes thirty months 



for me overseas and X have 441 could come home for Christmas 



combat days. 

"Most of the people in the states 
think we are having a good time. 
Looks like they would help us for 
what we have done — they are treat- 
ing the prisoners good In the States 
they are getting the best and we 
are getting what is left They don't 
think about what the prisoners 
have done, now they are getting 
the best. 

"1 haven't received any Christ- 
mas packages yet. Got The Re- 
corder and was sure glad to have 
something to read and to know 
what Is going on. We never see 
any other newspapers here. 

"I have been in a rest camp for 
five days, was sure nice, like being 
out of the army. I am back at Work 
again and will write as often as I 
can, depending on where I am and 
how everything is. 

"It looks as though we will have 
a white Christmas, snow knee deep 
and plenty cold. 

"I am making the best of every- 
thing. We are having fire now so 
it isn't so bad. I was in hopes I 



but guess not now, but we never 
know until the time cornea. 

"I have a picture £ am sending 
you. It was taken hi Florence, 
Italy, Octobaiu37th. The light was 
so bright it lsrrt very good but the 
best I can do now. Hope this finds 

you all well with lots of love." 

• • • 

Following is the address of 
Hugh H. McArthur, Jr. Engineer, 
care 8. S. Richard J. Hopkins, 
Fleet Post Office, New York, N, Y. 

The following is the address of 
Floyd Edward McArthur SM 3-c, 
613-42-81, USB Douglas H taz, 
(DD779) Detail, care Fleet Post Of- 
fice, San Francisco, Calif. 

Carl Turner of Hickman county 
realized a return of $17 for an in- 
ert of $3 for 100 pounds of 
minum nitrate used on his 
seed cotton. 




Eight tobacco growers in Wayne 
county this fall have constructed 
tobacco barns according to plans 
secured from the University of 

Kentucky. 



To All Members Of The Florence 

' * 

Building & Loan Association 



JUST RELEASED! 

32-Pc. (Service for 6 persons) 

BREAKFAST SETS 

2 Beautiful decorations 

IJPAJS 



We carry a complete stock of 
PYREX OVKNWARK 

PAT'S CHINA STORE 

Also Location of 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 Madison - Cov. HE. 4988 



ENAMEL 

Quick Dry. Walls, Woodwork and 
floors. Most all colors tM .98 

$2.75 val JLgal 



ALUMINUM PAINT 

Dutch Standard chrom- S<^.95 
atic Aluminum Paint . . ^pGal. 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



The Board of Directors of your Building 
and Loan Association appreciates the loan you 
have with them because you have been the means 
of this association growing from $24,000.00 in 
loans made at the end of Dec. 1926, our first year 
of operation, to $155,800.00 in loans outstanding 
as of September 30, 1944. * 

In order to keep in line with other building J 
and loan associations, this BoaroV/of Directors 
has passed a resolution to reduce your interest to 
a 5% participation plan. In other words, on each 
$200.00 borrowed your interest will be 20c per 
week for 50 weeks in the year, or $10.00 per year 
on $200.00. The total of your weekly payment 
made on the other two weeks will all be credited 
to your principal. In addition you will continue 
to receive dividends on the amount you have paid* 
on the principal of your loan. 

This of course will make a considerable re- 
duction in our earnings or your earnings because 
these earnings are distributed to you and the de- 
positors as dividends. In order to offset this we 
hope to get more loans, That is where you can 
help. If you tell your friends or neighbors, when 
they are planning to borrow on their homes or to 
purchase a home, to ask your building and loan 
association in Florence about their lending plan. 
You will not only be helping yourself by earning 
more dividends but you will be helping the com- 
munity by making your Association a bigger and 
better one. 



Respectfully yours, 






Florence Bldg. & Loan Association 

OSCEOLA C. LUCAS, Secretary 



HANDLE EM WITH 




After Three War Years, 
Need Continued Good 

Oil motors regularly according to manu- 
facturers' directions. (Some motors are en- 
closed in hermetically sealed units and need 
." no oiling.) 

Keep appliances clean; Wipe carefully 
after each using. Dirt, dust, food, crumbs, 
can cause trouble. 

Tighten nuts, bolts and screws at the first 
sign of looseness. 

Watch out for loose connections. If ap- 
pliance sparks or motor stalls, disconnect: 
instantly and have checked. 



Your Electric Appliances 
Care To Make 'Cm Last 









i 



Never i mmerse mi appliance to. water . It 
may result in a short circuit, damaged ap- 
pliance or both. 

Don't drop appliances and don't knock 
them around. Treat them with care. 

Don't tinker. Unless you know exactly 
what you're doing, have an expert service- 
man handle your repairs. 

Treat cords carefully. Don't kink, knot 
or allow to rub on sharp edges. Keep away 
from oil, moisture, hot appliances. Don't 
yank to disconnect. 






\ 



Coii 1 at Our Office for Suggestions on the Care andVse of Specific Appliances. 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



wconroRATiD 






I 






_DDD*S1 



M 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BBBUMOTOM, KBOOCKY 



OO 



tssbsbat, wtanmet **, 



jn«itHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiii»iintHinintini»HiiiiiinHiBii!iiMt»!imii!^^ 

Seen And Heard Around j 

the County Seat 



Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

Mrs. Nannie RiddeU remains 
quite Ul this week. 

Mrs. Melvin Jones has been ill 
for the past few day*. 

Melvin Wingate spent the week- 
end with Mr. and Mrs. Karl Sul- 
livan and daughter. 

Pvt. Noel Walton, of Ft. Lewis, 
Washington arrived Saturday night 
to. spend a furlough with his wife | 
and children. 



IIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIlllli 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee McNeely were 
Sunday guests of her mother, Mrs. 
Hena Presser. 



Joyce Finn returned home Sun- 
day evening after visiting lier 
brother and wife and the Hodges 
from Friday until Sunday. 

| JU 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Russell Finn, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Hodges were Mr. and Mrs. Rus- 
sell Finn, Sr., Joyce, Ernest, Louise 
McArthur and Bob Smith. 



Mrs. Helen Snyder spent Friday 
night with friends in Lawrence- 
burg, Ind. 

— i I ' .. I V 

Mrs. George Porter an* Mrs. Rob- 
ert Utz spent Monday in Coving- 
ton. 

Miss Mary Jane Pettlt returned 
last week after spending a week in 
New York City. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hall and 
family, of Latonia, spent Sunday 
with relatives here. 

Raymond Setters of the U. S. 
Navy is spending a furlough with 
his wife here. 

Easton Meyers of the U. S. Navy 
spent the week-end with Dr. and 
Mrs. M. A. Yelton and daughter 

Oeraldlne. 







OWN YOUR OWN HOME 



If you have a reasonable amount to pay dowfi on a 
home or a farm, come in and talk with us. We may 
be able to help you. We are anxious to make mort- 
gage loans and will take pleasure in discussing the 
matter with you. > ^ 

We will not encourage you to go in debt beyond 
your ability to pay, over a reasonable period* of 
years. 

The interest rate will be 5%. Our discussion con- 
fidential. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY , 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $150,000.00 



Bert Gaines, who was at Christ 
Hospital for observation several 
days' last week, returned home 
Sunday. 

The young people of the local 
Baptist Church had a short ser- 
vice at the home of Mr. and -Mrs. 
Charles Kelly, Sunday afternoon. 



FLORENCE 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe Huey and Mr. 
and Mrs. Franklin Huey were the 
Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wendell Easton. » 



^XHXHXHXHZHZHXHXMXHS 






,7 



Mrs. Davis and Miss Mildred Liz- 
er of Cincinnati* were week-end 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Llz- 
er and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Stephens, of 
Petersburg, called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Brown and family, Thurs- 
day evening. 

Mrs. Clare Ellis of Everett, Wash, 
is visiting her mother, Mrs. Len- 
ora Walton and other relatives of 
Florence. 

Mr. andMrs/Robert Maurer and 
son Bobby, Mrs. Josie Maurer, 
Edgar Maurer and Miss Joy Maur- 
er were dinner guests Sunday of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Smith, 



Women in Service Work 
Applaud these Styles! 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like for your 
hours on duty . . . feminine and flattering for your gala even- 
ings! Oet your go-everywhere hairstyle today! 

A LaRose Permanent will make it last and last 

RESTYLING-CUT, SHAMPOO-SET $2.00 

LaRose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Collins, Prop. 



Karen Sue Benson, daughter of 
Cpl. and Mrs. Charles N. Benson, 
celebrated her first birthday Mon- 
day with a dinner at the home of 
her grandparents. The following 
relatives were present: her moth- 
er ,Mrs. Charles Benson, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Smith, Dewey Ray 
Benson, Charlotte Benson and Mr. 
and Mrs. C. D. Benson. She receiv- 
ed a number of gifts, among them 
being one from her father who is 
stationed in the South Pacific with 
the U. S. M. C. 



Friends of Mrs. Maud Bennett 
regret to learn of her illness. . 

Mtfee Geraldine Herrington spent 
the week-end with her mother, 
Mrs. Bffle Herrington, of New- 
port. 

Mrs. Ardell Fox and little son 
Billy Dale enjoyed a few days' visit 
last week with Mrs. Helen Orschelle 
and family, of Dortha Ave. 

Sam Hambrick, of Burlington 
was a welcome visitor here Satur- 
day. 

Harvey Fullilove has purchased 
property in Florence and will move 
hi the near future. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Stephenson 
and Mrs. David Wingate attended 
the funeral of Charles S. Finnell, 
of Verona, on Thursday. 

We wish to express sympathy to 
the family of Alonzo Oder, who 
passed away at Booth Hospital on 
Thursday. 

Friends are sorry to learn* that 
Mrs. M. O. Martin Is on( the sick 

list. v * «K*x 

Mr. and Mrs. Finnell Osborn, of 
Covington were Monday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. David Osborn and 
family. 

Col. Lute Bradford and wife en- 
tertained a group of relatives and 
friends with a delightful dinner 
party on Sunday in honor of their 
son, Lucian. 

Dulton Aylor has returned to 
Texas after enjoying a leave with 
home folks. • - 

Mrs. Floyd jBininger, who has a 
nice position^at Ed Osborn's de- 
partment store was ill at her home 
over the week-end. 

Mr. and Mrs. --Elbert Cook enter- 
tained a group of relatives with a 
'delightful six o'clock dinner on 
I Wednesday . evening in honor of 
their daughter Sarah's birthday. A 
lovely birthday cake was baked and 
decorated by her mother for the 
occasion and she received a num- 
ber of nice gifts. Covers were laid 
for Mr. and Mrs. Gus First and 
granddaughter of Cincinnati, Mrs. 
Sarah Lusher of Erlanger and Miss 
Dorothy Nell Lusher, of Covington. 
All left wishing her many more 
happy birthdays. _ 

Pvt. Edward Biddle is now sta- 
tioned at Camp Blanding, Fla. His 
address is Pvt. Edward Biddle 3582- 
1417, D 192 60 IRTC, Camp Bland- 
ing, Fla. 



t Ave., Blsmere. Burial was In Flor- 
ence Cemetery. 

Dad Clutterbuck. who has been 

confined to home due to illness the 

rct "MfrfrM rrfarfr Unproved and 

sp*eV£fcfa week with his sister, 

Mr*. Bd Otttttta arid husband. 

Mrs. Grace Acra and Mrs. E. 
Connley, of Erlanger spent Thurs- 
day afternoon with Mrs. John M. 
Connley and sons. 

Mrs. Emma Griggs, of Covington 
spent Wednesday with Mrs. O. R. 
Rust. 

Sgt. Francis K. Souther and 
family spent Tuesday evening with 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 

and son s. a ' j. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Aylor enter- 
tained with a dinner on Tuesday 
in honor of his nephew Dulton 
Aylor, who is stationed In Texas 
spending a furlough at home. 

Robert McCardle, who has been 
taking treatment at Dillsboro, Ind., 
has returned home and is con- 
valescing slowly. 

Glad to report Miss Margaret 
Aylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guy Aylor of Goodridge Drive, who 
has been ill at Good Samaritan 
Hospital is much improved and re- 
turned home on Saturday. Her 
many friends wish her a speedy 
recovery. 

Ben Anten, who has been ill at 
Booth Hospital the past two weeks 
is reported to be convalescing and 
will soon return to his home, much 
to the delight of his many friends, 
here. 

Mrs. John M. Connley and sons 
spent Sunday with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Baxter and 
family, of Harrison, Ind. 

Mrs. Lillian Ryle, of Covington 
visited Mr. and Mrs. Lon Clore on 
Saturday evening. 



river view 



The farmers are very busy de- 
livering their tobacco te market. 

Congratulations to 8ft. and Mrs. 
Deioert Hubbard upon the arrival 
of a fine girl at Booth Hospital 
Sunday. Jan. 21. 

Mrs. Gladys Sullivan, of- Gun- 
powder spent Tuesday with her 
sister, Mrs. Henry Black and hus- 



■«■■ 



Covington _ 

ley and Henry Black, 
Hlghtower and Bruce Ryle to the 
CarroTJton market Tuesday. 

W. B. Stephens spent the week- 
end with Punk and BIB Stephens. 

Bob Williamson of the U. 8. Savy 
is enjoying a few days* leave with 
his wife and children. 

Frank Green called on 
Black Sunday morning. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Craig, of Cov- 
ington spent Sunday with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Craig. 
er guests included Seaman and 

•s. Bob Wilkamson and children, 
and firs. Cliff Stephens 
and children. 

^Clifford Ste p h en s of H»s~fF.-~ftf^ 
Navy Is enjoying a 17-day furlough 
with his wife and children. 

Quite a large crowd attended 
BUI Delph's sale, Saturday. 

Mis. Londalea Ryle of Covington 
spent several days last week with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John 
Ryle and son. 

Charley Black called on his 
brother Henry and .wife, Monday. 

We are sorry Pvt. John Kittle is 
ill in a hospital at Camp Atter- 
bury, Ind. We wish for him a 
speedy recovery., 

Carl and Jack Bodle and Bob 
Smith delivered their tobacco to 



■MM 



ELASTIC 

GARTERRUBBER 

Come in and shop 
for many other 
BUYS! 



I 




I 3tf Pike 



rilllllllllllllHIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIHHIIIIII 



The funeral of Harry H. Brown 
63, supervisor for the John Doug- 
las Plumbing Co., Carthage, O., for 
the past 33 years, passed away on 
Thursday at his home 502 Garvey 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Conner 
spent Sunday in Lexington, Ky., 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Denny and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Russ enter- 
tained a group of friends from 
Cincinnati, Sunday afternoon. 
Friends of Mrs. Lawrence Thomp- 
son regret to learn she is a patient 
in the Hospital where she under- 
went an operation the past week. 
We wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Dr. Gladys Rouse has returned 
home after spending a few days 
with Rev. Paternoster and family, 
of Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Sarah Mark§sbery is very ill 
at her residence. /We wish for her 
a speedy recovery. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



FARMERS ! 

RED CLOVER and ALFALFA HAY 

GRASS SEEDS and FERTILIZERS 

Order early so we can be able to supply yon. 

FLORENCE FEED & ELECTRIC STORE 

RAYMOND GROSS, Prop. 
Flor. 106. Florence, Ky- 



COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
47 Dixie Highway -:- Erlanger, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

MORTON SUGAR CURE - TENDER QUICK 

MEAT PUMPS - SAUSAGE SEASONING 



Former Boone County 
Woman Boasts Sister 
And Son In Service 



The Home Store 

^IIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII"IM»«l" ,, * ,,m,,,,,l,l,l,,,,,,,,,,,,W,l,,,,,,,,,(,Ui,,,S 
ORDER YOUR REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL 

FERTILIZER NOW! - 

WE WILL HAVE OUR NEW CROP GRASS SEED ABOUT FEB- 
W 1-BOOK YOUR ORDE R NOW! 

47-INCH, 12-INCH STAY HEAVY FENCE . . . .rd. 55c 

47-W6IN. STAY HEAVY FENCE ..> "J, 75c 

32-INCH 6-IN. HEAVY FENCE • • • ™_/*£ 

BARB WIRE HEAVY 80-ROD SPOOL ......; * P*- *••» 






$1.50 



% 



TOBACCO SEEDS! 
STAFFORD'S SPECIAL ORIGINAL LONG LEAF 

GOLDEN BURLEY * ° 1 ' 

BELL'S BOURBON WHITE BURLEY, a smoker from 

bottom to top; root-rot resistant tobacco seed 1 os. $1.50 

NO. 16. WHITE BURLEY CERTIFIED SEED J «• *«• 

WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY * •»• J}- 5 ® 

NO S3 WHITE BURLEY WILT RESISTANT SEED os. $1.50 



WHITE VILLA FLOUR * J* *• J}* 3 * 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR • • •** l »- ♦*••" 

WHITE VILLA FLOUR k 5 "»• «■ 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR ? ,» »• ffc 

SWEET HICKORY COFFEE 'T5 > & 

WHITE VILLA COFFEE . •* »• ™* 

HONEY GROVE COFFEE 1 ». 26c 

OLD BOONE COFFEE, bulk 1 10. *»c 



100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 
100 LB. 



SHELLED CORN 42.80 

CRACKED CORN ....$2.90 

SCRATCH FEED •> ......> $3.25 

32% DAIRY »\ * 3 - 30 

24% DAIRY * ZM 

DEARBORN HOG and PIG RATION $3.50 

16%^DAIRY r •••••*• , * 300 

WHEAT MIDDLINGS - • • • $2.65 

MIX FEED •••V **- 65 

SOYBEAN MEAL W.10 

DEARBORN LAYING MASH . . ..7777 $3.65 



Boasting 'both a sister and a son 
in the service is Mrs. Mae Hosklns, 
formerly of Hopeful Lane, Flor- 
ence, now of 330 W. 4th St., Cin- 
cinnati, whose son, Chester C. Hos- 
kins, seaman second class, re- 
cently returned to Little Creek, Va. 
after spending a leave with his 
mother. Her sister, Pvt. Winnie 
Fields, of the Army Air Corps, is 
stationed at Columbus, Miss. 

Pvt. Fields, who has been in the 
service one year, was a former 
General Electric employee. She is 
the daughter of Gus Fields, of 
Butler, Ky. 

Seaman Hoskinds entered the 
service in September. He was em- 
ployed by the Union News Co., of 
Cincinnati. His father, Petty Of- 
ficer Third Class Raymond Hos- 
kins is now serving in New Guinea. 



Major General Supports 
Infantile Paralysis Drive 

"I am eager to lend all possible 
support to the invaluable work of 
The National Foundation for In- 
fantile Paralysis. You may be as- 
sured that not only am I personal- 
ly concerned with the problems of 
infantile paralysis, but that the 
Medical Department of the Army 
has a great interest in the success 
of the Foundation's program," 
writes Major General Norman T. 
Kirk, The Surgeon General of the 
U. S. Army. 

"I wish I could tell you how 
many soldiers who have had in- 
fantile paralysis are now serving 
in the Army. We do not have avail- 
able statistics on this point. There 
can be no doubt, however, that a 
great many men who have had the 
disease are now performing mili- 
tary duty without any handicap 
whatever. 

"I trust that nothing will be al- 
lowed to interfere with the mag- 
nificent battle which The Nation- 
al Foundation for Infantile Par- 
alysis Is waging against this en- 
emy." 

Join the March of Dimes Janu- 
ary 14-31. 










Serve America 



NURSES WANTED 
to care for our wqpndedl 

Surely, nursing our wounded back 
to life and happiness is the finest 
service a girl can give her country. 
Many more nurses are urgently 
needed now . . * ask your local Red r 
Cross, today, about eligibility. 

It is vital that all of us step up 
our efforts — by buying more war 
bonds, by giving eitra blood — by 
sticking to essential war jobs, • 




See America Later 




6ULLEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



SEWING TRICKS HELPFUL 



Hundreds of farm families in 
Henrfa. county profited last year 
fromjr sewing tricks learned by 
homeraakers during the year. 
More than 2,000 new garments were 
made, 8,584 garments repaired, 1,- 
048 ready-made garments altered 
and 628 garments remodeled. 
Home Agent Bina Baird Foree also 
notes that 88 sewing machines were 
put in good working condition. 




VICTORY 



■ 



Highways wUl he _■—■ 

Happy Ways— again 

Greyhound's job today is moving 
manpower — men and woman in 
uniform, war workers, millions of 
essential travelers, Bnt Greyhound 
is also planning great things for 
you in the post-war days — bus 
trips and tours on a brand new 
scale of comfort, enjoyment. 



«* 



./ 



* "Serve America Now — See America Later* . . . thia hem 
America ever since the day of Pearl Harbor, If a 




OSBORN'S DEFfc STORfr 



Tel. Flor. 133 



Florence. Ky. 



GREYHOUND 






V 



m' 




THURSDAY. JANUARY IS, iMt 



THB BOONS COtTNTT RFOORDKR. BURLINGTON. BJW T UCS. 1 



— i 



TWENTY YEARS AGO , 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE 0F JANUARY M, IMS 



Ltanabwi 

Mr. and Mrs. James Pettit and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Qulley, — _— 

yigjj Rachel Utz spent Sunday 
afternoon with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Sarah Brown. 

Nonparid Park 

J. €. Layne and wife had as their 
week-end guest his father, J. C. 
Layne, Sr., of Cincinnati. 

L. T. Utz and wife, of Burling- 



(. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 
correction and 
protection of ■ 
EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 
Phone HE. 2088 



WANTED! 

All kinds of Band Instru- 
ments — Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxa phones; 
ete. 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 



540 Madison 



HE. 7413 



ton were guests Sunday of Perry 
Utz and family, of Union Pike. 
Gunpowder 

Mrs. Warner Senour, of Grange 
nelg i rtwi ho o d teTiurslnfj her 
sister, Mrs. R. E. Tanner. 

Mary, the little daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. H. F. Utz, spent Satur- 
day afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. 
Florence Floyd. 

Petersburg 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hensley, of 
Evansville, Ohio, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Gaines and little daughter 
Dorothy Ann, were the Sunday 
guests of Mr. William Hensley and 
family. „ 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Nix- 
on January 19th, a nine pound 
boy, named Paul Allen. 
Flickertown 

George Shinkle and family and 
Hugh Arnold and wife were guests 
Sunday of Porter Shinkle and wife. 

Willis Smith and family visited 
T. J. Bondurant and wife, Sunday. 
Big Bone 

Conner Carroll, wife and little 
•son visited relatives in the city, 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Miss Christena Jones, of Ludlow, 
was the guest of relatives here the 
better part of the week. 
Beaver Lick 

Mrs. James McCabe is suffering 
from an attaekof_^Qn§}litis. Her 
daughter, Mrs.^oward Feldhaus 
is with her. 

Miss Ethaline Burris, of Walton, 
was the week-end guest of her 
aunt Miss Linna Moore. 
Erlanger 

Raymond Newman and family 
and Mrs. Charles Hedges spent 
Monday with R. Feldhaus and 
family. 

Mrs. Russell Denady spent the 
mid-week with Mrs. Charles Beach 
of Covington. 

Hopeful 

Mrs. Homer Jones was brought 
home from the hospital Wednes- 
day after undergoing an operation 
for appendicitis. 

Mrs. Ernest Horton was called fco 



Florence, Saturday to see her 
mother, who Is quite ill. 
East Bend 

Mrs. Mellle Scott and Mrs. El- 
nora Hodges called on Mrs. Dessle 
and Ada Ryle, Thursday afternoon. 

Mrs. Lute Aylor and daughter 
spent Thursday with Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Hager. 

<fe Bullittsrille 

Daniel Earl, the four-year-old 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Clint Eggles- 
ton, has asthma. 

Mrs. Steve Marsbank was. badly 
burned a few weeks ago, but is 
able to be out again. 
Burlington 

Mrs. L. L. Eddins left Saturday 
for Richmond, where she will enter 
the State Normal School. 

Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Adams were 
entertained by Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Tolin Saturday and Sunday. 
Hebron 

Mrs. Missouri Rouse, of Lime- 
burg spent several days last week 
with her sister, Mrs. John T. Aylor. 

The little daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl Bradford, is very ill. 
Francesville 

Miss Sadie Reinjan spent the 
week-end with Misses Emma and 
Mary Frank Goodridge. 

Mrs. C. D. Scothorn was on the 
sick list this week. 



GASBURG 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 

Free checking 
R. Michels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St. Covington, Ky. 



Mr. and Mrs. Ellison Isaacs mov- 
ed to Mr. jonn Maurei s larm last 
Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Lanehart mov- 
ed from the Ogden farm to the 
Sutton place. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp had as 
their guest, Charles Joe Stephens, 
part of last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith and 
children spent Saturday with Mr. 
and Mrs. H. W. Baker. 

George Abdon, Jr., spent Friday 
night and Saturday with relatives 
and friends of Petersburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wllford Fleek mov- 
ed to Petersburg the first of this 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Burcham call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Burris one 
evening last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son were shopping in Aurora, Sat- 
urday. 

The many friends of Miss Doro- 
thy Baker, daughter of H. W. Bak- 
er were surprised last week when 
they learned of her marriage to 
Opl. Otis Tanner of Florence, Ky. 
Cpl. Tanner just returned to the 
States after spending approximate- 
ly two years overseas. Congratu- 
lations to Cpl. and Mrs. Tanner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Smith and 
children had as their guests Sun- 
day, Mr. and Mrs. John Burns and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Baker 
and Mrs. Hebert Deck. 

Cpl. and Mrs. Otis Tanner spent 



part of last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. H. W. Baker, 'Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Smith and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
sons were guests Sunday at the 
birthday dinner given at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Pope in 
honor of Mrs. Pope's daughter, Miss 
Agnes Marie Stephens. 

Albert Powell was called to Sand 
Gap by the serious Illness of his 
wife, who Is confined to her bed at 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Isaacs. 

Mrs. Allen Burcham is suffering 
an injured foot, caused by stepping 
on a nail. 

Glad to report that Cleve Aylor 
Is somewhat Improved. 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 



Mrs. Marshall Hanklnson Is 
spending a few days with her par- 
ents, at Verona. 

Quite a large crowd was in at- 
tendance at Big Bone Church on 
Sunday, despite the icy condition 
of the^joads. 

Several from here delivered to- 
bacco to Carrollton the past week. 

Mrs. Dorotha Williams spent Fri- 
day night with her uncle Ross 
Shinkle and family. 

Mrs. Dorotha Williams spent Sat- 
urday afternoon in Erlanger and 
remained until Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Schwenke and the Sebrees 
called on the Shinkle family Sun- 
day afternoon. 

M!m tefi Sch^enfc* ar»»nt. the 
week-end with home folks. 



It is estimated that Graves 
county strawberry growers will 
plant approximately 300 acres of 
strawberries next year. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. L. M. Hamilton, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:00 a. m. (CWT). John Whltaker, 
Sunt. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 7:30. 

We invite you to come and wor- 
ship with us. 



PUBLI 




«mi tfMMUMi Wrfofl 

is tiuhj « material aid to 
education . . . faulty eye- 
sight seriously retards it 



DR.J.O.TYSON 

'■■> O FFI C€T AT 

THtf ; *A<k.w.e£€;rtS'- i 

613 15 WIWSON gv,COv;iMGTQH 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE 
HIGHEST BIDDER AT MY FARM LOCATED 4 MILES NORTHWEST OF 
BURLINGTON AND V/i MILES SOUTHEAST OF IDLEWILD, ON THE 
BURLINGTON-IDLE WILD ROAD, BOONE COUNTY, KENTUCKY, 

Saturday, Feb 

| BEGINNING AT 12 O'CLOCK SHARP, CENTRAL WAR TIME 

The following personal property : One team good work horses and set of 
double harness; 3 cows, 2 fresh and 1 will be fresh in May; 2 wagons, box 
and hay bed; 2 mowing machines; 1 riding cultivator; 1 disc harrow; 1 
smoothing harrow; 1 hinge harrow; 1 land plow; 1 one-horse 5-shovel cult- 
ivator; 1 double shovel plow; 1 single shovel plow; one 2 -horse hay rake; 1 
corn roller; 1 sled, and set of new runners; 1 corn sheller ; 2 grindstones; 8 
or 10 stone jars, capacity 1 to 10 gallons; 1 corn planter; 1 posthole dig- 
ger; 1 crowbar; 1 vise; 1 sheep shearing machine; sheep shears; 1 long 
handle shovel; 1 pitchfork; 1 manure fork; 1 wheelbarrow \ 1 buggy; 1 
sleigh; 1 hand fruit sprayer; 1 crosscut saw; 2 saddles; 1 side saddle; 1 
sausage mill and staffer; 1 cream separator; 1 White Mountain ice cream 
freezer; 1 ten-gallon copper kettle; 5,000 or 6,000 tobacco sticks j 2 feeding 
troughs; lot of small tools; 1 bedroom suite; 1 set coil springs; 1 feather 
bed; 1 leather couch practically new; dishes, tables, chairs, a few antiques 
3 lard kettles; 1 one-man saw; and many other articles too numerous to 
mention. 



s 



G 



AYET 

THEATRE 



Y 



ERLANGER, ELSMERE, KY 



FREE PARKING LOT 



JLONIGHT — FRIDAY 

JANUARY *5TH AND 26TK 



A SHIP MOTH 

wmsi 

MtM' WITH 
GUTS I 

A STORY Of 
6L0RYI 




DOMMECHE 
OM ANDREWS 
WILLIAM EYTHE 

CUlKHttM 
Sir Mid lirliMi 



McVILLE 



Also vuiui btuiuvu "Aiie'd r"a»a 
FEATURE STARTS 7:13, 9:03 



Mr. and Mrs. Jess Louden and 
son spent Sunday and Monday 
with her family, Mrs. Mabel Abdon 
and children. 

Mrs. Florence Horton and daugh- 
ter spent Sunday with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Newman and 
children. 

Junior Abdon spent Monday 
night with his cousin Richard Ab- 
don. 

Mrs. William Clore and children 
spent the week-end with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Less Ryle and 
family. 

Charles Shinkle spent Tuesday 
night with Thelma Rogers. 

The community was deeply sad- 
dened upon learning of the death 
of Robert Louden. We extend our 
sincere sympathy to his father and 
family. 

Nellie Joe Purdy spent Wednes- 
day night with Sissie Presser. 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Pope en- 
tertained with - a turkey dinner 
Sunday in honor of their daugh- 
ters, Agnes Marie Stephens' birth- 
day. The following guests were 
present: Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Ca- 
son, Betty and Ivan, Mr. and Mrs. 
Pete Klopp and son, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Edward Walton and daugh- 
ter Charlotte and Geneva Ashcraft 
and Charles P. Shinkle. 

Garnett Surface, of Covington is 
spending the week end with his 
rnnoin Charles Shinto. 



SATURDAY 

JANUARY 27TH 
Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 




RUTH TIRRY 

OIOROI SYROH 

MMl HAtvir ' 

arfior toio mis »«• uan 

aal dom wntOH 

Chapter 9 "Flying Cadets" Comedy 

FEATURE STARTS: 

2:42, 4:35, 6:28, 8:21, 10:14 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

JANUARY 28TH AND 29TH 
Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:30 



An Elsmere Lady Spit 
Up Acid Liquids For^ 
Hours After Eating 

For hours after every meal, a 
Elsmere lady used to spit up a 
strong, acidulous liquid mixed with 
pieces of half-digested food. She 
says it was awful. At times she 
would nearly strangle. She had 
stomach bloat, daily headaches and 
constant irregular bowel action. 
Today, this lady eats her meals and 
enjoys them. And she sa>s the 
change is due to taking ERB- 
HELP, Her food agrees with her. 
No gas, bloat or spitting up after 
eating. She is also free of head- 
aches now, and bowels are regular, 
thanks to this Remarkable New 
Compound. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach; act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
dont go on suffering. Get ERB- 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. 




NORTH BEND ROAD 



There will be a special business 
meeting of the Sand Run Baptist 
Church, January 24, at which time 
the members will vote on the most 
progressive step of the church in 
many decades. Time 7:30 p. m. 
Every member is urged to attend 
this meeting. , W 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Earl Whlt- 
aker and daughter spent Wednes- 



day with Mr. and Mrs. John Whlt- 
aker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Wilson 
and Howard Wilson spent Sunday 
afternoon with relatives of Hart- 
well, Ohio. 

Bro. and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton 
and family were Sunday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Kllgour en- 
tertained Sunday for Mr. and Mrs. 
J. E. Caster and Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Snow and sons. 

Jeanle Henson spent the Week- 
end with Leila Eggleston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker called 
on Mr. and Mrs. Eraest Collins on 
Saturday evening. 

Ella Jean Washmuth spent Fri- 
day night and Saturday with Betty 
Jean Ryle. 



DR. A. W. HOPPER 



CHIROPRATIC PHYSICIAN 

ADAM8 BUILDING 

433 Madison Avenue 

Covington, Ky. 

Hours: 10-12 A. M., 2-5, 7-8 P. M. 
EXCEPT THURSDAYS AND SUN- 
DAYS. 

COlonial 9544 



T=n 



M-~ I.. »-_.-*.. 

imU-l.ll WMWII VMV|fpv 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining luster. We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 



* 



DeLAVAL SEPARATORS - 
PARTS and OIL 



MILKERS 





<31 PIKE ST. - 28 W. 7TH COVINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL HAULING 

DAY OR NIGHT 
;' LIVESTOCK and TOBACCO 

RUSSELL MILLER, JR. 

Phone Florence 823 Union, Ky., R. 1. 



. r,-- v 



TERMS : CASH 



. LIZZIE L KREYLICH 



BURLINGTON, KY. R. 1. 



LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



EHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXK 

NEW and CLEAN £ 

Used Furniture 




2 



Madison Furniture 
Store 

432-434 Madison Ave. 
Covington, -:- Kentucky 



^XHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXH 



JAMES CARDWELL 

ALLYN JOSLYN 

JOHN CAMPBELL 

Dir»ct»d by ArchU Mayo 
Produt.d by William U Baron 

Latest News, Disney Cartoon 



--—ALSO 

SUNDAY MATINEE and 
MONDAY NIGHT 

Chapter One of "Captain America" 
FEATURE STARTS 

Sunday: 2:44, 4:53, 6:39, 8:24, 10:09 
Monday: 7:30,9:39 



Jllllllllllllllllllliyilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllj: 

I PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO, I 



- COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 
~. 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 « 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ ■ 



J 



TUES., and WEDNESDAY 

JANUARY 30TH AND 31ST 



THEY'RE 
BACK 

AGAIN! <• 

SLEIGH 




»"Oon.W1th 
ThaWind" 



BAYLOR 



HI* 

roUof oittj ■■»&&-., 
M-G-M's 




WATERLOO BRIDGE 



MAMA oy$PEHSHAYA • 5. AOBREt SM1T1 

Also Sport Reel, Boots and Spurs 



INVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
BUY WAR BONDS 

■ We Issue Them 



SALE! 

Entire stock of Men's, Ladies and 
Childdren's clothing at 

GREATLY REDUCED PRICES 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," 
"Poll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



/I 



■BMBBBSa 




THE BOONE COUNT* 

=5 =2503 



BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



CONSTANCE 



Word has been received by Mrs. 
Vahlsing that her husband has re- 
ceived another stripe. He is now 
Cpl. Robert Vahlsing, Marine. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Vahlsing, of 



Covington, spent Sunday after- 
noon with Mr. and lira P. Vahl- 
sing, St., and Virginia. 

Olad to report at this writing 
that tittle Sandra Hodges is much 
improved. 

Mrs. Harold Burton has returned 




L J METZGER 



OPTOMETRIST 

03I Madison /li/e. 



- OPTICIAN 
Covington. /Tj 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 



PHONE 78 



PHONE 762 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



PBOVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed *2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet *•»*> 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet »•« 

32% Dairy Supplement f J«J» 

Big V Laying Mash **« 

40% Hog Supplement • f«J< 

Hog Ration • JjJ 

Pig and Sow Ration Jg 

55% Meat Scrap fg 

41% Soybean Meal J-"J 

Ground Wheat 2.90 

Wheat Middlings *•'» 

Wheat Bran J-JJ 

Corn Feed Meal •• • * • jg 

Hominy Meal • *'g 

Poultry Scratch "•JJ 

24% Brewery Grain %• 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet .„.*..< 3.30 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt *«g 

Block Salt •.. 'H 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells LZ5 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



home from Florida, where she 
silent a month with her husband, 
Harold Barton, Sl-c 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Cotton and 
family, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Prabel 
of Bromley spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Loee. 

Carol Lea Clayton spent Friday 
night with her aunt, Mrs. Bill Eul- 
coff , of Ludlow. t> 

Sorry to report Miss Virginia 
Vahlsing is ill at this writing. 

Miss Thelma Heist spent 8unday 
evening With Miss Rita Molder. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Hodges, 8r., 
and Mrs. Bilmer Tanner spent Sun- 
day afternoon with Mrs. C. L. 
Hodges, Jr., and Sandra. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kottmyer 
entertained Friday, January 5th at 
supper, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Berkshire and 
family, Mrs. J. L. Aylor and son, 
Mrs. Porter Huey, Miss Nancy Huey 
of Petersburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sel Vahlsing, of 
Bromley, spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Lewis and sons. 

Pvt. Richard Kottmyer returned 
to Camp Howze, Tetos, on Janu- 
lary 4th, after an emergency fur- 
lough due to the death of his 
grandfather, Capt. Henry Kott- 
myer. 

Mrs. Harry Clayton and son, of 
Bromley spent Sunday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. Fred Vahlsing 
and Virginia. 

Word was received by Mr. and 
Mrs. Jerry Reeves that their son, 




RNZHXMMXMBMXKXMSNZIIXHSIItt 



5 







Get More 
Out of Life 

* . 
Don't be handicapped by 
faulty vision. You owe it to 
yourself, and to those de- 
pendent on you, to be at youT 
best. 

Good vision and comfort- 
able eyes help you 1 get more 
out of life. Proper glasses, if 
needed, will help you save 
your eyesight for future 
years. Don't take chances. 
Let us examine your eyes. 



Pvt. Billy Reeves had been wound- 
ed in France and la being returned- 
to this country. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Smith, of 
Dayton, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
Jeff Howard. 

Charley Prabel spent Thursday 
evening with Mr. and Mrs. George 
Kottmyer. 

Olad to report Albert Prabel is 
much Improved at this writing, 

Mr. Harry Joe Klasserner is en- 
Joying a week's* vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer were 
supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ollie 
Kottmyer on Sunday* 

Mrs. Carrie Miller, of Hebron, 
spent Saturday *ttto Mrs. Henrietta 
Craven. 

Pvt/*Robert Russ. of Washington, 
D. C, is home on furlough. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry qayton, of 
Bromley entertained on Friday 
evening, Mrs. Martha Sebree, of 
Ludlow, IX. Robt. English, of Ft. 
Thomas Hospital and Mr. and Mrs. 
James F. Clayton. . 

Mrs. Harold Prabel and daugh- 
ter Diana of Dayton, are visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Prabel. 

Mrs. Duncan Huey and Mrs. 
Henry Kottmyer spent Monday m 
Cincinnati. ^. -JL 

Mrs. Harold Burton spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Ollie 
Kottmyer. . „ . 

Mrs. Lee Muenchenbach called 
on Mrs. James Clayton, Saturday 

morning. « . 

- Miss Nell Hempfling improves at 
the home of her sister, Mrs. Art 

Connelly. 

Mrs. Stella Clore, of Ludlow 
spent several days last week with 
Mrs. Geo. Kottmyer. 

Mrs. Albert Murphy of Hebron, 
and Mrs. James Clayton were din- 
ner guests in Cincinnati on Friday. 
Peggy Reeves spent the week- 
end with her mother in Cincinnati. 
Avalyon Goodridge and Vivian 
Craven spent Sunday afternoon in 
Hebron. ... 

Frances Loze spent Sunday with 
her sister Louise Purcell and chil- 
dren. 
Sanda Hodges is on the sick list. 
Stanley Maegley called on Geo. 
Maegley, Saturday night. 

Mrs. Henrietta Craven has been 
ill the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Smith were 
week-end guests of her sister, Mrs.| 
Howard and Mrs. Harry Prabel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Prabel and 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Cotton and chil- 
dren spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Geo. Loze. 

Mrs. Geo. Loze and Albert Prabel 
have been on the stek list for the 
past week. 
Cpl. Jas. Masters has arrived in 

Mrs. Geo. Ransler called on Mrs. 
Geo. Maegley last Wednesday. 

Try A Want Id— They Sell 



Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas were 
entertained Friday evening in the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Oharlae 
Eggleston of Constance. They en- 
tertained with a birthday dinner 
in honor of their son Billle, It being 
his 19th birthday. 

Mrs. Harold Schneider attended 
a bridal shower Thursday evening 
at the home of Mrs. Virginia Dam- 
eron, of Newport, given in honor of 
Miss Lorraine Goetz. - 

Mrs, Harold Utz and little daugh- 
ter Mary Lou of Hebron were the 
week-end guests of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Turner. 

Herman Hayes a t te nd ed the 
basketball game at Hebron Friday 
evening. 

Mrs. Mary Bttler, of Covington 
was the recent guest of her sister, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Hunter. 

Mrs. A. Rogers and Mrs. H. Sch- 
neider attended a leaders' train- 
ing meeting at Florence, Wednes- 
day. 



When Leonard King of 
county sold his tobacc o crap of 2, 
288 pounds from one acre for $1 ,- 
083, he found that careful treat- 
ment of his tobacco bed and use 
of fertilizer had paid waU. In 1843, 
he raised only M20 pounds on the 
same ground. According to Farm 
Agent H. M. Williams, King treat- 
ed his bed with bluestone-lime, 
then he turned under a good crim- 
son clover crop to which he ap- 
plied 1.500 pounds of p h o sphate . 
He also applied 1,000 pounds of 
8-9-8 fertilizer and 20 tons of barn- 
yard manure. 



•pent Sunday afternoon with 



HEBRON 



Mrs. Mamie Bullock called on 
Miss Jessie Gordon, Sunday after- 
noon. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmo Tanner called 



Mr. and Mrs. Arnold 
and Mr . and Mrs. Waller Seothorn 
attended the WIS Barn Danes at 
Music Hall, Sunday of last ween. 

Walton Blee calkd on Mrs. Lath- 
er Hood and family of Constance, 
Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Lawrence Wilson, < 
einnatl spent the 
Mr. and Mrs Suuaett 

The Hebron basketball 
the Florence teams at 
house Friday night 
won both games. 

Mr. and Mrs. 
son spent Sunday with 1 
Mrs. Henry Herrlngton and 

Mr. and Mrs. Ebno Tanner call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Sunday evening. 




BEAVER LICK 



William Wilson and Hume Cleek 
returned to their homes here last 
week, after a few weeks' stay at 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 

We were shocked and grieved to 
hear of the death of Charlie Fin- 
nell. We extend our sympathy to 
his widow, Mrs. Sheba Finnell. 

The many friends of Frank 
Davis will be pleased to learn that 
he is better, after several days' ill- 
ness. 

The New Haven Homemakers 
met with Mrs. Jake Cleek last 
Tuesday. Due to the icy roads 
many were unable to attend. A 
very interesting meeting was held, 
however, and a very enjoyable day 
was spent by those who managed 
to attend. Mrs. Griffith and Mrs. 
Taylor ably presented the lesson 
on "Accessories." Mrs. Cleek has 
very kindly invited the club to meet 
with her again on February 20. 



MAKE HOME REPAIRS NOW! 

. ... | 

Quality 

Roofings 




Bermuda grass pasture is rated 
high by L. H. Adams of Livingston 
county, who has been grazing beef 
cattle on it for many years. 




LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 

COVINGTON 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 

AIR CONDITIONED 



£xpett 

Service 
. . . available without delay 

If you need roof repairs, or an entirely new roof, 
there is no government regulation that willldelay 
the work. We have available ample stock of CAREY 
Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of prompt service 
and the biggest roof value to be had anywhere. 
Call us, or come in about your roofing n eed s . We 
handle all details. No red tape, 

•Buy WAR BONDS 

-d STAMPS , 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE . 

Erlanger Kentucky 



•■■ 



*.l* 




STANDARD FOR OVER 60 YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



"n't Make The Mistake When You Market Your Crop of Tobacco Which Represents Your Whole 

Year's Work. READ And BE CONVINCED. 



to 



WE HAVE BROKEN ALL RECORDS 



$50.45 Per Hundred Pounds 

TH K NOT ONLY TOPS THE CYNTHUNA MARKET » T ,S THE ]^^^^j^S^SSS&SS^ "^VWSSSSSS^ ^K 

SOME OF OUR HIGH 



HOPS 



Lbs. Ave. 



Lbs. Ave. 



Lbs. Ave. 



Reuben Cleaver, Nicholas . 3,338 

Pepper Bros., Bourbon • VEL 

Earl Shadd & Son *&* 

Win. Caldwell & Stroub .. ••••••• t«g 

J. A. St Paul Juett v- . -v- • • • • £.564 

Mrs. Mary P. Taylor St Kearns, Bourbon. . . .5,322 

Win. Shadd fjjj 

(Eddie Dunn, Bourbon , *•**" 

J. P. Denniston, Bourbon • »."« 

Roy Taylor ••■ *S 

Stroub St Switzer l,am 

Rorer '..._v...f 10,324 

Robertson 8,140 

9,452 



Geo. 

Hickman 

| McDowell Bros., 

Jack Burden .. 



$59.05 
$58.56 
$57.07 
$57.42 
$56.16 
$57.17 
$57.07 
$56.13 
$55.53 
$55.53 
$55.01 
$54.18 
$54.09 
$56.39 



Anna F. Franklin J'H? 

Leo Dryden |'*{£ 

Mr^Mag^Conner fcHieatt,' Robertson'. '. '. ".l'.OM 

Joe St August Lang *«» 

Fred Landrum . . . . .T. • MgJ 

Dewey Kuster , %*?i 

T. A. Collier — Judy *•£"* 

Joe & August Lang ...... • • • • • • • •»•£"» 

J. T. Wornall & Dailey, Bourbon t,m* 

Mary Cason St Clyde Haley -3,068 

Willie Mstrsh St Woodward, Robertson ..... .1,810 

Jessie Northcutt '•■■". J'JJJ 

J. W. Brewsaugh & E. McNees 1.844 



$54.44 
$55.58 
$56.03 
$56.98 
$55.08 
$55.01 
$54.49 
$55.02 
$55.09 
$55.95 
$54.83 
$55.34 
$55.77 
$55.25 



$55.58 
$56.59 
$55.93 



Louise Boutet St W. King, Pendleton 1,264 

J. T. Flanagan St R. Lyoiur. - -^ *.ot* , 

F. M. Hayes St Cecil Stone, Bourbon 7,058 sm.wj 

Felix E. King • • • •■•.•• 2,478 

Mrs,j*4. D. Martin & W. Harp & Son 7,524 

H. MTMcClanahan St T. Faulkner 1,784 

R. R. Ammerman WgJ 

J. c. Barnes St T. Barnes, Jr ifl34 

Emma Bell Shadd ...... • . • ■ • *g! 

Mrs. R. T. Wiglesworth St Withers A»*» 

Jackson St Lang Cummins .......' 1.818 

F: F. Dotson & Mason Miller, Nicholas 1,418 

1 Feeback, Nicholas 3,430 



Martin & Shell 

Melvin Florence, Bourbon 



2,914 



$55.05 
$55.82 
$55.40 
$55.19 
$55.31 
$56.23 

$55.25 
$56.09 
$55.96 
$56.59 



H. H. Hardin, Nicholas ^.q... J468 

R. S. St Glenn Hardin, Nicholas 2,014 

Vernon Jackson St Grover Carter, Nicholas. .5,652 

0. N. Ewing St Sherman Ooldie .••■«J2 

J. B. Miller, Nicholts 2,786 

O. H. Nelson St Newt Bishop 5.0C 

W. H. Thornberry St E. T. Burns : :-.JSP 

m. N. Ewing St Sherman Boldie 3,08 

James Waits St Clarence Piatt 3,390 

/Charles E. Burgess ''HH 

>C. B. Fritz 1.J8* 

Harry Judy *>*» 

W. F. Northcutt & Clyde Fryman 8,198 

Terry Bros. St C Parson *.«84 

Willie Marsh St Woodwood, Robertson tlO 



Ave. 

$55.14 
$55.32 
$5509 
$57.53 
$5&M 
$5831 
$ 5 4 ft ? 
$55.84 
$57.10 
$58.00 



$55.34 
$55.13 
$55 .34 



Don't Be Content With Less, When The BE&T Is At 



Pepper -Pfeak- Florence .._' 

MM> incorporated 



Wise. 



ROSS C. PEPPER 

Phone 418-W 



J. ROY PEAK 

Phone 136 



VIRGIL D. FLORENCE 

Pbone 406 



W. B. TUCKER 

Phone 278 



FRAZER LeBUS 



CLARENCE LeBUS 



OFFICE PHONE 57 




frT" 



<— «'»^i« i» - m ii n Mi i,. ^ 



TttUKSDAY. JANUARY 15, IMS 



^d— 



M. 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



■EBRON HOMEMAKERS 

>M Hebron Homemakers wM 
entertained by Mrs. Kathryn J. 
Fed on aJnuary 10th. The New 
Tear was started with a good at- 
tendance. There were 18 members 
and Msis Mary Hood OUlaspie pres- 
ent. Each member answered roll 
ball with a clothing hint. 

Daring the business session pre- 
sided over by Mrs. Marie Asbury, 
president, Mrs. Ruby Hollis, Live- 
at-Home leader, was appointed as 
delegate to Farm and Home Week 
in Lexington. L, 

The lesson given by Mrs. Hilda 
Hogan and Mrs. Bessie Acra on 
"Clothing Renovation" proved to be 
most helpful in these times when 
we should all try to co nserve as 
much as possible. 

The club will sponsor another 
paper collection on the 24th and 
25th of January. Anyone having 
paper please take to the school on 
these days. 

Mrs. Bessie Acra, program con- 
ductor gave the thought for the 
day in the form of a poem, "Look- 
ing Toward the New Tear." 'Abide 
With Me" was sung and several 
games were played. 

The February meeting will be at 
the home of Mrs.. Alice Schneider 
on February 14th. 

The Hebron Homemakers made 
40 utility soldiers' kits recently. 



CONSTANCE HOMEMAKERS 



The January meeting was held at 
the home of Mrs. John Hempfling. 
The meeting was opened by our 
president, Mrs. Vera Dolwick by 
singing one verse of 'Abide With 
Me," followed by salute to the flag 
and reading our Club Collect. — — 

Our prograif* chairman read a 
poem called "Sunshine," which very 
interesting. Our Live-at-Home 
chairman gave an interesting talk 
on poultry. 

At the noon hour a delicious 
luncheon was served. After lunch- 
eon our Home Demonstration 
Agent Miss Glllaspie, told all about 
the Boone County room at Ft. 
Thomas Convalescent Hospital, to 
which the club donated $15.00. 

Our program chairman also had 
some games. r 

Our next meeting will be held at 
the home of Mrs. Grace Dolwick, 
February 70i. 

-—Publicity Chairman. 



Marion Robinson of Greenup 
county has 103 White Rock pullets 

■ - »' .» a— . » iv — i- * -i- __ _ «■_,. _ — j 

. ■■ ■ HI l ***** AAA lipi Al VV iiiVU SJ« \S\A U\/V> 

' 1,584 eggs in one month, or 15 
per pallet. — 



PETERSBURG HOMEMAKERS 



Airs. li. fijl Chambers was hostess 
<to the HomemasRrs Thursday, Jan- 
uary 11.. Despite the cold' "Weath- 
er there were twelve membersXand 
the Home Demonstration Agent, 
Miss OUlaspie, present. 

Some very practical suggestions 
were given on remodeling clothes 
and making accessories, by the 
leaders. Our February ^meeting 




tt V UlL. 1AV11&L* Ui 



ib Reporter. 



r 



SMITH'S GROCERY 

fa 

We Deliver — Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, .:. KENTUCKY 



KALE 2 lbs. 25c 

CORN MEAL 5 lbs. 25c 

APPLES, Cooking or Eating per lb. 10c 

GRAPEFRUIT, large pink meat ea. 10c 

ORANGES, large per doz. 40c 

CELERY, Urge stalk a. 15c 

YAMS 2 lbs. 15c 

ENGLISH WALNUTS,' diamond brand . . lb. 40c 

MINCE MEAT, 1% lb. jar. 49c 

WILSONS MILK, large can ...... .1V4 pt. 10c 

NU MAID lb 2 points 20c 

BISQUICK lg. pkg. 33c 

AUNT JANES CHERRY PRESERVES jar 30c 

APPLE BUTTER '.* 2 lb. 6 oz. 25c 

NEW CABBAGE per lb. Sc°" 

BREAKFAST BACON, per lb 4 points 35c 

FRANKS, per lb 3 points 32c 

HOMINY GRITS, pkg. 10c 

HOMINY, Oram, per lb. 7c 



( 



i I fa I ■ 



Reg. 893.20 Deluxe Cavinet Sink $76.00 

Reg. 559.95 White Gas Range 49.95 

Reg. $139.95 22" Hot Air Furnace 109.95 

Reg. 69t Wash Boards 54 

Reg. 98c Iron Cords, 6 r approved 79 

Reg. $3.49 Pin Up Lamps wilH shade . . .' 2.98 

Reg. $29.95 Toilet Tank and Bowl. Al 25.95 

Reg. $13.95 30 Gal. Hot Water Tank* X. H 12.50 

Reg. $3.95 White Steel Medicine Cabinet 3.45 

Reg. $3.98 White Toilet Seat 3.19 

Reg. $78.50 Electric Water System (Pump) 74.50 

Reg. $9.95 Swing Spout Faucett 6.95 

Reg. $28.95 Deluxe Laundry Tray, steel trimmed, 

shelf, wash board, BRASS FAUCETT and stand 24.95 

Reg. 98c Rubber Sink Mats, black only 79 

Reg. 79c Oil Lamps, complete . . , . .59 

Reg. 35c White Towel Racks .29 

FIFE — VALVES — FITTINGS 

R. E. A. WIRING — CABINET SINKS — LITE FIXTURES 

WINKLER STOKERS — ELECTRIC WATER SYSTEMS 

Bluegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) 
121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5726 



LIST TOUR 

FARM OR PROPERTY 

You can take it off my list any time by letter. My commission is 
5%. I advertise, I sell. Fill in blanks below and mail to my address. 



For Immediate delivery 



Road or Highway . 

Acres 

Houses and Rooms ... 

' Bums ••■•••••• «v'v •••*•••••< 

Price , 

Amount of Loan 

Federal or Bank 

Post Office 



mimiiiiiiimiiiiimimiimmiiiiiKiiiiiiii 

His Week In OPA 

iiiitimiiii in linn tf ii mi iiitiii ii 

Lard, Oils Again Rationed 

Lard, shortening, salad and cook- 
ing oils have been returned to the 
ration list .effective at 12:01 a. m., 
Monday, January 22. 

The OPA ordered a three-day 
"freeze" of these commodities at 
the retail level on January 19, to 
allow retailers to take an inven- 
tory of their, supplies in an orderly 
fashion and to enable consumers 
to become fully informed of the 
new point values. 

A point value of 2 red points a 
pound has been set for all of these 
items. m 

Citrus Juices Now Rationed 
Canned grapefruit Juice and 
blended orange and grapefruit 
juice have been* returned to the ra- 
tion list, OPA announced this week. 
Both have been point-free since 
last June. 

Canned orange juice remains ra- 
tion-free, i 

The following point values have 
been set for grapefruit and blend- 
ed juices: No. 2 cans, 10 points; 
46-ounce cans, 20 points; No. 10 
cans, 40 points. 

Pork Cuts' Prices Reduced 
The Office of Price Administra- 
tion this week announced reduc- 
tions in celling prices, at both 
wholesale and retail levels, for cer- 
Itain pork cuts. 

Ceiling prices on certain whole- 
sale pork cuts have been reduced 
by one-haM to "otie cent a pound 
throughout the country. These re- 
ductions, effective January 22, 1945 
will be passed on to consumers. 
The pork cuts reduced in price are 
smoked loins, and rough shoulders, 
neck-bone-in. 

Retail ceiling prices on smoked 
pork loins and line cuts have been 
reduced by one to two cents a 
pound. These reductions are ef- 
fective January 26, 1945. 

Shotguns, Rifles Priced 
The War Production Board has 
authorized the manufacture' of a 
limited number of shotguns and 
rifles for sale to civilians, and the 
OPA has set dollar-and-cent ceil- 
ing prices on certain makes and 
allowed manufacturers, wholesalers 
jobbers and retailers a percentage 
increase. * 

The manufacturer and distribut- 
or must furnish the purchaser with 
a price list, which contains the 
maximum price for the purchaser's 
resale and contains the statement 
that the prices listed are the ap- 
proved OPA maximum prices. The 
seller must also furnish the pur- 
chaser with a tag or label stating 
the make or brand, name, model 
number and the retail ceiling price. 
No person may sell or deliver any 
rifle or shotgun unless such- a tag 
is attached and properly filled in, 
OPA said. 

RATIONING AT A GLANCE 

Processed Foods 

■ Blue stamps X-5 through Z-5, 

and A-2 through G2 in War Ration 

Book Four now good for 10 points 

each. 

Meats and Fats 
Red Stamps Q-5 through X-5 in 
War Ration Book Four now good 
for 10 points each. 
Sugar 
Sugar stamp 34 in Book Fpur 
now good for five pounds. Anoth- 
er sugar stamp will be validated on 
February 1, 1945. 

Airplane stamps 1, 2 and 3 in 
War Ration Book Three each good 
for one pair of shoes until further 
notice. 

Gasoline 
Stamp A-14 good for four gal- 
lons through March 21, 1945. B-5, 
B-6, C-5 and C-6 valid until furth- 
er notice. State and license plate 
number must be written on the 
face of each coupon Immediately 
upon receipt of book. 
Fuel Oil 
The unit value for each coupon 
in Periods 2 and 3 has been fixed 
at 10 gallons. Period 2 and 3 coup- 
on sheets became valld^ December 
18, 1944 and Period 4 coupon sheet 
becomes valid February 5, 1945.. 
Period 1, 2, 3 and 4 coupon sheets 
for consumers expire on August 31, 
1945. 



SURPRISE BIRTHDAY DINNER 



Relatives and 
at the home of Mrs 
of Rlcbwood Road, to help cele- 
brate the 76th birthday of her 
father Waller Jones, it also being 
the birthday of his granddaughter* 
Charlene Jones, who was 6 years 
oid. *_ 

Those to enjoy the occasion were 
Mrs. Will Rogers, Georgetown, Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Jones and chil- 
dren James, Marvin, Betty Rae of 
Union, Ky.; Mr. and Mrs. Everett 
Jones and sons Reilben and Olenn, 
of Hamilton; Mr. and Mrs. Oeorge 
Jones and children, Carl Ann and 
Phillip, ot Erlanger; Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Jones and children; Don- 
ald and Charlene, Cincinnati; Mr. 
and Mrs. Raymond Shields and 
children Lloyd, Ollle Mae, and Jo 
Ann, of Beaver Lick; Mrs. Esther 
Fields and daughter Marilyn, Cov- 
ington; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Aylor, 
Clinton Shields, Dorothy Shields, 
Walter Wharton and the host and 
hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Aylor 
and son Ronald. All left' wishing 
Mr. Jones many more happy birth- 
days. " '" '• • 



Conservation Officers ~ 

friends gathered Arfftft 79 Violators 

During November 



The Conservation Officers of the 
Division of Game and Fish receiv- 
ed 42 convictions for 40 cases tried 
on November arrests during that 
month, Earl Wallace, Director of 
the Division, announced today. 

The officers made 79 arrests 
during the month and brought 46 
of them to trial, receiving 42 con- 
victions and losing 4 cases. Trials 
for the other 33 men arrested were 
held over for a future date. No 
convictions #ere received on ar- 
rests made prior to November. The 
officers also checked 2,104 hunt- 
ing and fishing licenses and seized I 
a large amount of* contraband. 



U. 8. hybrid corn yielded 87 bus. 
per acre for Thurman Barrett of 
Lee county on land where It was 
estimated common corn Would pro- 
duce only 40 to 50 bushels. 



CARD OF THANKS 



We wish to express our sincere 
and heartfelt thanks for the kind- 
ness and sympathy shown us In 
the death of our dearly beloved son 
and brother, 
a w a. i ^Robert E. Louden 

The Cason girls for their beauti- 
ful" sotigs; the donors of, the lovely 
flowers; Rey. GuthjRev. Bedlnger 
and Rev. Johnson for their consol- 
ing words; and Chambers and 
Grubbs for their efficient manage- 
ment of the funeral. lt-p 
Father, Brothers and Sisters 



FOR SALE— Piano. Reasonable. 
Ambrose flier, Box 401. Route 28 
Devon, Kfc., 400 ft 8. ef Red Ar- 
row Tburlft Camp. lt-c 

LOST— White female fox hound. 
.., Tom ^Hamilton, Big Bone, Ken- 
tucky, n-pd 



FOR SALE— Warm morning heat- 
rola stove; used 4 months. Phone 
Hebron 318-X. £fc- 2c 

i : „sir 

FOR SALE— 13 Shoats weigh. 95 
40 pounds. Carl Dameron, Floj 
ence, Ky., R. 1. 81- 



JflOR SALE— Vfe ton pick-up 1 
International truck with 
Good rubber. Raymond Gross, 
Florence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 106. ltc 



W. M. U. OF UNION BAPTIST 

• The W. M. U. of the Union Bap- 
tist Church met January 12, at the 
church The meeting was opened 
by singing our yearly hymn. After 
repeating our watchword thirteen 
members responded to call. Scrip 
ture reading 1st Cpruuruans o-u 
was read by our president, Mrs. 
Raymond Newman. Prayer by Mrs. 
Fothergill. 

After a short business session, 
our program topic, "Working To- 
gether for a, Century" was brought 
by our program leader, Mrs. Lora 
Mullins, Miss Lucy Newman, Mrs. 
Ruth Mason, Mrs. Pearl Blanken- 
ker, Mrs. Marie Gschwind and Mrs. 
James A. Huey. 

We had sentence prayers for our 
country and men in service. Clos- 
ing prayer that, "All Centennial 
Goals May Be Achieved," by Ruth 
Mason. 

Mrs. J. T. Brlstow, Pub. Chm'n* 



HOPEFUL LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Sunday, Jan. 28, 1945. Bible 
School at 10:00 a. m. Mr. Ray- 
mond Beemon, Supt. 

Worship Service at 11:00 a. m. 
Rev. Paul Rlmmer will deliver the 
sermon and at which time mem- 
orial services for Pfc. William F. 
Bell, who died December 5 in Ger- 
many from wounds he received in 
action. " 



George Ward Now 






• • • . • 



......... 



>•• • •••••• 



R. F. D. 



*••••• i 



• «•••••■> 



.ft. 



KbL C. WaYMAN, REAL ESIAIt 



COVINGTON 



5107, INd. 5064 



BULLTTTSVILLE HOMEMAKERS. 

Mrs. Burnam Roberts was hostess 
tp the club at her home Thurday. 
The president called the meeting to 
order and "America" was sung. 

The H. D. A. gave a very inter- 
esting talk on different subjects. 
Mrs. Pfalzgraf was named secre- 
tary as Mrs. M. M. Lucas resigned, 
on account of leaving the neigh- 
borhood. 

We then adjourned for the lunch 
hour. We also had five birthdays 
to celebrate, which we all enjoyed. 

In the afternoon, Mrs. Acra, of 
Hebron gave an interesting lesson 
on "Remodeling Cloth." Our pro- 
gram conductor entertained with 
a poem of New Year and games. 

Eleven members and three visit- 
ors were present. The next meet- 
ing will be held February 15 at the 
home of Mrs. Huey Aylor. 

—Mrs. M. M. Lucas, Sec^. 



Local Boy Marries 

New York Girl 



William Harold Fresser, M, O. M. 
Ml-c son of M™ r>f>»«y Pr£««Ai- of 
Union, was married December 23 
to Miss Lucy Mae Haga, of New 
York, according to an announce- 
ment made this week. Harold is 
(stationed at Staten Island, N. Y. 



OBITUARY 

Robert Elwood Louden, son of 
Jesse and Rose Anna Louden was 
born April 22, 1906, in Boone coun- 
ty and departed this life January 
13, 1945 at the age of 38 years, 8 
months and 21 days. 

He leaves to mourn his passing, 
his father, Jesse Louden and seven 
brothers, Elbert, Wilbur, Jesse, Leo 
and Wendell of Burlington, Ky., 
George and James Roy, serving in 
the army somewhere in the Phil- 
ippine Islands; three sisters, Mrs. 
Lillie Webster, Mrs. Alberta Staggs 
and Mrs. Thelma Boh all of Boone 
County. His mother preceded him 
to the great beyond eight years 
ago. ' 

He was loved (and respected by 
all who knew him and will be 
greatly missed. I 

Your gentle face 'and patient smile 
With sadness, we will recall; 
You had a kindly word for each, 
And died beloved by all. 
The voice Is mule, and still the 

heart, 
That loved so well and true; 
Oh! bitter is the trial to part, 
From one so good as you! 
You are not forgotten, loved one, 
Nor will you ever be, 
As long* as life and memory last, 
We will remember thee! 
We miss you more — our hearts are, 

sore, 
As time goes by we will miss you 

more; 
Your loving smile, your gentle face 
No one can fill your vacant place. 



StatinnMJ in Kiirnta 

Mr. and mis. Anay war a, oi 
Florence received official an- 
nouncement that their son, Pvt. 
George C. Ward has arrived safe- 
ly in, Burma. 

He is a member of a Military 
Police unit, and has been in the 
service more than eight months. 



-T 



NOTICE 



The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



in Christian and Todd counties, 
125 Negro 4-H Club girls canned 2,- 
460 quarts of food, made or mended 
3,095 garments and raised 8,120 
chickens. 



Half of the sheepmen in Bullit 
county are now using the pheno- 
thiazlne treatment. /\ 

VLi. ; _ 



Robert Gevedon and Vester Mc- 
pherson of Carlisle county used 800 
pounds of 6-8-6 per acre in the 
plow furrow and increased corn 
yields 25 percent. 



FARMS for SALE 

240 ACRES— North of Burjjngton; 
nice level farm; 8-room house, 2 
barns, large silo; electric In all 
buildings. $75 per acre. 

155 ACRES southwest of Burling- 
ton; 4-room house, 2 barns, other 
outbuildings. $60 per acre. 

T7 ACRES— State road near Heb- 
ron; good house; nice dairy barn; 
fenced; lot of woods. $130 per A. 

147 ACRES Bulllttsvllle; nice farm, 
fenced; no brush, no briars, all 
bluegrass; good bldgs; dairy and 
tobacco barn; 7-room one-floor 
plan house; a good tenant on 
farm this year. $110 per acre. 

161 ACRES near Union; all fenced; 
2 barns, dairy' barn, silo, metal 
crib; 6-room house, electric; to- 
bacco barn. $65 per acre. 

25 ACRES near Union; good bldgs., 
stock and tools. $5000. 

BOONE COUNTY SPECIAL 

23 ACRES near new airport; house 
and barn on good road. $3650. 
$1000 cash. Vacant, move in. 
The above farm is Just a sample 

of my listing. I cannot advertise 

all of them, but I can finance any 

of them. • 

REL C. WAYMAN 

Office: 023 Washington St. 

Covington. Phone HE. 5107 

Ind. 5064 



Boone Circuit Court 
No. 42421 
C. Listen Hempfling, Admr. of 
the Estate of John McCartney, 
Dvb'J., fiaintiff 

NOTICE OF CREDITORS 
The Unknown Lineal Descendants 
and Heirs at Law of John 
McCartney, Dec'd. Defendants 
All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of John McCartney, 
deceased, are hereby notified and 
required to present the same, prov- 
en as required by law, to the un- 
dersigned Commissioner, at his of- 
fice, in the Court House in Bur- 
lington, Boone County, Kentucky, 
on or before the 5th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1945 and all claims not so 
proven and presented on or before 
said date shall be forever barred. 

Given under my hand as Mast- 
er Commissioner of the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court, this January 10th, 1945. 

A. D. YELTON, 
30-3t-c Master Commissioner 



FOR RENT— iy 2 acres tobacco 
ground; team and toois furnish- 
ed. W. T. Rudlcill, Burlington, 
Ky. 31-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Jersey cow with calf 
5» weeks old. John W. Ryle, Bur- 
lington, Ky. Tel. 205. lt-c 

a. 



WANTED— Man with small family 
to raise 3.5 acres of tobacco and 
work by day. B. C. Stephens, 
Petersburg, Ky. 31-2t-p 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO REPAIRa at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St tf 



WANTED— Mixed or straight hay; 
loose or baled. Ray Hill, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1. Heb. 266. lc 



WISCONSIN DAIRY COWS— Just 
arrived sixty head. These are 
all record Holsteih, Brown Swiss 
and Guernsey cows with plenty 
of quality. All T. 9. and Bang 

Unf»-< TT «>i - - - — — • • . . 

ificate with each cow. Also 60 
head of mares. - These are all 
good chunks with plenty of qual- 
ity. The price is cheap. If you 
are looking for work stock now 
is the time to buy. Also 6 riding 
horses. All stock guaranteed. A 
week's trial given. Easy pay- 
ments can be arranged. Hog 
feed, $1.75 per 100 pounds. GEN- 
ERAL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 East 
Second St., Covington, Ky. Open 
Sunday. lt-c. 



FOR SALE— Fresh Jersey cow with 
calf; also good 3-year-old horse, 
broke. Baker Bros. Tel. Walton 
285. 31-2t-p 

9 

FOR SALE — Coal range coow stove, 
green and ivory color, with steel 
top. Linnie Busby, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. Flor. 491. lt-c 



WANTED— To buy corn sheller 
with large fly wheel, either pow- 
er or electric. J. H. Grimes, 
Rlchwood, Ky. Tel. Wal. 678. lc 



FOR SALE— Good young work 
hores, work anywhere. Cheap. 
E. Y. Randall, Burlington, Ky., R. 
1. Tel. Burl. 357. 31-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road. This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf. 



WANTED— Tenant to tend 115 
acres, good land, Boone County; 
plenty water. Must have team, 
tools and sufficient help to raise, 
4^2 acres of tobacco, 15 acres corn 
15 acres hay; milk cows optional. 
E. Scherf, 860 Dixie Highway, Er- 
langer, Ky. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE— 20 ewes with lambs; 
also 2 Shorthorn bulls. J. B. Wal- 
ton, Burlington, Ky. lt-c 



FOR SALE— 1 Kalamazoo kitchen 
range, with warming closet and 
reservoir; porcelain top kitchen 
cabinet; table, 6 chairs; one buf- 
fet with mirror. H R. Parker, 
Erlanger, Ky., R. 4, Mt. Zlon Rd. 
Tel. Flor. 593. lt-c 



BOONE CO. FARMS 



I 



54 ACRES — 1 mile from Burlington, on Highway 18, 1.8-acre = 

tobacco base; 5-room house, electric, furnace, water In i 

: . kitchen, sink, barn, meat house, crib, 2 poultry houses; i 

twd-thirds tractor land •. . . ^ $6000.00 E5 

s= 295 ACRES— Highway 20, at Petersburg, overlooking Ohio = 

Rivet and the towns of Petersburg, Lawrenceburg, and — 

Aurora. A beautiful view of 15 miles ofrthe river. 2y 2 =: 

= miles from either the Lawrenceburg or Aurora ferries; = 

3 ponds, several never failing springs; stone pillared = 

S ' entrance; winding drive through large yard with =5 

trees; 10-room house, electric, S-'barns, good 5-room = 

tenjant house. Age compels selling. Owner will accept 1 = 

one-third cash, balance $1000.00 per year, 4 percent : 

interest. 4:4 acres tobacco base. Buildingsjworth more : 

than half the price of farm. $65.00 per acre. Try to i 
beat it for the price. i 

100 ACRES^-l-room house, 2 barns, electric. The tobacco crop SEE 

= this year sold for over $2000.00 $6000 00 = 

== 130 ACRES-M>n Ohio River, 3.2 acres tobacco base, fl-room = 

hoase, 3-room house, 3 barns, silo.- $8500.00 5 

s= 142 ACRES-k>hio River, all bottom land of best quality; 5- = 

room house, basement, furnace, bath; 2 large barns, = 

large crib T -..$21,000.00 3 

50 ACRES-r-1% miles from Burlington on blacktop road; barn; 

e- no house „ . . $3500.00 = 

== 132 ACRE3-T-1 mile from Burlington, about 20 acres in good 55 

bearing apple orchard. All level tractor land; 5-room 55 

= house, electric, 2 good barns. Well fenced; 2 ponds. 55 

= In «one family over 100 years $13,000.00 5s 

ss 131 ACRES — West of Union, 3.6 acres tobacco base; 3-room '• 

= house, electric, large dairy barn * $6850.00 == 

= 15014 ACRES— West of Union, 5 acres tobacco base; 6-room == 

zs: house, 3-room tenant house, dairy and tobacco barn; = 

stanchions for 16 cows; other buildlngsr $8000.00 i 

as 174 ACRES — 3 acres tobacco base; not a good location; old i 

house; well watered, good land $4500.00 I 

All of these farms can be financed. 

I A. B. RENAKER ■ 



r= TEL. OFFICE 12 



BURLINGTON, KY. 
J. G. SMITH, 83 



RES. 55 55 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllll 



TOBACCO PLANTERS — Tractor 
discs and plows, corn planters 
and cultivators. Various other 
equipment. Vlolett's, Route 17, 
Madison Pike, Flskburg, Ky. lp 

FOR SALE— Thirty head of sheep, 
12 head of these are young sheep 
with eight lambs. Price $200.00. 
Raymond Goodridge, Burlington, 
Ky. Tel. 467. lt-p 



FOR SALE — Fresh cows. Howard 
Bregel, 1 mile past New Haven 
School, U. S. 42. 31-2t-c 



FOR SALE— 1 Oliver riding culti- 
vator; 1 -horse corn drill; Oliver 
20 breaking plow. R. L. Wilson, 
Union, -Ky. Tel. Flor. 75L 31-2p 



FOR SALE OR TRADE — Four 
building lots, located in Carp- 
enter subdivision, Florence. Price 
$500 or will trade for cows or 
heifers. R. E. Eubanks, Ludlow, 
Ky., R. 2. 31-8t-pd. 



FOR SALE— Small size tricycle. 
Elizabeth Goodridge Nestor, Flor- 
ence, Ky. lt-c 

WANTED— Delco light plant with 
batteries. Dean Bloss, Burlington 
School House. lt-p 



FOR SALE— 'Registered Duroc-Jer- 
sey sow and 6 forty-pound pigs. 
Mrs. R. J. Akin, Burlington, Ky., 
R. 1. lt-p 



WANTED— Man and wife to oper- 
ate farm on East Bend road. 
Mary E. Casey, Burlington, Ken- 
tucky. , 30-2-p 



FOR SALE— Stayman Winesap 
apples. Bring basket. Wm. H. 
Moore, Hebron, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
115. 30-3t-c 



FOR SALE— Two bird dogs, point- 
ers. Mrs. S. B. Faulkner, Hebron, 
Ky. Tel. 175. 30-3t-c. 



WARNER'S GOLD EN BURLEY TO- 
BACCO SEED at Gulley and 
Petti t's, Burlington; B. F. Elliott, 
Walton; Walter Renaker, Verona 
or by mail. $1.50 per oz, 75c per 
y 2 oz. Clay Bedford, Cynthlana, 
Ky. 29-4t-c 



FOR WELL DRILLING— Call or 
write Hubert Farris, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Work guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 



HAULING— Specializing in live- 
stock. Call Dixie 7098, ask for 
Carl. 23-tf 



INCREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. Pullorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. sired matlngs. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



LOST— A and B gasoline' , coupons 
with license number 47-780. Ivan 
Ryle, Burlington, Ky., R. 2. 31-2p 



LOST— Fox terrier^ dog, white with 
brown spots; belongs to boy now 
in the service and we would like 
to have him returned. Kelly 
Martin, Burlington, Ky., R. 2. lp 



WANTED — Tenant for large farm, 
3y 2 -acre tobacco base, 10 acres 
of corn, several cows; all tools 
furnished. Must have reference. 
State age. Apply Post Office Box 
343, Covlrtgton, Ky.* „ lt-c 



FOR SALE— Several bred gilts to 
farrow In March and April. H. 
M. Holladay, Idlewild, Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Team of sorrel horses, 
well broke, weigh 1200 lbs., 4 and 
5 years old; also light brood 
mare, 9 years old. Will sell or 
trade. B. W. Brink, U, S. 44, 1 
mile south of New Haven School 
building. 31-2t-c. 



« 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm 
on shares. Tenant to furnish 
work stock and tools. Reference 
required. J. H. Huey, Petersburg, 
Ky. Tel. Burl. 238. 24-tf. 

TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W. M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington- COlonial 1121. tf . 



BE SAFE— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

Dining: Room Suites 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike fa Cev. Co. 1750 



■MMMM 







The Boone 




unty 



ESTABL ISHED 1875 

1 »"' 



VOLUME «9 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February 



FLORENCE YOUTH 
REPORTED KILLED 



TWO REPOBVJBD MISSI NG AND 
ONE WOUNDED WHILE SERV- 
ING COUNTRY WITH 
ARMY OVERSEAS. 






Names Placed 
On Framed List Of Hospital 




Tech. 5 Raymond Qettys, 21, son 
of Mr, and Mrs. Arthur Gettys, of 
Florence wai reported by the War 
Department as, killed In action 
January 12th In the fighting in 
Germany, according to a report re- 
ceived by hi* parents. 

Tech. Gettys was with an Infan- 
try unit, having entered the ser- 
vice two year* ago and had been 
overseas for a year. 

Pfc. Charles E. Craaaocs, son oi 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Cradddck of 
Union has been reported missing 
In action since January 4th, ac- 
cording to a telegram received by 
his parents, dated January 29. 

Pfc Craddock entered the service 
August lOtih, 1943 and toad been 
overseas approximately 4 months. 
He was attached to a Parachute 
Division. 

The- telegram from the War De- 
nartment follows: . 

^-The Secretary of War desires 
me to express his deep regret that 
your son Pfc Charles E. Craddock 
has been reported missing in action 
since January 4th to Belgium. If 
further details or other informa- 
tion are received you will be 
promptly notified.— J. A. Ulio. Adj. 
Gen." 

John W. Doan, of Union receiv- 
ed telegram from the.War Depart- 
ment stating that his foster son, 
OdI Connie G. Stutsman, 31 was 
missing in action in Germany since 
December 18th. 
The telegram received by Mr. 

Doan follows: 

The Secretary of War desires me 
to express his deep regret that 
Pvt. Cornelius G. Stutzman has 
been reported missing in action 18 
December, Luxembourg. If further 
details or dttxer information- are- ** 
received, you will be promptly no- 
tified.— UUo, Adj. General." 

Pfc. Cecil B. Shields, husband of 
Mrs. Mae Shields, of Burlington R. 
1 has been officially reported by 
the War Department as wounded 
In action in the^European theater 
of war. 

Pvt. Gordon Wagner, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Luther Wagner, of Union, 
was wounded In action while sor- 
ting with the Ninth Army in Bel- 
glum, according to a War Depart- 
ment telegram received by his f am- 



Foiir more names have been 
added to the framed list of partic- 
ipating organizations, on display 
In the Day Room at the AAF Con- 
valescent Hospital, Ft. Thomas, 
which Boone County has furnish- 
ed. These recent additions are: 
Boone County Junior Red Cross, 
W. M. 8. Grant Baptist Church, 
Verona Homemakers' Club, and 
Belleview School Club. 

A number of individuals also 
have helped in this project, either 
by donating articles or their ser- 
vices. The to date includes: Miss 
Mary Hood Glllaspie, Mrs. John L. 
Vest, Mrs. C. L. Cropper, Mrs. Ver- 
non Pope, Mrs. Joseph Huey, Mrs. 
Herbert Snyder,. Mrs. Harry May, 
Mrs. John Schram, Mrs. Louis 



LOCAL FARMERS TO 
BE PLACED ON ROLL 



OF TON PER ACRE CLUB— THREE 
FARMERS REPORT ON NUM- 
BER OF POUNDS GROWN 
ACRE. 



Fanners who secured a ton or 
more tobacco per acre from their 
1944 crop will receive special recog- 
nition, according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. Names of farmers 
who reach this goal will be placed 
on a special club roll at the coun- 
ty office provided they will give 
the acres grown, pounds sold, fert- 
ilize* practices used and variety 
jrrown. 



WILL APPEAR AT NEW HAVEN SCHOOL 






«»vtv 



Jake Cleek, Mrs. A. E. Hue, Sonny nelp otftier farmers study Improved 
Combs, Gayle Rouse, Mrs. A^B^production practices needed" under 



Renaker, Raymond Gross, Bh» 



Poston, Jake Cleek, A. B. Renakar, pl0te reports indicate that grow 

Mrs. Henna Matthews, Miss Cletff- M 

entine Walton, Mrs. Chester Taf%- 

ner, Mrs. Alice Schneider, Mrs. 

Clara Hensley and Mrs. Etna Mc- 

Neely. ;<> 

An electric corn popper has been 
donated for the Boone County 
room by Mrs. J. J. Maurer, but if 
others are available, there is still 
need for them in other parts of the 
hospital. Other articles still need 
ed are: Musical Instruments, small 
cameras, dark room equipment, old' 
electric irons, fans, radios, motors, 
scrap leather and soldering irons. 

Anyone having articles to donate 
please call Mrs. W. M. Townsend, 
Burlington 58, Chairman Camp and 
Hospital Committee. 



present demands. Present tocom- 



VICTORY GARDEN 
INCREASE ASKED 



HOME GARDENERS PRODUCED 
OVER 40 PERCENT OF FRESH 
VEGETABLES IN 1944— NOW IS 
TIME TO MAKE riANS. 







UH1 NMHCIH rTOmOTEO 

To lank Of 



Carl F. Rudicill, bioKbsr of Wm. 
'Rndlcill, of Burlington jma pro- 
moted from the rank of a Staff, 
Sergeant to a Second Lieutenant 
to the U. 8. Army, according to re- 
ports received here. 

Lt. Rudicill received his pramo- 
tion while serving in the Persian 
Gulf Command to Iran. 

He has been overseas since De- 
cember 1942 and has played an Jm- 
iportant role to moving more than 
4,750,000 tons of war supplies to 
the Russian Army through the Per 
slan Corridor. He won the gold 
bars after serving for many months 
as assistant enginehouse foreman. 

Carl Is well known to Boone 
County, having made bis home at 
Walton, graduating from the Wal- 
ton High School and resided for 



"BROWNOUT" WILL 
BE ENFORCED HOE 



NAMENTAL UOTPfB — TO 
CONSERVE ELECTRiCrTY. 



To conserve coal and other war- 
scarce fuels used in power gener- 
ation, the War Production Board 
has issued Utilities Order U-9 pro- 
hmlting certain uses of electricity, 
as enumerated below. Although 
there Is no shortage- at aVctrtea l 
generating capacity, acc umu late d 
deficits to fuel production have 
necessitated a tightening up of the 
nation's overall wartime fuel con- 
.servatlon program, and tins order 



Bert Lay ne and Hi s Hillbilly Band 



V* "»•»» 



ily. . ... 

He recently was decorated witn 
the Infantryman's Combat Badge. 



Miss Mary Phillips, of Lawrence- 
burg, Ind., spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Aylor. 



Former Walton Girl Honored 

Miss Nancy Sue White .jlaughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank White, of 
East Alton, HI., Is one of the stu- 
dents of Shurtleff College to re- 
ceive recognition for superior 
academic attainment as recognized 
hv h»ing placed on the Dean's list. 
To "be placed on this list Miss 
White made a point average of 2.33 
out of a possible 3.00 for the last 
quarter. £ 

TEN HOMEMAKERS 
ATTENDING MEET 



HELD AT UNIVERSITY OF 
KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, JAN- 
UARY SO THRU FEBRUARY 
2ND. 



Homemakers ( representing seven 
clubs in Boone 'County are attend- 
ing Farm and Home Convention. 
The annual State Farm and Home 
Week, January 30-February 2, Is 
toeing held at the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington. . Homemakers 
are attending the Women's Sec- 
tion in Memorial Hall. 

The two voting delegates, Mrs. 
Leo Flynn and Mrs. Vernon Pope, 
are attending the business meet- 
ings of the Kentucky Federation 
of Homemakers. 

Those attending from Boone 
County are: Mrs. Gilbert Dol wick, 
Constance; Mrs. John Martin, 
Florence; Mrs. Vernon Pope and 
Mrs? R. C. Garrison, Burlington; 
Mrs. Jake Cleek and Mrs. Mattie 
Orifmv. New Hrvoti: Mrs. Leo 
Flynn and Mrs. Wendall Rouse, 
Walton; Mrs. Joe Rouse, Verona, 
and Mary Hood Glllaspie, Home 
Demonstration Agent. 



The wartime victory garden pro- 
gram for 1945 calls for 10 percent 
Increase over 1944. Home garden- 
ers produced over 40 percent of 
fresh vegetables In 1944. 

The security of our food supply 
depends on the continued efforts 
of victory gardeners. At a recent 
meeting of garden leaders from 
many parts of the country, War 
Food Administrator, Marvin Jones, 
said: "Food Is Just as necessary as 
guns, tanks, and planes." * 

The main reasons for growing 
vegetables last year were: (1) to 
help the war; (2) to get better 
vegetables and (3) to save money. 
Other reasons people may give for 
raising a garden In 1945 are: ,(1) 
Grow your own and play safe 
concerning ration and food trans- 
portation difficulties; (2) build 
your health through outdoor exer- 
cise and eating plenty of fresh 
vitamin rich vegetables and (3) 
home grown fruits and vegetables 
have a better flavor; shopworn 
vegetables may lack tile savor and 
appeal of the garden fresh product. 

Now Is the time for gardeners to 
make plans so that when the 
proper weather comes, they can 
become active on the garden front. 
Gardeners have learned in 1943 
and 1944- that the land must be fit, 
or capable of being made so with 
the right fertilizer. They learned 
that pests need to be fought. 

The new University bulletin, 
"The Garden Month by Month" 
may be obtained at the County or 
Home Agents' Office. 

livestock Meeting 

Planned February 8 

The livestock marketing outlook 
meeting planned to cooperation 



era are not only able to produce 
more tobacco per acre but are able 
to produce it at relatively less lab- 
or. and cost per pound. 

Growers who reported the past 
week a ton or more tobacco per 
acre included the following: 

1. 3.^Q. Pennington, Walton, 2073 
pounds or 6220 pounds on three 
acres; variety 41- A. Fertilizer used 

acre: (a) Turned under 
wheat and vetch; (to) 30 loads of 
manure; (c) 1500 pounds of phos- 
phate; (4) 600 pounds of complete 
fertilizer. 

2. O. W. Cleek and Robert Slay- 
back, Walton, 2208 pounds per 
acre; variety 41 -A. Fertilizers used: 
(a) 18 loads of manure; (bi 700 
pounds of complete fertilizer; (c) 
900 pounds of phosphate; (d) turn- 
ed under rye and vetch. • 

3. John Worthlngton, Verona, 
2262 pounds per acre; variety Gold- 
en Burley. Fertilizers used: (a) 30 
loads of manure; (to) 500 pounds 
of phosphate; (c) 1000 pounds of 
complete fertilizer; (d) turned 
under rye and vetch. 

A. B. Renaker, Burlington, .re- 
port* 634 pounds from two tenths 
of an acre. This crop averaged 
3170 pounds per acre. Rye and 
vetch were turned under, and fert- 
ilizer applied at hte acre rate as 
follows: 1000 pounds phosphate, 
1000 pounds of complete fertilizer, 
250 pounds of ammonium nitrate, 

Not more than 400 pounds of 
complete fertilizer was applied be- 
side the row in any of the above 
cases. The other fertilizer to 
most Instances was applied to the 
green manure crop and turned 
under. 

There are many othec farmers 
who have been reported as secur- 
ing a ton or more of tobacco per 
acre. Several high yielding crops 
have not yet been sold. It Is hoped 
these will be reported to the Coun- 
ty Agent's office at an early date 
so that analysis of improved pro- 
duction practices can be made. 



Homemakers To Study . 
Homemaking In February 



Bert Layne And Company 
To Appear At New Haven 



:c~: »'•—■•* «»«♦*» >»<■ Vwothmr in liur-Mis one of a scries of steps b** n g 



Training to selecting attractive 
and interesting room combinations 
will be given at. Ideal homemakers 
meetings to February. Homemak- 
ers will be shown methods of mak- 
ing rooms attractive by making 
small or large changes to the room. 
This will be the first in a series 
of three home furnishings lessons 
for this spring. 

Reports on Farm and Home 
Week and a discussion on wrap- 
ping home cured meat also will be 
given at February meetings, ac- 
cording to Mary Hood Glllaspie, 
Home Demonstration Agent. 

Boone Countians are invited to 
attend any of the following meet- 
ings: ' 
Feb. 6, Verona, 10:30 CWT. 
Feb. 7, Constance, Mrs. John Dol- 
wick, 10:30. / 

Feb. 8, Petersburg, Mrs. W. O. 
Rector, 10:30. ^ 

Feb. 9, Waiton, Mrs. JohnnirDe-> 
moisey, 11:00. 

Feb. 14, Hebron.-Mrs.AUce Sch- 
neider, forsov 

Feb. 15, Burlington, courthouse, 
11:00. 

Feb. 15, Bullittsville, Mrs. Huey 
Aylor, 11:00. 

Feb. 16, Florence, Town Hall, 
10:30 a. m. 

Feb. 20, New Haven, Mrs. Jake 
Cleek, 11:00. a. m. 
Feb. 22, Taylorsport, 10:30. 
Feb. 28, Rabbit Hash, 11:00. 
Feb. 14, Walton Colored Club at 
8:00 p. m. 

Rev. T. 0. Harrison 

•Promoted To Captain 



A program will be given at the 
New Haven high school, Monday 
night, February 5th at 8 p. m. for 
the benefit of the Infantile Par- 
alysis Drive. This is an opportun- 
ity for the citizens of Union and 
vicinity to help do their share to 
this drive. 

Bert Layne and his boys will give 
two hours of grand entertainment. 
The proceeds will go toward this 
worthy cause. 

Because of weather conditions 
this program was delayed in order 
that a larger,, number might help 
to this campaign. 

The committee is composed of 
Mrs. Ed Grater, chairman, Mrs. H. 
R. Anderson, Mrs. N. R. Laibley, 
Mrs. H. Krrby and Mrs Ray New- 
man. 



lington. He entered the service 
June 13, 1941. *-* 

Gold ban symbolic of ran* wart 
pinned on Rudicill by Oeneml 
Booth and Colonel Mattson. follow- 
ing oath-taking ceremonies con- 
ducted by Ma}. Lewis M. Kill! 
Adjutant of MRS headqua 
Camp Atterbury, Teheran. 

His many friends in Boone Coun- 
ty wish him continued success to 
his line of duty. 



Ullan, 

irtfers 



NEW HAVEN F-T. A TO MEET 

The New Haven P. T. A. will meet 
at the school on Tuesday February 
13th at 8:00 p. m., it was announc- 
ed this week. Moving pictures 
showing the wdrks of the OPA will 
be enjoyed by those attending the 
meeting. 

All members are urged to be 
present at this meeting. 



LOCAL FIREMEN 
NAME OFFICERS 



$ 



taken to carry ow*. uu» wiwuw. 

Effective February 1, 1945 no 
electricity may be used for the 
following purposes*, awarding to A 
statement issued by the Communi- 
ty Public Service Company: 

1. Outdoor advextMac and out- 
door promotional lighting. 

1 Outdoor display lighting ex- 
cept where neeeasaxy tor the eon- 
duct of the business of outdoor 
establishments. 

3. Outdoor- Outdoor decorative 
and outdoor ornamental lighting. . 

A Show window lighting except 
where necessary for interior illum- 
ination. 

5. Marquee lighting to excess of 
60 watts for each marquee. 

6. White way street 
excess of the amount det 
local public authority to be 
sary for ptAIic safety. 

7. Outdoor sign lighting 1 
for: 

(a) Directional or identification 
signs niawlniil for fire and police 
protection, traffic control, trans- 
portation terminals or h o s pi tals; 
or directional or identification 
signs for any similar essential pub- 




BAT 

PUT IN FORCE. 



Mrs. Minnie Hill Sellers 



Danville Lee Aylor 

Danville Lee Aylor, age 9 months nmNTEM CRT- "• «rriees the lighting of widen 

died early Tuesday, January 30th ATI REGULAR ' "^^Ji, specifically certified to be neca- 
at General Hospital, Cincinnati, «G AT ^REHOUSE Of MgW- _ , M ,„ 

after an Illness of three days. 

He is survived by his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. William Aylor> one broth- 
er Jerry Wesley Aylor; grandpar- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Aylor 
of Covington, Mr. and Mrs. Omer 
Black, Union; Mr and Mrs. J. W. 
Aylor of Big Bone; Mrs. Anna Ed- 
wards, of Covington. 

Fun^TM* services will be held tc- 
day (Thursday) at 2:00 at the Big 
Bone Baptist Church. Burial will 
be to Big Bone Cemetery. 

Tharp and Stith, Florence funer 
al directors were in charge of ar 
rangements. 



with the Cincinnati Producers 
Livestock Commission Association 
will be held at Burlington court- 
house at 1:30 p. m., Thursday, Feb- 
ruary 8th. 

The meeting will include a pre- 
sentation of the 1945 livestock out- 
look by G. P. Summers of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, Lexington, live-* 
stock marketing discussions by 
stock yards salesmen and pre- 
sentation of commission refund 
checks by Producers' Association. 
The meeting is of a general edu- 
cational nature and all farmers 
are invited to attend. 



Mrs. Minnie Hill Sellers, 60, a 
native of Harrison county, died 
Saturday at home of her son, Wil- 
liam Hill near Burlington, after a 
brief illness. 

She Is survived by her husband, 
Harvey Sellers; hef parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. I. W. Lemons, of Cyn- 
thlana; five sons Orville Hill, of 
Cincinnati, William Hill of Burling- 
ton and James Hill, boatswain first 
class, with the Coast Guard; one 
daughter, Mrs. Ralph Steele, of 
Cincinnati; three stepsons, William 
and James Sellers and Pvt. Ed- 
ward Sellers; three stepdaughters, 
Mrs. Dlllard Engle, Mrs. Willard 
Allen and Mrs. Ruth Sullivan; four 
sisters, Mrs. Harvey Browning and 
Mrs. Russell Whalen, both of Cyn- 
thlana, Mrs. Lang Rankin, of Cov- 
ington and Mrs. Flem Rankin, of 
Livingston, Ky., and one brother, 
George Lemons. 

Funeral services were conducted 
at 11 a. m. Monday at the resld- 



Chaplaln Thomas O. Harrison, 
former pastor of the Burlington 
Methodist Church, who has been 
stationed at Fort Benntog, Ga., has 
left for overseas duty. Chaplain 
Harrison was recently promoted to 
the rank of Captain In the Army of 
the United States. 

His new address is: Ch. T. O. 
Harrison, 0508690, 5th Inf., APO 
360, care Postmaster, New York, N. 
Y. 



ORGANIZATION 
MEETING SET 



FOR PURPOSE OF PROMOTING 
LOCAL CHAPTER OF NATION- 
AL AERONAUTIC ASSOCIA 
TION. . , 



A group, composed of northern 
Kentucklans interesting; in pro- 
moting* the organization of a local 
chapter of the National Aero- 
nautic Association wttl meet to the 



Mrs. Theresa M. McWethy 



Mrs. Theresa McNeely McWethy, 
83, widow of Stephen McWethy, 
died at her home to Petauburg, 
Tuesday, following a long illness. 

Funeral services were held Wed- 
nesday at 3 p. m. from the Peters- 
burg Christian Church. 

She is survived by three sons, 
Milton, of Petersburg, Claude, of 
Lawrencaburg, Ind., and Elmer Mc- 
Wethy, of Memphis, Tenn. 



Chamber of Commerce Bulldingf* con te S ts this season. 



Fourth and Monmouth Streets, 



Good Average Reported 

A. J. Ogden, of* Llmaburg, reports 
the sale of 1560 pounds of tobacco 
which brought a total of $813.28. 
Mr. Ogden was •well pleased with 
the sale. 



ence by the Rev. W. H. Gordon. Newport, Friday, February 9, at 8 
Burial was In Battle Grove Cem-»- 

etery. 

" ! ' 

Boone County Farm 

Meetings Are Planned 

i Farmers through community ag- 
ricultural programs have planned 
for county meetings during 
February, on dairy, tobacco, hogs, 
farm crops, soils and trucks crops, 
according to H. R. Forkner, Coun- 
ty Agent. Specialists from the 
Experiment Station will be secur 
ed to lead the discussions Jajt these 



Hebron Cagers Tain 

Tift From Walton Five 

Hebron's hoopsters won a hard 
fought game Wednesday night of 
last week from Walton by a score 
of 29-19 on the Walton floor. 

Hebron took an early lead in the 
game and maintained a margin 
throughout. Scores by quarters 
were 5-2, 11-5, 19-9 and 29-19 
Masters and Buckler each collected 
ten ponts for the winners, while 
Wynn had seven and Gephart had 
six for the losers. 

In a preliminary game Hebron 
also emerged on the long end of 
22-13 count. 

Hebron has won six out of 10 



p. m., according to an announce 
ment made this week 

Invitations are being sent to 
civic and industrial organizations, 
luncheon clubs, members of the 
Kenton CoUnty Airport Board, the 
Kentucky Aeronautics Commission, 
veterans organizations, schools, 
city and county officials, asking 
them to send representatives to 
the meeting. 

It has been suggested by the 
officers of .the National Aeronautic 
Association, owing to war condl 
tions existing at the present time 
that one chapter be organized In 
the Fifth Congressional District; 
that monthly meetings be held and 



meetings. - 

Lynn Copeland has been secured that such meetogs be held to dif- 

for the dairy meeting which has terent parts of the district, 

been set for February 28th. The Boom. Gountgi has fccci; Invited 

dates for the other meetings will to participate to the organization 

be announced as soon as speaker of the chapter and to attend the 

dates can be arranged. Newport meeting. 



Florence took the Burlington 
Eagles to camp Tuesday of fiat 
week when they emerged dn the' 
long end of 37-33 count on the 
Florence floor. The score by quart- 
ers was 7-7, 15-21, 23-28, 3»-37. 

Pressor was high point man for 
Burlington with 15 closely follow- 
ed by Benson who collected 12. 
Anion led the attack for the Flor- 
ence Knights with 14. 

In a preliminary game Florence 
reserves trounced the Burlington 
second string men by a 37-18 count. 

Hebron's hoopsters gave the Bur- 
lington five a set back Friday 
night on the Hebron floor when 
they trimmed the visitors by a 
score of 43-15. 

Benson was high point man fox 
Burlington with six, while Step- 
hens led the attack for Hebron 

In a preliminary game Hebron 



The regular monthly meeting of 
the Burlington Volunteer Fire De- 
partment was held at the f Irehouse 
on Monday night with seventeen 
members present. 

The new officials of the depart- 
ment were read by Frank Mllburn, 
Chairman of the Board of Direct- 
ors. They were Frank Mllburn, W. 
C. Brown, and Robert Clore, direct- 
ors; A. E. Stephens, Chief; E. M. 
Poston, Assistant Chief; Justin 
Dolph and Albert Kirkpatrlck, 
Captains; J. K. Cropper, Sam Ryle 
and Luther Smith, Lieutenants 
and J. K. Cropper was made secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

It was decided that the siren 
would be sounded on each regular 
meeting night at 7:15 in ordep to 
remind the firemen of the meet- 
ing at 7:30 p. m. This signal will 
be one short blast and should not 
be confused with the fire alarm 
which Is always four or more 
blasts. 

Luther Smith was named prop- 
erty officer to be to charge of the 
O. C. D. equipment and will be 
bonded to the amount of $5,000.00 
to perform his duties. 

The attendance of the firemen 
at regular meetings was brought 
to an open discussion and it was 
definitely decided that to order 
for a man to be on the active 
membership list lt will be neces- 
sary that he attend regularly, and 
not be absd&t more than three 
consecutive £ meetings without a 
good reason. All persons not meet- 
ing these requirements must sur- 
render their badge and active 
membership to someone on the 
waiting list who are anxious to 
take part' to the Volunteer De- 
partment. 

Several other matters of busi- 
ness were held over until the Feb- 
ruary meeting which will be on 
Monday night, February 28th at 
7:30 p. m. The meeting was ad- 
journed at 0:15. 



sary by local public i 

(b) Directional or Identification 
signs using not more than 00 watts 
per establishment, for doctors and 
for hotels, and other public lodg- 
ing establishments. 

The .War Production Board has 
requested immediate compliance to 
eliminating the above prohibited 
uses of electricity. Although the 
order applies specifically to out- 
door commercial and municipal 
lighting, the WPB also urges you 
to practice maximum conserva- 
tion to other uses of electricity. 
Remember, when you waste elec- 
tricity you waste vital fuel, man- 
power and transportation f acil it i e s. 
Use what you need, but need what 
you use. 



Paper Drive Sponsored 
:> By Homemakers' Cmb 

The Burlington Homemakers are 
sponsoring a waste paper drive 
February 1 to Feb. 7 inclusive. 
Those having paper, are asked to 
tie It to bundles and leave to the 
shed at J. O. Smith's. 

There Is a critical shortage of 
paper— save every scrap. 

Mrs. C. G. Kelry and Mrs. J. «. 
Smith are members of the com- 
mittee, and will appreciate your 
cooperation. Remember the dates 
February 1 to Feb. 7. 



FARM BUREAU 
BANQUET FEB. 23 



RESERVATIONS MADE TO 
TWO HUNDRED 
SPECIAL 

ON 



New Hawen P.-T. JL 

Will Present Way 



The New Haven P.-T. A. will pre- 
sent a play entitled "The Absent 
Minded Bridegroom" at the school 
auditorium on Friday, February 
10th. 

This la a good Irish comedy 
which gives a real Insight Into 
Irish-American life. The charact- 
ers are well chosen from members 
of the P.-T. A. This play promises 
a full evening, of fun and first 
class entertainment 

A full dew.riptfnn of the F>ay 
and the character sketch will ap- 



The annual Boone County Farm 
Bureau banquet will be held at 
Burlington, Friday, February 23d. 
according to Walter King, presi- 
dent. Reservations are being made 
with the Burlington P.-T. A. to 
serve 200. 

Rube Proctor, Owanton, Assistant 
State Farm Bureau secretary and 
Mrs. Alan Wilson of, Cave City, 
secretary of the Associated Woman 
of the Kentucky Farm Bureau 
Federation, will be guest speaiara, 
Representatives from Grant, Gall- 
atin, and Campbell County Farm 
Bureaus will also be on the pro- 
gram. 

Tickets may be secured from di- 
rectors or at any of the county 
agricultural offices. 



reserves Von over'the - visitors by a I pear to next week's Issue of 
score of 30-1J. Recorder. Watch for it! 



M^ t.h. -y an-..-!. <%r rn.. 
spent the weak and with bar moth 
ar, Mrs. Lavtoa Klrkpatrtek 
family. 



* 






nUKSDAY, FBBRCAKT 1, IMS 



TBI BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



I 



ftflDEE COUNTY RECORDER 



and Owne 



RAYMOND COMBS. 



Entered at the Post Office, Burlington, Ky., as Second Class Mall Matter 



Y THURSDAY 



25 words and under 50c. Over 25 



re ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN BOONS COUNTY 
AD VSRTI8INO INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per oC*wnn Inch. 
•OTICES AND CARDS CMr THANKS: 

word* $1.00. /"" 

M9LAS6IF1KD ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each 
word one cent eaefe/ AH classified ads. payable In advance 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; colum 
cms; column depth, 21 Inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rote , $1410 per Year 



AMERICAN PRESS 

Far Over Fifty Yean 



20 Years From Now 



KENTUCKY PRES! 
'AS SOCIATION , 

IfHT/FIJ nTOfYiMi 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FOEE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

." CAIL 

BURLINGTON 95 

We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 




walking up to get a diploma, or 
confidently marching in to get a 
Job, maybe walking up to an old 
church altar to meet a bride in 
white. (Or it may be the bride 
herself). Tour child may never 
thank you for good strong feet, 
he'll take them as a matter of fact. 
But what will he think if they're 
not good strong feet? Sure, he'll 
still love .you— hut "why didnt 
mother make sure I was growing 
up right?" 

It is a responsibility, Just one 
of the many a mother takes on 
when she brings a child into the 
world. — Adv. 



• N. TULCH 

Foot Comfort Specialist at — 

PEOPLE'S SHOE STORE 

814-816 . Madison, Covington 



HEBRON HONOR ROLL 

Eight Grade: John Carver, Helen 
Edwards, Betty Barlow, Donald 
Conrad, Harriet Jarboe, Eleanor 
Washmuth, Rilla Pepper, Marilyn 
Campbell, Martha Pfalzgraf, Helen 
Rogers, Galen McGlasson, Delores 
Scudder and Benny Turner. 

Seventh Grade: Betty Jean Ryle, 
Billie Cave, and Marilyn Helms, 
Jimmie Tanner, C. A. England, 
Raymond Mattox, and Eva Mae 
Setters. 

Sixth Grade — Donald Herbstreit, 
Paul Hogan, Bobby Bowman, Vir- 
ginia Cummins, Betty Jarboe and 
Joan Harrison. 

Fifth Grade: Billy Louis Good- 
ridge, Ronald Garnett, Carol Ann 
Asbury, Margie Masters, Vivian 
Cave, Maudie Floyd, Mary Lou Hill. 

Fourth Grade: Nina Bennett, 
Anna Elliott, Carlton Anderson, 
Kenneth Anderson and Barbara 
Schavier. 

Third Grade: Eddie Campbell, 
Artheda Meyers, Jane Rogers, 
Wayne Schneider, Betty Schwier 
and Bertha Sturgeon. 

Second Grade: Vera Mae Conrad, 
Nareta Joan Cave, Laverne Jergens 
and Mary Lou Utz. 

First Grade: Mickey Conner, 
Louis A. Crigler, Orval Johnson, 
Gary Purcel, Jimmie Popp, Marion 
Blaker, Betty England, Wanda 
Harris and Leora Willoughby. 



Go To Church 



BELLEYIBW BA1TIST CHURCH 
Rev. W. Goth, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. 
Morning worship 11:30 a. m. 
Evening worship at 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. 
Everyone la cordially invited to 
attend these services. 



FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Boot. Carter, Faster 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 a. m. First 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



Improved 
uniform international 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

BY HAROLD C. LUNDQUIST, D. D. 
Of Th« Moody Blbls Institute of CbleagO. 
RileaHd by WMttra Newspaper Onl««. • 

Lesson for February 4 



. L*Mon ««bjtcu and Scripture texU ••- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education : uied Oy 

permission. • 



Will they thank you for good 
strong feet? 

Oh, you mother of a child — you 
want his manners to be nice, you 
want his brain to be quick, you 
want his hands to agile — but 
don't you want his feet to be 
stury and true, well shaped and 
graceful? Are those of your 
daughter? 

You mother of a child, twenty 
years from now his feet will be 



k 



i IJr^ 

REMEMBERMEN 



— the Chautauqua pitched tent each 
summer? It dispensed education and 
entertainment in eapy doses for both 
young and old at convenient hours 
during the day and evening. That was ' 
before the movies captured America. 
Remember? V '^ 



CATHERMAN 
FUNERAL HOME 

Tel CO 2580 Ludlow, Ky. 



v«. 



Y*1*. 



'I 1 



■•ifi 



3BH 



Charlene Hollands of Marshall 
county has a flock of 70 Barred 
Rocks which returned $14.67 for 
the month of November above feed 
costs. 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. E. Henfechel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm of J. W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. " 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the' above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop] 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permahents $5.00 up 

Cold Wave 

Permanent $10.00 up 

Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 




illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllillllllllli- 

WASHERS REPAIRED I 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

WM. HAGEDORN 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. | 

!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1I1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIII|F 



gLIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliSSIIIIIIH 




I CHAMBERS & GRUBBS OFFER . . 



A service which the older residents of Boone County have . as 
known and respected for almost half a century — and which ass 
newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. = 



Chambers & Grubbs 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 





eiuchi. 



AD leading breeds 17. 8. 
Approved. Blood-tested, started chicks one, two and 
three weeks old. Prices right. Also Baud chicki. 
RREECATALOG.Write: KENTUCKY HATCHERY 
S*7 WWXfOUBXH STRUT • LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY 



[ fUNERj 

QHiilllllRUrll 



, WALTOIT 352 

HiHHmmiitmiiiiuiitiimanimHniiiiimiiiiHiiniimiiiiiiiniiiiiii^ 



BRING YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 

•For Full Price and Honest 

Weight 

Phone: HEmlock 6135 

W}11 contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Qllby 
Green Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

You are invited to come — wor- 
ship an * work with us. 

RICHWOOD PRESBYTERIAN 

CHURCH 
Milton A. Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedlnger, Supt. 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. » 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



<* -». 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Claude R. McDonald, Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. R. R. 
Witham, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



* JESUS' CONCERN FOR ALL 

LESSON TEXT— Matthew 9:1, 9-13, 18-JS. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Therefore all thlnff 
whatsoever ye would that men should do 
to you. do ye even so to them: for this Is 
the law and the prophets.— Matthew 7:13. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam S. Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 
Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT). 

Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 
). m. (CWT). 

Prayer services each Wednesday 
evening 8:30 (CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited to worship with 
us. 



BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. P 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Thursday'evening 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public is cordially invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, Pastor 

S. S. at 10:00 a. m. a Supt. Car 
roll Washhurn. 
Morning Worship 11 a. m. 
Evening Service at 8:00 p. m 



Prayer 
p. m. 



meeting Wednesday 7:30 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 
Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30, 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



What is a man worth? Well, say 
we, that depends, and then we are 
prone to undervalue him. Jesus had 
(and taught) a high regard for the 
inherent value of man. He saw pos- 
sibilities in all men. He had a love 
for them. He was concerned about 
their welfare, and they responded 
by an interest in Him. 

Jesus showefi by His dealings with 
men how wrong are most of the 
standards and attitudes of the world. 
With Him there were: 

I. No Social Barrier (w. 1, 9, 10). 
The caste system of some lands, 

dividing people into social strata 
which separate men and hinder fel- 
lowship, does not exist in our land. 
Yet, in practice, we have such lev- 
els which are a formidable barrier 
in the thinking of many (perhaps 
most) people. 

Jesus knew nothing of social bar- 
riers. He ignored them and went 
straight to the one in need. In. our 
lesson it was a man of position and 
wealth who was an outcast among 
his people because he was a hated 
gatherer of taxes for Rome. 

Jesus saw in him a man of faith 
and a useful witness jfor Him. 
And He not only talked with him, 
but called him to be His disciple. 
Then He 'went further and, to the 
astonishment of His critics, went In 
to a great feast where many such 
men were gathered. 

He ate with publicans and sinners, 
not because He approved of their 
manner of life, but because He want- 
ed to change it as He changed them. 

II. No Fear of Criticism (vv. 11-13). 
Many a kind and noble impulse 

has died a-borning because of the 
fear of criticism. "What will people 
say?" has kept many a Christian 
from speaking to some sinner about 
his (or her) soul. 

"The world is 1 too much with us—" 
and we all too often guide our lives 
and service by the possible reaction 
we may receive from those round 
about us. We did not learn such an 
attitude from Jesus. 

His answer to His critics made 
it clear that there will "be no self- 
righteous, "good enough" people 
in heaven. The Lord is not even 
calling them, so long as they trust 
in their own goodness. He came to 
seek and to save sinners (v. 13, and 
Luke 19:10). 

We, too, may go forward without 
fear of our critics. That doesn't 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Yancy Clore, de- 
ceased are requested to present 
eame properly proven according to 



law, and all persons indebted to 
the said estate are requested to 
call and settle with the undersign- 
ed. 

Charles Clore, 
32-2t-p Administrator 



mean that we "don't care what peo- 
Young Peoples meeting^ p. m.t &* think" about us. We ought to 



EAST REND BAPTIST CHURCH 
Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (CWT). Raymond Ashcraft, 
Supt. 

f reaching every iunJay at 11:30 
Evening Service at '<:*o tC.W.T.) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p.m. . 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 8:00. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 

BRETHREN 

Orion Krb&tign, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:80. 

You need your church. 



PETERSB URG M ETHODIST 
CHURCH 

Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pa stor 
Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT. 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m. 
B. T. U v '6:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. - 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. 

Morning Worship at 11:00. 

B. T. U. 6:45 (CWT) for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
7JOp.m, v % 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor • 

10:00 A. M. Sunday School 

11:00 A. M. Worship. 

7:30 P. M. B. T. U. 

5.00 P. M Evangelic lie Suivu;e. 

8:00 P. M. Wednesday, Prayer 
and Bible Sturdy." 

Third Monday night, men's meet- 
ing. 



care, but if their opinion is based 
on unbelief and self-righteousness, 
it should certainly not deter us from 
our all-important business of soul- 
winning. 

III. No Limitation of Time and 
Place (vv. 18-22). 

Often the help of man to those in 
need is circumscribed by so many 
regulations that those who most de- 
serve help cannot get tt. There are 
times and places for application 
forms, and tests must be completed, 
/etc. Doubtless much of this is need- 
ed, but one wonders at times wheth- 
er our charitable impulses have not 
disappeared under a mountain of 
red tape. s 

Be that as it may, how interesting 
it is to see that Jesus met the need 
when and where it appeared. He 
was already on one errand of mercy 
when the sick woman touched His 
robe. He was not too busy nor too 
preoccupied to stop and give her a 
word of help and comfort (v. 22). 

Is there not a significant lesson 
here for us in the church? The 
need is reason enough for the ex- 
tension of our help. The place is 
anywhere that men are in sadness 
or sorrow, and the hour is now— 
when they need our help. 

IV. No Lack of Power (w. 23-26). 
How often the human heart is 

prompted to help, and willing hands 
are ready to follow its promptings 
in loving action, yet we find ^hat we 
cannot do anything. The need is too 
great for our meager resources. Our 
strength does not suffice. We have 
no money, or the situation is one 
beyond human help. 

How wonderful it is then to re- 
member the Lord Jesus! A touch 
on the hem of His garment in faith 
made the woman whole (v. 22). A 
word from Him brought the dead 
little girl out to face the scorners 
of Jesus, in the bloom of life and 
health. 

Has He lost any of His great pow- 
er? No. He is just "the same yes- 
terday, and today, and forever" 
(Heb. 13 r8). Why not trust Him? 

Do you need help— spiritual, men- 
tal, physical? He is able. He has 
no prejudice regarding your social 
position. He will meet you right 
where you are, and right now. He 
is seeking the sick and the sinful— 
"the lost, the last, and the least*" 
Look to Him by faith. 

-The great Physician now Is near. 

The sympathizing Jesus: 
He speaks, the drooping heart to cheer; 

O hear the voice of Jesuit. 



liULLITTSVUAE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at li a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt 



• • 



To All M<Hnbers Of The Florence 
Building & Loan Association 



The Board of Directors of your Building 
and Loan Association appreciates the loan you 
have with them because you have been the means 
of this association growing from $24,000.00 in 
loans made at the end of Dec 1926, our first year 
of operation, to $155,800.00 in loans outstanding 
as of September 30, 1944. 

In order to keep in line with other building 
and loan associations, this Board of Directors 
has passed a resolution to reduce your interest to 
a 5% participation plan. In other words, on each 
$200.00 borrowed your interest will be 20c per 
week for 50 weeks in the year, or $10.00 per year 
on $200.00. The total of your weekly payment 
made on the other two weeks will all be credited 
to your principal. In addition you will continue 
to receive dividends on tne amount you have paid 
on the principal of your loan. 

This of course will make a considerable re- 
duction in our earnings or your earnings because 
these earnings are distributed to you and the de- 
positors as dividends. In order to offset this we 
hope to get more loans. That is where you can 
help. If you tell your friends or neighbors, when 
they'are planning to borrow on their homes or to 
purchase a home, to ask your building and loan 
association in Florence about their lending plan. 
You will not only be helping yourself by earning 
more dividends but you will be helping the com- 
munity by making your Association a bigger and 
better one. 

Respectfully yours. 



Florence Bldg. & Loan Association 

OSCEOLA C. LUCAS, Secretary 



CONTINUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER, 





MEMBER 
EDERAL HOME LC 
BANKS 



KENTUCKY 



New temporary location, next door, in former 
Bentler Drug Store building. 



3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope you will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIESnow? Reference: Ask 

the first man Ton meet. 






-« .. . %r^C. 



•?*!V 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



FULL CREDIT 



= given on 

ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION 



POIJCJES 



TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



= Phone ERL. 87 



Ambulance Service 

= 

in 



r 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP & STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 







A 



J 



SSSM 



SSBSM 



^^^^~ mmma ^~ mmmmimmmmmm 



( 



* 









THE BOONE COUTH* BMOtMB, TOsttDWlO*. KBCTCqtT 



Mtnmsa 



JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY 
DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES 

DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS 
Louden Dairy Bam Stalls-Stanchions 
Meyers Pumps and Water Systems 

HUDSON BROODERS and POULTRY 

EQUIPMENT 

Bring In Sheep Shearing Combs and Cutters 

To Be Sharpened 

FARM FENCING AND GATES' 

The Jansen Hardware Co. 



IMIUUIHttllMIHIIIIIUIIMIIIlll«lllimMMIt|cost of clothing, «Mch to ttoreat- 

iHiumi ^^ the Gov «M Ba «nt , » ewtire 

This Week In OPA aa ^ m> - 



CO. mm 



108-110 PIKE 



COVINGTON, KY. 




INCOME TAX SERVICE 

.Many taxpayers ask "Why should I bother about tax re- 
turns/Sinee my employer withholds my tax from my salary or 
wages?" The government may owe you a tax refund. 

There are three methods of determining which tax form 
is most economical for you to use. Don't guess which form suits 
you, consult one who knows. Reasonable fee. 



R. V. 

1 LLOYD AVE. 



NO 

Office Hours 8 to 9 p 



LENTS 

FLORENCE, KY. 



m. 



Phone Florence 118 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiii 

Point Valuta Announced 
The ration value of creamery 
butter will continue at 24 red 
points per pound in February, the 
OPA announced this week. 

Also continuing unchanged are 
consumer point values for all meats 
except a few previously point-free 
bacon items and fat pork cuts, 
which are now being given values 
of one point each. . '_; 

present point values for all pro- 
cessed foods for February continue 
unchanged. 

Present point values of two red 
points per pound for lard, short- 
ening and salad and cooking oils 
continue In effect. Also unchang- 
ed wuYbe present point values for 
all cheeses and canned milk. 

The ration value of margarine, 
however. wlH be increased to three 
red points per pound from the 
present two points per pound, ef- 
fective at 12:01 a. m., Sunday, 
January 28, 1945. 

The ration value of margarine Is 
being increased because lard, 
shortening, and salad and cooking 
oils are now rationed. This, will 
put additional strain on supplies 
of margarine,' which is used inter- 
changebaly in cooking. 

The higher margarine point 
value— one point per pound above 
lard, shortening and cooking oils- 
is designed to continue its avail- 
ability to purchasers who wish to 
use it as a bread spread. 

Clothing Program Proposed 
-Moving to halt the increase in 




JMXHXMXMXMXHXMXMXMXMXHXHXg 



NEW and CLEAN 

Used Furniture 




For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

ERLANGER KENTUCKY 



Madison Furniture 
Store 



anti-inflation program, the Office 
of Price Administration and the 
War Production Board this week 
laid down a program designed to 
channel a substantial proportion 
of the limited supply of fabrics 
available for civilian use Into the 
most essential low and medium 
priced apparel, and at the same 
time, bring about substantial re- 
ductions in the price of essential 
clothing. 

It was pointed out that this pro- 
gram will not increase the total 
supply of civilian clothing, but it 
will shift the emphasis from high- 
priced and non-essential garments 
to essential and lower-priced cloth- 
ing. 

The proposed program also is 
expected to reduce the currently 
Inflated clothing prices by six or 
seven per cent and to improve the 
quality of clothing for the price. 
Hurley Provision Announced 
Burley tobacco may now be 
bought direct from the grower pro- 
vided it is later graded and resold 
by the buyer on the warehouse 
floor, OPA said this week. 

This amendment, which be-: 
came effective January 20, 1945, 
also contains two other provisions 
that apply to the resale of tobacco 
bought on the warehouse floor. 

1. The tobacco, when bought on 
the warehouse floor and resold on 
the warehouse floor, cannot be 
mix*! with other tobacco or sub- 
divided into other lots or piles. 

2. The ceiling price at which the 
tobacco may be resold on the ware- 
house floor is the ceiling price that 
applied to the first sale of the to- 
bacco on the warehouse floor. 

New Food Stamps Announced 

Six more red stamps became 
good on January 28 for obtaining 
meats-fats, and five more blue 
stamps are good on February 1 for 
buying rationed canned goods, the 
OPA has announced. 

Blue stamps are validated on 
the first day of each calendar 
month. 

Red stamps are validated on the 
first day of each rationing period. 
Since the February rationing per- 
iod will last five weeks instead of 
four, beginning January 28 and 
ending March 3, six red stamps 
instead of five, given for four- 
week ration periods become good 
on January 28. 

Red stamps that will be good 
that day for meats-fats, each worth 
10 points— a total of 80 points- 
are Y-5, -5, A-2, B-2, C-2, and D-2. 

Blue stamps that will be good on 
February 1 for processed foods, 



each worth 10 points— a total of 
50 points— are H-2, J-J. K-2, L-*. 
and M-2. 
Onion Sets Regulation Revised 

Several limitations that disrupt 
trade practices On bulk sales of 
onion sets have been revised, OPA 
has announced. 

These revisions are In line with 
OPA's announced policy of correct- 
ing and simplifying its regulations 
in the interest Of better price con- 
trol, OPA said. 

The adjustments, effective Jan- 
uary 27, 1945, are as follows: 

1. The limitations fixed on quan- 
tity sales of onion sets are revised. 

2. A wholesale mark-up of 5 
cents per pound for sales up to 84 
pounds is provided. 

3. The definite of a wholesaler 
has been broadened to Include per- 
mitted sales by one wholesaler to 
another. 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 






The 

t Church Sunday, tlon of America 
good attendance I cows m the herd at the 
inclement weath-lal Experiment Station at 
ton produced more than 
pounds of milk each last fear 
best one produced 15,42» pmsW 
milk containing ,«* pownds of 
terfat and the lowest one produced 
12,086 pounds erf ml» *»** 
pounds of fat. They were nuikeo 
twice dairy. 



Root-rot resistant varieties of to- 
bacco and heavy fertilization are 
credited with giving Anderson 
county farmers their highest aver- 
age acre yield. 



Twenty-six attended services at 
Big Bone Baptist Church Sunday 
This was very 
considering the 
er. 

Bud Aylort baby is confined to 
Booth Memorial Hospital with dip- 
htheria. We pray for Its speedy 
recovery. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Delbert 
Hubbard on January 20th, a fine 
baby girl. Both mother and baby 
are doing nicely. 

It has been reported that Mrs. 
Grace Feldhaus Is expecting her 
son Blufe home, the latter part of 
this month. 

Brother Hogan and wife enter- 
tained at supper Friday evening, 
Clifford Route and wife and Bin 
Allen and wife. 

Mrs. Carrie Ogden Is expecting 
her daughter, Mrs. Delbert Hub- 
bard and baby home from the 
hospital, Tuesday. 



CHIBOPRATIC 



HOPPER 



Try A Want Ad— They Se..| 



ADAMS 

Covington, *y . 

: lt-l* A. ML, *-*, 1-9 1 

EXCEPT THURSDAYS 

DATS 

COlonial 0544 



432-434 
Covington, 



N 

£xHXHXH 



Madison Ave. 
-:- Kentucky 



hie Sale! 

IN ORDER TO SETTLE OWNERSHIP, f HE FOLLOWING 
PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD AT AUCTION, ON 



Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 

TRY OCR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining luster. We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 



mm 



.... 




Hour 
Eyes 

Eyestrain causes much dis- 
comfort. Let us carefully ex- 
amine your eyes and furnish 
glasses that eliminate eye- 
strain. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 




: 



AT 11:00 A.M. 

ON THE OLD DILLON FARM THREE MILES EAST OF ^RAB- 
BIT IIASH, JUST 'OFF THE RABBIT HASH ANDUNION RD. 

LIVE STOCK— 16 head sheep, 4 years and younger, ready to 
lamb; 18 head cow< heifers and* bull, Jerseys, Shorthorn and 
Black Angus, all purebred, some will freshen soon, probably by 
dale of sale; 4 horses, 13-year-old mare 1200 lbs, one coming J- 
year-old mare 1000 lbs., one aged mare 1200, one Western blacR 
and white pony 8 years old; 58 hogs, 7 brood sows, bred 2 weeks, 
1 male 350 lbs, 50 shoats, all these purebred spotted Poland 
China. ^1 

FEED — 100 bushels corn; some baled hay. 
FARMING EQUIPMENT— Truck wagon; disc harrow, Inter- 
nationals; Rastus plow; double shovel; one-horse jumper; three- 
horse riding plow; oil drum; 2-horse sled; 2 sets tug harness, 
halters; other small tools ; work bench. 

HOUSEHOLD*— Kitchen cabinet; Reliable cook range; 5-burner 
Perfection oil range; cherry cupboard, antique; table; safe; 2 
iron beds, etc. ■ ~ • 




lmiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimimmiiitiiiim 

New James 

— Theatre 



NEW SHOW TIME 

One Show Each Night at 7:3o CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 2:S0 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday ft Thurs. 



Tex Ritter, Fuzzy Knight, In 

OKLAHOMA RAIDERS 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1 



/ 



TERMS— CASH 



LUNCH AT NOON 



Don Ameche, Dana Andrews and 
William Etthe, in 

WING AND A PRAYER 

FRf. ft SAT., FEBRUARY 2 AND 3 



Katherine Hepburn, Walter Huston 
— in — 

DRAGON SEED 

SUNDAY FEBRUARY y>TH 



: ALBERT FELDHrUS & YALE 




Owners 

Auctioneers: WORTHINGTON and KIRTLEY 



1 t$( 



* 



Evelyn Ankers, J. Carrol Naish, in 

JUNGLE WOMAN 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH 



NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH 



NONE SHALL ESCAPE 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1TH 

lllllllllllllliiiiiillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



FOOT HURT? 

READ THIS. 

N . ».«« ... Mac ^"SiS JKZ25 Sir 

wffl straighten up youta, and restore foot end body 

balance. . 

Investigate Surgical Shoes, Prescription 
Shoes and Health Spot Shoes 

FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

FREE FOOT ANALYSIS 

DON'T SUFFER NEEDOSSLY 

Three Foot Comfort Specialist Will 

Analysis, Show i 

you how Feet! 

can be relieved. 

"See For Yourself 

i give you a Free 

The inside of Surgical and Prescription shoes 
are shaped to fit every curve of Your' Feet 

They support the Health Spot at the inner curreof your 
heels andrital Arch under the center line of your body 
weight. Because of this natural shape sndsnor **•» *£ 
heel, cannot roll In or out, weak *oe*are straightened to 
natural position, assuring foot comfort. 

PEOPLES SHOE STORE 

"Where Foot Comfort Begins" 
814-816 Madison Ave. Covington, Ky. 

Three Foot Comfort Specialists In Dairy Attendance 



AFr 



dLo 



Will Save You Money And Give 
You The Following Benefits: x 



5. 



6. 



The average family saves $60.00 to $100.00 per year hy us- 
ing locker service. 

You can butcher anytime of the year-summer or winter. 

75 Percent less work required than in canning fruits and 
vegetables. 

Preserve the garden-fresh flavor and food value of your 
own fruits and vegetables. 

A locker will serve as your stock of fresh f rutts, vegetables 
and meats. One locker will hold a quarter of beef and cue 
hog or approximately 100 frying chickens or the equivalent 
in fresh fruits and vegetables. Restocked as needed it will 
serve as a year round supply of fresh fruits. 

You can serve roasting ears, fresh cantaloupe or fried 
chicken for Christmas or any time during the year. 



A FROZEN FOOD LOCKER 

-WILL GIVE YOU ALL OF THESE ADVANTAGES 
AND STILL SAVE YOU MONEY 

GIVE IT YOUR SUPPORT! 



i 



IMS 



THE BOONS COUNT! RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



n— 



'■ »■ 

BKSS 



= 



FORTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 1, IMS* 



lire. Leomer Louden was a guest 
of Mrs. Minnie Kelly, last Satur- 
day and Sunday.' 

"Mrs. Will Ryle, of near here, was! 
taken quite 111 very suddenly, last 
Thursday." 

Flicker town 

The Woolper Telephone Co., met 
Thursday and elected Its officers 
as follows: W. T. Ryle, president; 
Root Terrlll, vice president; E. T. 
Krutz, treasurer; J. W. White, sec- 
retary; Chas. Hensley, Wm. Wal- 
ton and Dr. Weindell, directors. 

Charles Wilson and family are 
visiting at Rabbit Hash. 
McViUe 

Len Stewart and wife visited at 



TfflB TIME— 



U 



February 14, St. Valentine's 
Day, when most folks are 
Just a bit sentimental, and 
send mementos of different 
kinds. 




THE GIRL— 

Any lady from 6 to 60 who 
likes to be beautiful in body 
and soul and — somebody's 
valentine. 

and THE PLACE— 

STEVENS STUDIOS, where 
good portraits and photo- 
graphs are made. When you 
see the big valentine in our 
window, you will agree that a 
good photograph is what you 
want to send. 

No appointment needed. 
Open Saturdays to 9:00 
— Monday thru Frjday to 
6:08 In the evening. 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 



Wm. McMullins one day last week. 
C. C. Dolph, the local blacksmith 
is doing considerable repairing 
about his shop. 

Limaburg 
Miss Nora Ryle wasa guest of her 
cousin, Mrs. QeorgeNSmlth, near 
Waterloo, Sunday. V 

Mr. and Mrs. Israel Rouse enter- 
tained James Kelly and wife, Sun r 
day. * 

Verona 
Mrs. Ruth Roberts is spending a 
few days with her daughter, Mrs. 
Laura Cleek, near Beaver Lick. ~ 

Laf e Kennedy has been appoint- \*"\ 
ed postmaster at this place, and 
the office will be moved in the near 
future. 

Hathaway 
W. M. Rector and family, of near 
| Waterloo, spent last Sunday week 
! at Mr. and Mrs. W. S. White's near 

I here. : 

G. A. Ryle, wife and son spent 

last Sunday at their son, Ransom 

Ryle's on Gunpowder. 

Grant 

Misses Harriet VanNess and 

Gladys Ryle of Rabbit Hash and 



the Louisville Orphans' Home. 

A large number attended the 
party given by Misses Zetta and 
Mamie Ernst, Saturday night. 
Waterloo %■ 

Oscle Kelry returned Tart Mon- 
day, after spending a month fh 
California. 

Dave Williamson sold his crop 
of tobacco to Conner & Hogan at 
8 cents per pound. 

Petersburg 

Ernest Grant and wife, of Belle- 
view were guests of H. E. Arnold 
last Thursday. 

. : Will Snyder has gpne to New 
Orleans to take charge of a large 
distillery. 

Bullittsville 

Miss Eunie Willis left today for 
Cleveland, Ohio, to visit her sister, 
Mrs. Edgar D. Jones. 

We are sorry to report that Ken- 
neth Balsly does not improve. 
.Midway 

Miss Susie Krause spent last week 
in the city, visiting relatives. 

George Friend has moved to Jerry 
Oarr's farm on Mud Lick. 



Mrs. 



BURLINGTON R. 2. 

(Delayed) 
Cam White spent 



a few 



Mrs. Chas. Dolph, of McVille, spent 
Friday with Mrs. T. J. Clore. 

Sam Braddock, of Middle Creek 
was the guest of James Ryan, on 
Sunday. 

Pt. Pleasant 

Miss Virgie Riggs spent Satur- 
day and Sunday with friends in 
Crescent Springs. 

The party ,at Mr. Malchus South- 
er's Wednesday night was Wei! at- 
tended. 

Idlewild v 

Hon. J. A. Gaines and A. S. Win- 
ston and mother spent last Mon- 
day -with Mrs. O. W. Gaines. 

Chas Scothorn and daughter of 
Francesville, were guests of Luther 
Scothorn's, Saturday. 
Constance 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kottmyer vis- 
ited their daughter, Mrs. Chas. 
Hempfling this week. 

Robert Wilson got his arm brok- 
en by letting a large piece of ice 
fall on it. 

Belleview 

Capts. Ed and Will Maurer' are 
at home, watching the ice flow 
down the Ohio. 

W. W. Grant was visiting lira 
Powell and family, of Prospect 
Hill, Ind., last Sunday. 
Hebron 

Webb McGlasson and wife have 
adopted^a . 15-month-old girl from 



| GEO. W.HILL&C0.1 

ARE YOU READY 

For The Biggest Farm Year In History 



days with Mr. and Mrs. Jake Cook. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. West received 
an overseas address for heir son, 
Sgt. Herschel West. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kruse and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace Lucas, who enter- 
tained in honor of her brother, 
Wm. Kruse, Jr., who Is serving In 
the Navy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cook spent 
Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Cook. 

Bro. Ed Smith, wife and daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Cook, Mrs. 
Cam White, Harold L. Presser, 
Bettie Dean Ryle and Don Loomls, 
Bert Scott and Lou Williamson at- 
tended the sale of Wm. Delph Sat- 
urday 'afternoon. 

Herman Allen has been enter-' 
taining his brother, who recently 
returned from overseas duty. 



35= 



DAIRYMEN TO HOLD 

TWO-DAY MEETING 

Breeding, feeding, disease con- 
trol and breeders' organizations 
will be discussed by dairy farmers 
meeting Feb. 1 and 2 during the 
Farm and Home, Convention at 
Lexington. 

Speakers the first day will in- 
clude Dr. W. E. Carroll, University 
of Illinois; Dr. Glenn Salisbury, 
Cornell University; Dr. C. S. Bryan, 
Michigan State College, and Dr. W. 
W. Dimock and Prof. Auhjey Brown 
University of Kentucky. 

Dr. Salisbury will speak again 
Feb. 2, and will be followed by a 
meeting of fieldmen of national 
dairy cattle clubs and, In the aft- 
ernoon, by Kentucky breeders' 
meetings. The Kentucky Jersey, 
Holstein, Guernsey and Brown 
Swiss clubs will hold their annual 
sessions. 



iiimiiiimiioiiiiJiiiiiimiimimiiimiiiiii 

WITH OUR BOYS IN 
THE SERVICE 

iiliniliiiiiuiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuuiiu 

Virgil Vater, Jr., of Union, R. 1, 
who has been attending George- 
town College, Georgetown, Ky., has 
enlisted in the Merchant Marines 
and left for training January 10th. 
His iii» address will be Virgil Vat- 
er, Jr., AS 4514-01514, Section 9, U. 
S. M. s. Training Station, Sheeps- 
head Bay, Brooklyn, H. 1r. 
• * • 

The following letter was mailed 

us by Mrs. Barbara Dye, received 

from her husband in a hospital in 

England: 

"Dear Barbara, 
"Well another week is about gone 

and the war Is one week nearer ta d Russe11 MUler took 

an end. I can now tell you what 

counties I fought in. It was France, 

Germany and Belgium, and I am 

now in England, so I have seen 

quite a bit of the world, but believe 

me I wouldn't trade one square foot 

of Kentucky for the whole d 

business. _" * 

"I came through (censored) on 

the way back to England and I 

spent Christmas Day in Metz. In 

all these countries the houses are 

about the same. They build very 

strong houses, most of them are 
made Of stone. The barn is built 
right onto the house, you just step 
right out of the house into the 
barn. The manure pile is always 
right by the front door and al-j 
ways piled right by the well, and 
that I would not like. 

"The Germans are very strange 
people to understand. They were 
very put out because we were in 
France, and they got very mad 
when we got into Germany, so we 
thought maybe if we went up into 
Belgium that they might like us 
better, but they didn't so I don't 
know how wejire ever going to 
please them, and J furthermore I 
don't care. 



HAMILTON 

Henry Blanchett spent the week- 
end In C ov i ngton. 

Mr. end Mrs. Lewis Ryle called 
on her aunt, Mrs. Elva Norman, 
while In Erlanger, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Johnson and 
son Junior, were Sunday guests of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Huff. 

Miss Wilma Huff spent the week- 
end with. Mr. and Mrs. Claude 
Black. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hamilton call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Tom Huff, Sat' 
urday. 

Lewis Ryle and Henry Blanchett 
sold their tobacco last week. 

Conner Carroll took Harry Trapp, 
James and Lloyd Huff's and John 
and Harry Huff's tobacco to mar- 
ket the past week. 

Horace 
Ewalt's tobacco to market, Sunday. 

Sarah Bell Wood spent Friday 
night with Dorothy Shields and at- 
tended the ball game at Florence. 

Jimmy Jones spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Clifford Readnour and Sun- 
day night with Mr. and ' Mrs. 
Everett Jones. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Lovelace 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Huff 
on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Ryle called 
on Mr. and Mrs. John Hartman 
on Wednesday evening. 

Lewis Ryle and Harry Trapp 
were In Burlington, Wednesday. 



CELEBRATES 4TII BIRTHDAY 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Setters of 
1217 Southgate St., Covington, en- 
tertained in honor of their daugh- 
ter Priscilla Marie Setters' fourth 
birthday with a party at 6 p. m. 
Tuesday evening, January 23, 1945. 

Their guests were Mrs. Edna 
Tanner and two sons Ronnie and 
Donald Earl, Miss VelmaLee Black, 
Miss Sarah Feldhaus, Mrs. Mary 
Snyder and son Willie, Mrs. Alice 
Spencer and son Buddie, Mrs. Wil- 
ma Bumgartner and daughter 
Well, I am still flat of my back,, (Jeanne, Mrs. Edna Grammon and 

* three children Betty, George and 



Si 



Homemakers of Meldrum, Pine 
county, are working with the par- 
ent-Teacher's Association and 
pupils to decorate the local school. 

More wheat was seeded in Lee 
county last year than for many 
years 



being waited on hand and footy 
and you know how I hated to stay 
in bed when I am not sick. From 
my feet up I feel fine, but from 
there down I am not so good. They 
tell me it takes quite a while to get 
over trench-foot and I am begin- 
ning to think they know what 
they are talking about." 

* * * 

Alfred Surface Barlow, husband 
of Winifred Virginia Barlow, of 
Union, has been transferred from 
Camp Atterbury, Indiana, induc- 
tion center to Inf. RTC, Camp Wel- 
ters, Texas, for basic training, ac- 
cording to a report received last 
week* • 

* * * 

Pvt. Charles R. Willis, son of Al- 
bert Willis, who was recently in- 
ducted into the U. S. Army at Camp 
Atterbury, Ind., has been transfer- 
red to Inf. RTC, Cp. J. T. Robinson, 
Ark., for basic training. 

* * ♦ 



Lydel, Mrs. Wolline Petrice and two 
daughter Jackie and Margaret, 
Dannie Oliver, Janet Dames, Bud- 
die Thomas, Donald Thomas, June 
Abdon, Junior Akins, Priscilla 
Grondfother, John Feldhaus, and 
host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Setters. 

At 6:30 p. m. a beautiful birth- 
day cake was placed in the center 
of table and four candles „ were 
lighted. AH gathered around sing- 
ing "Happy Birthday." After the 
the refreshments were served, 
Games were enjoyed by the kiddies 
and all left at a late hour wish- 
ing Patty many more happy birth- 
days. 



RABBIT HASH 



Just received another shipment of 
Heavy Cast Aluminum. Now we 
can again offer this fine merch- 
andise at pre-war prices. 



Heavy Cast Aluminum 
2-QUART SAUCE PAN 



**%.»-■> 



m 



DIXIE BRAND 

SEEDS 

best for field and garden 

Tried and proven . . . best results 
assured . . . high in germination and 
purity ... all fresh new seed. 

/ 
A PENNY POSTCARD WILL SAVE YOU DOLLARS 

PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL 



DR. SALESBURYS POULTRY REMEDIES AND 
DR. HESS PTZ POWDER AND PELLETS 



Heavy Cast Aluminum 
101/2.-INCH SKILLET . 



.75 



Visit Our Pyrex Counter 

PATS CHINA STORE 

Also Location of 
GORDON SUPPLY CO. 
73G Madison Cov. HE. 



tat 



CEORGC W. 



Since IMS 

ILL 

■ AND — 

COMPANY 

SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 



24-2« W. 
SEVENTH ST. 

COVINGTON, 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 

KENTUCKY 



—COVINGTON— 

ARMY STORE 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 
CERTIFICATION OF 
AUTHORITY AG-095 

Military Accessories 

Insignia — Service 

Ribbons — Chevrons 

Patches 

Practical Needs 

— FOR— 

Service Men 

PANTS — SHIRTS 

CAPS — BELTS 

SOX — TIES 

SWEATERS 

GLOVES — SCARFS 

Furlough Bags,& Kits 

Shine & Sewing Kits 

Money Belts, Etc. 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

—•STORE— 

508 Madison Ave. 
COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Those on the sick list are some- 
what improved at this writing. 

Those butchering the past week 
were J. 'J. Scott, Gene Wingate, 
Chas. Bodie and Chas; Dolph. 

Joe Stephens moved to Walton, 
Sunday. 

Several boys from this commu- 
nity were inducted into the army 
the past week. * 

Wm. Aylor and wife, from Hon- 
olulu are vjsiting his parents, Paul 
Aylor and wife. He expects to re- 
turn to California from here. 

Several men shipped their to- 
bacco last week. 

Mrs. Vernon Gray and baby were 
visiting her parents a few days last 
week. 

Wm. Delph and wife spent Wed- 
nesday with Mrs. Maud Hodges 
and son in East Bend. 

Wm. Delph and family visited 
with the^ir parents in Petersburg 
recently. They also visited Mrs. 
Dora D8lph and family of Aurora, 
Ind., over the week-end. 

Those entertained at the home 
of Gene Wingate and wife over the 
week-end were Paul Acra and fam- 
ily, J. J. Scott and family, Mrs. 
Matt Hodges, Clayton Ryle and 
wife and Harry Acra. 

Mrs. B. W. Clore spent Wednes- 
day and Thursday of last week 
with her niece, Mrs. Gladys Ander- 
son and family, of Erlanger. Other 
guests were Mrs. Jeanette O'Con- 
nor and Mrs. Thelma Oesting and 
children Joan and Gay. 

Mrs. Clore and Mrs. Anderson 
.called on Mrs. Mayme Dolph and 
mother, Mrs. Lou VanNess, recent- 
ly. 

Miss Londelea Ryle, of Cincinnati 
is now visiting her parents, Jno. 
Ryle and wife and brother, Jno. W. 
Ryle, Jr. 

Joe VanNess took some chickens 
to Rising Sun, Friday. 

Mrs. Dora Delph Visited her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Jula Jarrell and husband 
a few days last week. 

Mrs. Mary Batchelor called on 
her brother Wm. Roland and fam- 
ily, Tuesday. 

W. B. Stephens was the week- 
end guest of Thad Ryle and wife 
of East Bend. 

Gene Wingate was in Burlington 
Saturday on business. 

Dorothy Delph spent the week- 
end with Maud Hodges and family. 



EXHIBITS PLANNED 

FOR STATE FARM, 

HOME CONVENTION 

Exhibits of improved machinery, 
home-made labor-saving devices 
and latest methods in tobacco dis- 
ease control, bam ventilation and 
curing methods will be a feature of 
the annual Farm and Home Con- 
vention at the University of Ken- 
tucky Experiment Station Jan. 30- 
Feb. 2. There also will be an ex- 
hibit on farm life in England dur- 
ing the war. 

Several programs of the conven- 
tion will deal with improved met- 
hods of farming, including ways 
to get more work done with less 
labor and time. Experiment Sta- 
tion men will demonstrate labor- 
saving methods as found in use on 
farms. Speakers will discuss vent- 
ilation of tobacco barns, control 
of tobacco diseases, better ways to 
cure hay, use of fertilizers, crop 
rotation, grass production and use 
of better seeds. 

The Importance of better farm 
water supplies will be discussed 
the first afternoon, including re- 
servoirs, wells, springs and sani- 
tation. 

After general sessions, the first 
and second days, the convention 
will be made up of special sessions 
dealings with dairying, meat pro- 
duction, poultrykeeping, fruit 
growing, the management of soils, 
crop production and improvement 
of farm living. Several breeders' 
associations will meet during the 
convention. Women will have their 
own meetings all four days. 



NBW CIRCULAR TEDLS 

ABOUT EWE TROUBLES 

Feeding is the most important 
item In the control of pregnancy 
disease of ewes, according to a new 
circular of the Kentucky Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station called 
"Disease of Sheep." In part It 
says: 

"The ewe should hate sufficient 
feed not only to be In good condi- 
tion but to gain in Weight during 
pregnancy. Ewes In good breeding 
condition should gain 20 to 30 
pounds during gestation. Thin ewes 
should gain 30 to 40 pounds or 
more. About half the increase in 
weight, should occur during the 
last third of pregnancy., 

**For prevention of 'pregnancy 
disease it J& important to have the 
ewes continue gaining in weight 
until the lambs are dropped. The 
grain requirement for one ewe will 
vary from a half-pound to a pound 
or more daily during the last 
month of pregnancy. The amount 
of grain to feed depends upon the 
quality of hay and pasture and the 
condition of the ewe . . . 

"Changes in management may 
result in lower feed consumption 
by ewes for a few days, and this 
failure to eat may cause pregnancy 
disease. In order to avoid this 
trouble a system of feeding and 
management should be worked out 
before the ewes become heavy 
with lamb, and this system should 
be followed without major change 
throughout the pregnancy period. 
"The ewes should be fed and 
quartered at all times in the place 
where one expects to keep them 
during periods of bad weather. It 
is very Undesirable to make 
changes in feeding and housing 
when the weather is changing 
from warm to cold or is wet or 
snowy." 



fVMMjrt Lane, a 4-H'er of Wood- 
ford county, reported producing 3,- 
218, pounds *f tobacco on an acre 
feedlot o£v% ntitiMKuid treat- 
ed with 1,500 pounds of fertiliser. 



O* 




LEARNS 






DR.J.O.TYSON 

OFFICC AT 

MOTCH 

TH€ JCW€L€RS 

613 15 MADISON OV. COVINGTON 
SINCC /3S7 



Plans are underway in Knox 
county for the planting of Kudzu 
by several farmers. 



ENAMEL 

Quick Dry. Walls, Woodwork and 
floors. Most all colors $ m .98 

52.75 val* X& al 



ALUMINUM PAINT 

Dutch Standard chrom- $#%.95 
atic Aluminum Paint . . ^pGal. 



GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 




NOTICE! 



ivmeen homemakers' clubs in 
Shelby county contributed $109 co 
the Phone-Home fund for hospit- 
alized soldiers in Louisville. 



OFFERS SUGGESTIONS 

TO TOBACCO GROWERS 

Russell Hunt, field agent, of the 
Kentucky College of Agriculture 
and Home Economics, makes the 
following suggestions on tobacco 
growing: 

1. Choose a variety resistant to 
black root rot, such as Ky. 41A or 
Ky. 16. 

2. Select a new plantbed site and 
when the plants are up treat the 
yeid with bluestone-lime mixture. 

3. Set tobacco 3Vi feet ^between 
rows and at least 19 inches between 
plants! 

4. Cultivate only enough to kill 
weeds and never cultivate deeply. 

5. Select the richest fields for 
tobacco or make them rich by add- 
ing manure and fertilizer. 

6. Top when about two-thirds of 
the plants are>M bloom and prime 
the lower leaves as they begin to 
turn yellow. ■ 

7. Use heat in curing to preserve 
quality and weight. 



5 ANNOUNCING TBE OPENING OF POLLITT'S CHICK AND 
I FEED STORE LOCATED AT 215 DIXIE HIGHWAY, 

ERLANGER, KY., DIXIE 7785 

* 55 

= Showing a complete line of Purina feeds and sanitation pro- 55 

ducts; also oil drum brooders, electric floor brooders feeders 55 

5= fountains and most all poultry supplies. ' ' a 

All chicks sold will be U. S. approved Pullorum tested from a 

as hatchery which has been in the business for many years = 

55 ^k ^L 1 !^ is be « innln 8 his sixteenth year in the handling of 55 

= baby chicks and for the past eight years has operated Sears 55 

55 t°iZ b * ck S J arm &?•> Covin 8ton, where he has made many 5 

I tsssxgs-iss^ continue serving m man " i 

IlHIIIIIHIIH IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIH 



COPPIN'S 
LOOKS 



^x 



FORWARD 



TO 






Homemakers in Trigg county re- 
poil having iipc toiiictlucw, and 
green peppers in January as a re- 
sult of paper wrapping and refrig^- 
eration. 



SPRING 

COPPIN'S 

MADISONAT 7TH 
COVINGTON, -j- KENTUCKY 



" 






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— 



— 



— 



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— — 



THK BOONS COUNTY 



lf> 



ftURUHGTON, KENTUCKY 

iii m ' 



j|IIIIIHIllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllHltlllUllllllllllllllllllHllllltllllllllllllllllllllllll| 

I Seen And Heard Around | 
| The County Seat | 

^illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHIIIItllli 



C. L. Craven, of Newport, called 
oft friends here, Saturday, -r- 



Ki 



M. Eddlns has been HI for the 
P tf™ *- ... 

|MLw Betty, Ryle spent the 
wtek-end with Mrs. Leon Ryle, of 
Erlanger. 



Miss Carolyn Cropper and John 
Cropper spent the week-end with 
Mrs. Harry Holtzclaw and children, 
of Dayton, Ohio. 



Little Beth Ann Vice, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Vice .has 
been quite 111 for the past few days. 



Mrs. Laura Frances Dendp»«fy of 
Erlanger called on her nftother Mrs. 
Nannie Riddell, Sunday afternoon. 



Mrs. L. Ii. Tucker, of near Wal- 
ton visited Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Lizer and daughter and Mrs. Wil- 
liam JarreU and daughter, last 
week. ■ . , 




MXHXHZHKH 



HXM«MXMXM*M«M«MXMX«MXH»HXM«NXMXH«M«HXM»4 

OWN YOUR OWN HOME | 

If .you have a reasonable amount to pay down on a 
home or a farm, come in and talk with us. We may 
he able to help you. We are anxious to make mort- 
gage loans and will take pleasure in discussing the 
matter with you. 

We will not encourage you to go in debt beyond 
youi* ability to pay, over a reasonable period of 
years. 

The interest rate will be 5%. Our discussion con- 
fidential. 

Peoples Deposit Bank jj 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY <» jj 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation '■ 

Capital $50,000.00 . Surplus $150,000.00 H 

MXMXMXMXMXMXHmXMSHSMXMXHXMXHXHXHXHXHXMXMXHXHXIIXMXHXK' 



Mrs. Mehrln Jones has been 111 
at her home In Burlington for the 
past several day* t 

?l i i .i ' ' iflUlr e V :i- :<n>| 
Mrs. Bess Rouse sj*n* two days 
last week with relatives in Cincin- 
nati. 



, 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank Humphrey 
and -little daughter of Florence, 
called on Miss Alberta Holmes, of 
Burlington, Saturday evening. 



Miss Emma Mae Brady, of Belle- 
view has been visiting Mrs. William 
JarreU and daughter for the past 
few days. : — _^ — __^ 



l^gue 



Friday afternoon guests of Mrs. 
George Porter were Mrs. John 
Conner of Hebron, Mrs. Harry May 
and Mrs. C. L. Cropper. 



Mrs. Lawrence Thompson of 
Florence has recently returned 
from St. Elizabeth Hospital and 
is doing nicely at this writing. 



Mrs. Howard Ryle, of Cincinnati, 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie McMullen and other rela- 
tives. 




Postmaster Examination 

I Petersburg 

tfOttaleg dm Service 
Commission has announced an ex* 
amination to fill the position of 
fourth class postmaster at Peters- 
burg, Kentucky. The examination 
will be held at Le/wrenceburg, ind. 
Receplt of applications will close 
on February 15, IMS. Salary $1100. 

The current salary will be temp- 
orarily increased by 15 percent, the 
amount not to exceed an average 
of $25 a month, by authority of an 
Act of Congress. -- 

The examination is open to all 
citizens of the United States who 
reside within the territory supplied 
by the post office for which this 
examination is announced and 
who are at least 21 years of age, 
but not yet 06, on the date of the 
close of receipt of applications for 
this examination. 

Application blanks and full in- 
formation about the requirements 
of the examination may be secur- 
ed from the post office for which 
this examination is announced, or 
from the United States Civil Ser 
vice Commission, Washington, 1 
C, on the date specified above. 

The date of^examination will be 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huey, of 
Petersburg and Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
May were Sunday eyening dlnnerf state ~ d n admission cards mailed 



guests of Mr, 
er. 



and Mrs. George Port- 



5 

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H 

I 



lift 



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^ I -A I ' 



f*fl 






Women in Service Work 
Applaud these StylesI 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like fos your 
hours on duty . . . feminine and flattering for your g&la even- 
ings! Get your go-everywhere hairstyle today! 

A LaRose Permanent will make it last and last 

RESTYiilNG-CUT, SHAMPOO-SET $2.00 

LaRose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Collins, Prop. 



The Home Store 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiuiiiiiiimiDMiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiHiiiiirMiiiii 

ORDER YOUR REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL 

FERTILIZER NOW! 

WE WILL HAVE OUR NEW CROP GRASS SEED ABOUT FEB- 

1— BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW! 



47-INCH, 12-INCH STAY HEAVY FENCE rd. 55c 

47-IN 6-IN. STAY HEAVY FENCE rd. 75c 

32-INCH 6-IN. HEAVY FENCE • • •$*>** 

BARB WIRE HEAVY 80-KOD SPOOL 4 pt. $4.35 



-3" 



TOBACCO . SEEDS! 
STAFFORD'S SPECIAL ORIGINAL LONG LEAF 

GOLDEN BURLEY 1 ox. $1.50 

BELL'S BOURBON WHITE BURLEY, a smoker from 

bottom to top; root-rot resistant tobacco seed 1 ox. $1.50 

NO. 16. WHITE BURLEY CERTIFIED SEED 1 ox. $1.50 

WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY 1 ox. $1.50 

...ox. $1.50 



The leader since 1940. 



OTAmnEiiv sj v»v»«j»#«ai'" »»»j»»— «j» .* « 

NO. S3 WHITE BURLEY WILT RESISTANT SEED 



WHITE VILLA FLOUR 24 lb. $1.39 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR 24 lb. $1.40 

WHITE VILLA FLOUR 5 lb. 33c 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR 5 lb. 35c 

SWEET HICKORY COFFEE 1 lb. 28c 

WHITE VILLA COFFEE ...... / 1 lb. 30c 

HONEY GROVE COFFEE 1 lb. 26c 

OLD BOONE COFFEE, bulk 1 lb. 29c 






100 LB. SHELLED CORN % $2.80 

100 LB. CRACKED CORN ...-...$2.90 

100 LB. SCRATCH FEED $3.25 

100 LB. 32% DAIRY » $3.30 

100 LB. 24% DAntY • . • $3.20 

100 LB. DEARBORN HOG and PIG RATION $3.50 

106 LB. 16% DAIRY f~.» $1.00 

400 LB. WHEAT MIDDLINGS . ;. . . $2.65 

L00 LB. MIX FEED :+. VT ■* =$2.65 

100 LB. SOYBEAN MEAL ....$3.10 

100 LB. DEARBORN LAYING MASH $3.65 



r 



6ULLEY ft PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENiUUKi 



Mr. and Mrs. Sam Ryle are the 
proud parents of a nine and three- 
quarter pound daughter, born Sat- 
urday, January 29th, named Jane 
Frances. 



Rev. R. A. Johnson, Howard 
Lizer, Elza Poston, Joe Smith and 
Bobby Brown attended an ordina- 
tion service of deacons at the Flor- 
ence Baptist Church, Sunday aft- 
ernoon. *, 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Maurer and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Combs and son spent Wed- 
nesday evening with Mr. and Mrs. 
E. J. Crutcher, of Park Hills. 



to applicants after the close of re- 
ceipt of applications and will be 
about 15 days after that date. 



Miss Corinne Walton, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Walton, 
Jr., Burlington, Ky., was listed on 
the Honor Roll of Georgetown 
College for the fall quarter with 
an A standing. 



HARRY H. BROWN 

Harry H. Brown, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. David Brown, of Florence, 
died January 18th at his home in 
Erlanger, after an illness of a year 
from heart trouble. 

He was an employee of the John 
Douglas Co., of Cincinnati for 34 
years and Jiad a large number of 
friends in this county. 

Funeral services were conducted 
by Rev. Ferguson of the First Bap- 
tist Churibh of Covington, assisted 
by Rev. /Ludwlck of the Elsmere 
Church at the grave, Florence 
Cemetery. 

He is survived by his wife Delia 
Roberts Brown and a large num- 
ber of other relatives. 



^MZMXMXftXXKnXKXtfaEKXMXMXMJ 



B , BUNDY'S 

Winter produH- 



omecoatfiaT 

JakicoaterTqpe- 



S 



. 



\ 



For use over wallpaper, j 
jj calcimine or most any inside jj 
jj surface. An oil base. * 






l£_ 



yimiiimiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: 

I HELP 

INFANTILE PARALYSIS 
i FUND 



= And Enjoy 



Grand Entertain- = 
ment £ 



HILLBILLY SHOW I 



and 



RADIO JAMBEREE § 

Covington Library Auditorium = 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH £ 
2:30 and 8:00 P.M. 



HANSER 

MUSIC CO. 



s 540 Madison 



Covington = 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiimiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHniii.; 






Walton Attorney 

Named Special Judge 

JohrwL. Vest, Walton attorney, 
was named as special judge by the 
Court of Appeals to sit in the series 
of litigations involving the estate 
of the late Louis Pfeiffer, Ft. 
Thomas florist. 

Vest was sworn in Saturday by 
Circuit Judge Ray L. Murphy after 
Judge Murphy voluptarily vacated 
the bench. 



PETERSBURG 

Mrs. Stanley Bonta, Mrs. Alfred 
White, Mrs. E. K. HeUns and daugh- 
ter NeU Jo. ■pent Tueaday in Cov- 
ington. 

Burgess Howard la able to be out, 
after being confined to his home 
the past week on accounf of 
bronchitis. 

John Weisickle la somewhat Im- 
proved at this writing. 

Mrs. Lyman Christy sprained 
her arm in a fall on the icy pavS- 
ment on Tuesday. 

Mrs. H. G. Mathews and daugh- 
ter Laura May spent the week-end 
with Henry Mathews and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hitzfield and 
son Billy spent Thursday with Mr. 
and Mrs. L. E. Chambers. 

Bluford Hensley and mother 
moved to town on Monday. 

Wilson Leek and family moved to 
Newport one day last week. 

Rev. and Mrs. Claude McDonald 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Percy 
Carver over the week-end. 

Mrs. Arthur Alloway Is Improving 
from injuries received in a fall on 
the Ice. 

Wllford Fleek moved into the 
Walston property on Monday. 

B. H. Berkshire has been on the 
sick list the past week. 

Rev. R. H. Carter called on the 
B. H. Berkshires on Saturday. 

James Feeley has been unable to 
report for work on account of a 
heart ailment for the past few 
days. 

Stanley E. Berkshire spent the 
week-end with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. E. P. Berkshire. He is 
enroute to Huntington, W. Va., to 
resume his work with the Early & 
Daniels Co., in that city. 



befnff confined to her 
eral months. She and 
ware business visitors 
Friday. 

Mr. and Mrar John 
Miss Gladys K3opp m»t. one /aft- 



ernoon last 

Mrs. Courtney Pope and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Rogers called 
on .Mrs. F. H. Brown and her 
house guests, Mrs. W. Williamson 
and Mrs. Jennie Rogers last Thurs- 
day afternoon. 

Mrs. J. C. Bums, Mrs. L. h. Deck 
sirs. Win Burns, Mrs H W Baker 
and Mrs. H B. Arnold spent Sat- 
urday with Mrs 8. R. Smith and 
assisted her in preparing a hog 
killing dinner. 




Mrs. John Klopp and Miss Gladys 
were shopping in Aurora, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Mallfcoat 
moved Saturday to the J. H. Huey 
farm. 

Miss Lou Jean Fleek is the guest 
of her sister, Miss Ida Mae Fleek 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ovit 
Webster. The Misses Fleekes were 
shopping in Aurora, Saturday aft- 
ernoon. 



// 



Florence Man Enrolled 

In Radio Naval School 






Clyde V. Arnold, 20, husband of 
Mrs. C. V. Arnold, Florence, Ky., 
was enrolled recently in an inten- 
sive course at the Radio Naval 
Training School located on the 
campus of the University of Wis- 
consin, Madison, Wisconsin. 

Selection to attend the special- 
ty school was made on the basis 
of his recruit training aptitude 
tests. The course includes the 
operation, function and mainten- 
ance of radio transmitting and re- 
ceiving equipment, and the send- 
ing and receiving of messages in 
international code. 

Successful completion of the 
course will see the Bluejacket grad- 
uate as a qualified radio operator 
with the fleet. * 



HILL TOP 



PRIMING TOBACCO * 

PAYS BIG WAGES 

Celestlne Mattingly of Breckin- 
ridge county figures that he made 
$4.50 an hour when he primed his 
tobacco last fall. From a half -acre, 
he primed 1,038 sticks of 75 to 80 
leaves each. Farm Agent Kenneth 
A. Brabant reports that the strip- 
ped leaves weighed 844 pounds and 
brought a gross return of $472.50. 



Mr. 

evening. Mary 

ed for a few days. 

Lewis B. Kelly, son of Mr 
Mrs. Paris Kelly, returned 



tfceU S 









Hospital. 

William Krose of 
returned to his aaval 
folk, Va., Sunday 

Miss Betty Jean Ryle 
home Tuesday morning from 
Samaritan Hospital, after 
going 'a minor operation. 

Pearl West has been on 
list the past week. 

Harry Shmkto 
ind"" a few days with his 
law Mable Abdon and children. 

Robert Denniston of the Merch- 
ant Marines Is spending his far- 
lough with his wife and family. 

Bobby, Wayne and Mary 
Kelly, spent Tuesday night 
their aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
Brady. 

Mary F. Buckler has been 
ing the past week with her sister- 
in-law, Mrs. Rosie Buckler. 

Earl Simons of the Merchant 
Marines Is spending a few days 
with Mr. and Mrs. McClure. ; 



To prevent soil erosion, B. M. 
Williams of Garrard county set 
6,000 trees on his farm. 



Opl. John Robert Darby's num 
erous friends were glad to welcome 
him in this community Thursday. 

Mrs. Maude Asbury, of Florence 
and Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury 
and daughter spent Saturday with 
relatives and friends in Bracken 
and Robertson counties. 

Mrs. Lawrence Wilson, of Cin 
cinnati was the Wednesday night 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Truman 
Lucas. 

Mrs. Roy Nieman and daughter, 
Joan, of Covington, spent Sunday 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Riley and daughter Lucille. 

Mrs. Frank Anderson and Mrs. 
Wm. Buckler of Hebron, called on 
Mrs. W. D. Carder and daughter 
Wednesday. 

Sylvia Lee Moore, little daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Meore, while 
visiting her grandparents, of Cin- 
cinnati, received injuries while 
coasting. 

Wm. Bock has been on the sick 
list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Anderson 
and children spent a pleasant day' 
last Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Bill 
Imwalle, of Covington. 

Mrs. George Rensler, of Con- 
stance, called on Mrs. Elmo Jer- 
gens, Wednesday afternoon. 
- Mr. and Mrs. George Tungate, of 
Constance were supper guests Fri- 
day evening of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Miller and mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Asbury 
and daughter, Miss Lucille Riley 
and Joan Nelman attended the 
basketball game at Hebron Fri- 
day night, between Burlington and 
Hebron. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Anderson 
entertained on Saturday night In 
honor of their children's birthday, 
Carlton and Kathleen 10 and 7 
years. The guests were the Asbury 
and Riley families.'" 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Wohrley 
and children, of Newport, were the 
Sunday guests of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Emmett Riddell. 

Miss Lorena Regenbogen, of 
Ludlow, Miss Saralv Booth, of 
Bromley, called on the W. D. Card- 
ers, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Truman Lucas 
spent Thursday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. Omer Lindsey, of Latonia. 



GASBURG 

1 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bradburn, of 
Covington spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. Charles White 
and family. 

Mrs. E. E. Klopp and son were 
shopping in Aurora, Saturday aft- 
ernoon. They also called on their 
grandmother, Mrs. Roland McCar- 

ty. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Baker were 
the Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Smith and children. 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Snyder spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Melton 
Ulmer and daughter and Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Brassfield and daugh- 
ter, of Evanston, Ohio. 

Messrs Wm. Burns, Jr., Edwin A. 
Burns, Donald and Atlson Wolfe, 
Harry Bayer and George Couch 
went to Louisville Induction Cent-. 
er for physical examinations lastj 
Wednesday. They returned Wed- 
nesday with the exception of- Mr. 
Couch, who returned Saturday 
night. 

E. E. Klopp and son called on 
Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector Sunday, 
while Mrs. Klopp called on her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Leek. 

Charlie Sutton and Hugh Arn- 
old were business visitors In Pet- 
ersburg, one morning this week. 

Charles White, Ott Rogers and 
Wallace Aylor were on the tobacco 
market at Lexington one day last 
week. 

Glad to report that Mrs. Nat 
Rogers is able to be out again after 



FARMERS ! 

RED CLOVER and ALFALFA HAY 

GRASS SEEDS and FERTILIZERS 

Order early so we can be able to supply you. 

FLORENCE FEED & ELECTRIC STORE 

RAYMOND GROSS, Prop. 
Flor. 106. Florence, Ky. 



Thomas James of Edmonson 
county has a flock of 168 White 
Leghorn pullets which made a pro- 
fit of $66 during one m&nth. 



JAMESWAY 

OIL and ELECTRIC 

BROODERS, WATER FONTS 

METAL FEEDERS and 

HOG FEEDERS 



JAMESWAY 

HAT TOOLS and BARN 

EQUIPMENT 

I. H. C. Farm Machinery and 
Repairs 



ZIMMER 



H A RD W A R 



CO 



537-39 Pike St. Covington 
HEmlock 4741 



Tobacco growers in Ballard coun- 
ty reported using commercial fert- 
ilizer on more than half the to- 
bacco acreage. X 



POTJLTRY EQUIPMENT and 
SUPPLIES 

OIL and ELECTRIC. 

BROODERS 

METAL FEEDS - WATER 

FOUNTAINS 

POULTRY REMEDIES 

FUL-O-PEP and BR. HEINZ 

NU-WAY FEEDS 



TUNG 





imiiM RVICI 



512 Pike Co**nrt«n 3 Ky. 

HE. 9168 Open Daily till 7 p.m. 



*r~s HALLMARK 

VALENTINE GREETING CARDS 

STATIONERY - OFFICE SUPPLIES 

AUTOGRAPHIC REGISTER SUPPLIES 

STEWART-CARR 

505 Madison Avenue Covington 



.-•• 



NOTICE! 



I have moved from my old place of 
business to Vine and Dixie Highway, 
Elsmere, Ky. 

» L. 



Most modern shop in town, with 
two barbers at your service daily. 



McCall's Barber Shop 



TOBACCO SALES 



fjr*HMHi 






COME IN EARLY AND GET YOUR 
SALE THAT DAY. SOMETIMES IT 
MAY BE SOLD THE NEXT D<AY IF 
YOU COME IN THE AFTERNOON. 
COME EARLY, NO WAITING. . 



KENTON LOOSE LEAF 
TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

2nd & Scott Sto. Cwvtaiiton, Ky. 

Phone HE. 3552 

HERBERT H. WHITLEY, Mgr. 




mmmmm 



m 



mm 



MM 



1, 1MI 



THE BOON! COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

From the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF FEBRUARY 5, IKS 



Flicker town 

Millard Sullivan and family vis- 
ited his parents, Saturday and 
8unday. 

—J. H. Snyder, wife and son Car- 
rel, visited Henry Deck and family 
Sunday. 

Belleyiew 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Rogers spent 
Sunday with their son Edward and 
family. A 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Maurer had as 
guests Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Andy 



3E 



Cook, Mr. and Mrs. "Pep" Smith, 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Stephens, Mr. 
and Mrs. Sherman Burcham and 
family, Mrs. K. K. Berkshire, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ephriam Clore and Miss 
Blanche Shinfcle. 

Lovers Lane 




W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of * 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

I Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



WANTED! 

•All kinds of Band Instru- 
ments — Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxaphones; 
etcf 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 



540 Madison 



HE. 7413 



Ina Presser and friend and How- 
ard Presser spent last Sunday with 
Willia Maud Carpenter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Aylor and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Sid Clements and family. 
Verona 

Mrs. Al Allphin is recovering 
over a severe attack of pneumonia. 

Verona has procured a tomato 
canning factory by R. B. St. Clair, 
of Venton, Va., and farmers will 
grow tomatoes. 

Hebron 

Frances, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Siekman, who attends 
school here, developed a case of 
scarlet fever last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Aylor en- 
tertained several relatives last 
Sunday with a lovely dinner. 
Erlanger 

Misses Sophia and Ethel Buck- 
ner and Louise Rogers who are at- 
tending school at Shelbyville, Ky., 
spent the week-end with home 
folks. 

Mrs. M. L. Riddell, of Burlington 
will pass this week with her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Walton Dempsey and Mr. 
Dempsey, of the Dixie Highway. 
Hopeful 

C. S. Acra, of Lexington, spent 
several days the past week with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 
Acra. 

Sam Blackburn and family and 
J. E. Hays, of Walton, spent Sun- 
day with Mrs. Annie Beemon and 
family. 

Waterloo 

Miss Mary Ann Merrick spent 
last Sunday night with Miss Mabel 
Feeley. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elia Pendry and son 
Lee Roy, Mrs. Leomer Louden and 
son Russell and Miss Madelene 
Kelly were Monday guests of Mrs. 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 
FREE CHECKING 

R. Mlchels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St. Covington, Ky. 



Elmer Jarrell, of Bellevlew. 
Rig Bone 

Perfect attendance for month at 
school: Anna Katharine Aylor, 
William Wesley Aylor, Susie Cath- 
erine Allen, William Allen, Charles 
Fibbs, Paul Shields. 
Devon 

Mrs. Francis Kenney and moth- 
er Mrs. E. F. Vallandingham, at- 
tended Mrs Craig's funeral at 
Sadieville, Friday. 

Mrs. Frank McCoy returned 
home Friday evening from Sadie- 
ville. 



Gunpowder 

Chas. Smith and wife have mov- 
ed In with her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. A. Rouse. 

After spending about three weeks 
in Florida, Ezra Blankenbeker and 
wife, returned home last Saturday. 
Beaver Lick 

Mrs. Elmer Dennigan called on 
friends here Sunday. 

Mrs. Nannie Slayback entertain- 
ed a few of her city friends Sun- 
day evening. 

Ft. Pleasant 

Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Tanner 
spent Sunday with their daughter, 
Mrs. Tom Bonar and Mr. Bonar. 

Mrs. Estella Starcher is nursing 
in the city and her daughter, Miss 
Sarah, is taking a business course. 
Nonpariel Park 

Harry Flsk and lady friend, of 
Covington, were guests Sunday of 
his parents, Albert Fisk and -wife. 

J. G. Renaker and wife attend- 
ed the funeral of Mrs. Wm. Billiter, 
of Covington, Friday morning. 
Constance 

Luther Hood was on the sick list 
a few days last week. 

Richard Tunning is still in St. 
Elizabeth Hospital. 

Burlington 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gaines are 
the proud parents of a fine baby 
boy since Saturday, January 1st. 



RECORDER 1 YEAR $1.50 



UPSET STOMACHS 
YIELD INCHES OF 
GAS AND BLOAT 

"I was so full of gas I was airaid 
I'd burst. Sour, bitter- substance 
rose up in my throat from my 
upset stomach after meals. I got 
ERB-HELP, and it worked inches 
of gas and bloat from me. Waist- 
line is way down now. Meals are 
a pleasure. I praise Erb-Help to the 
sky."— This is an actual signed tes- 
timonial from a man living right 
here in Elsmere. 

ERB-HELP is the new formula 
containing medicinal juices from 
12 Great Herbs; these herbs cleanse 
bowels, clear gas from stomach, act 
on sluggish liver and kidneys. 
Miserable people soon feel differ- 
ent all over. So don't go on suf- 
fering.— Get Erb-Help. Elsmere 
Pharmacy, Dixie Highway. 



\ 



PUBLIC 



■#■ 



HAVING SOLD MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE 
HIGHEST BIDDER AT MY FARM LOCATED 4 MILES NORTHWEST OF 
BURLINGTON AND l>/ 2 MILES SOUTHEAST OF IDLEWILD, ON THE 
BURLINGTON-IDLEWILD ROAD, BOONE COUNTY, KENTUCKY, 

Saturday, Feb. 3rd 

BEGINNING AT 12 O'CLOCK SHARP, CENTRAL WAR TIME 

The following personal property : One team good work horses and set of 
double harness; 3 cows, 2 fresh and 1 will be fresh in May; 2 wagons, box 
and hay bed; 2 mowing machines; 1 riding cultivator; 1 disc harrow; 1 
smoothing harrow; 1 hinge harrow; 1 land plow; 1 one-horse 5-shovel cult- 
ivator; 1 double shovel plow; 1 single shovel plow; one 2 -horse hay rake; 1 
corn roller; 1 sled, and set of new runners; 1 corn shelter; 2 grindstones; 8 
or 10 stone jars, capacity 1 to 10 gallons; l\corn planter; 1 posthole dig- 
ger; 1 crowbar; 1 vise; 1 sheep shearing machine; sheep shears; 1 long 
handle shovel; 1 pitchfork; 1 manure fork; 1 wheelbarrow; 1 buggy; 1 
sleigh; 1 hand fruit sprayer; 1 crosscut saw; 2 saddles; 1 side saddle; 1 
sausage mill and stuffer; 1 cream separator; 1 White Mountain ice cream 
freezer; 1 ten-gallon copper kettle; 5,000 or 6,000 tobacco sticks; 2 feeding 
troughs; lot of small tools; 1 bedroom suite; 1 set coil springs; 1 feather 
bed; 1 leather couch practically new; dishes, tables, chairs, a few antiques 
3 lard kettles; 1 one-man saw; and many other articles too numerous to 
mention. 

TERMS : GASH 



McVILLE 

Seaman Robert Williamson visit- 
ed with his wife and children here 
part of last week. He left here for 
California where he will be sent to 
sea. 

Lewis Edwin Kelly was in a Cin- 
cinnati hospital a few days last 
week for a tonsil operation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Smith have 
returned to their home near Rabbit 
Hash after spending several weeks 
with Mr. and Mrs. Herbert West 
and daughter. _ 

Miss Pearl West is on the sick 
list. 

Clifford Scott and Russell Rol- 
and were boys who went to Louis- 
ville from here last Wednesday. 

Miss Mary Williamson of Mari- 
etta, Ohio, visited her mother, Mrs. 
May Williamson, a few days last 
week. 

Glad to see Miss Betty Ryle out 
after a minor operation last week. 

Vera Dean Scott spent Sunday 
with June Stephens at Bellevlew. 

Mrs. Hazel Williamson and chil- 
dren visited her parents at Rabbit 
Hash over the week-end. 

Mrs. Vernon Scott called on Mrs. 
Josie Maurer at Burlington, Fri- 
day evening. 

Several from here attended the 
Bellevlew school club meeting on 
Friday afternoon. 

Mrs. Lillard Scott spent Thurs- 
day with her mother, Mrs. Ralph 
Cason, who is on the sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Stephens moved 
this week to Walton, where they 



wlU. make their home. Mr. and 
Mrs. Orville Kelly assisted with the 
moving. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cam White and 
Mrs. Percy Ryle spent the week 
end at their home here. 

Mrs. Herman McClure is enter 
tabling her brother and friend. 

Mrs. Paris Kelly and family en 
tertalned her mother, Mrs. Lewis 
Merrick from Indiana, part of last 
week. . . « 

Webb Rogers and Everett Green 
visited Tom Rogers and family 
part of last week. 

Seaman Billie Kruse has for the 
past few weeks enjoyed a furlough 
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Kruse and family. • 



HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Sunday, Feb. 4, 1945: 
Sunday School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning Worship 11:00 a. m.. 
Bro. Paul Rimmer will bring the 
message. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev. L. M. Hamilton, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:00 a. m. (CWT). John Whltaker, 
Supt. 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 7:30. 

We invite you to come and wor 
ship with us. 



NOTICE! 



Any person failing to receive one of our calend- 
ars, please write or call and we will mail you one 
promptly. 

Chambers & Grubbs 



WALTON, 



KENTUCKY 



^i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1^ 

| PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. j 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

2 5 

fATi I 



SEVENTY-ONE APPROVED 

KENTUCKY HATCHERIES 

Seventy-one of the 120 hatch- 
eries in Kentucky operated under 
the National Poultry Improvement 
Plan last year, according to the 
poultry section of the College of 
Agriculture at Lexington. 

The capacity of these 71 hatch- 
eries was 3,005,750 eggs. About 4,- 
000 flocks supervised by the Ken- 
tucky Poultry Improvement Asso- 
ciation supplied the eggs. 

Despite the drouth and 'high 
price of feed, chickens were raised 
lest, year at reasonable costs where 
good practices were followed, the 
college reports. Costs were higher 
than In 1943. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



HUSBAND, WOTS TRY 

. EXCHANGE OF WORK 

Mrs. Charlie Moss, president of 
Hickman County Homemakers' 
Clubs, and her husband believe In 
taking turn about when it comes 
to hard work. Mrs. Moss report- 
ed to Home Agent Augusta Ray- 
that she had helped her husband 
saw wood, pick cotton, and grind 
wheat and corn once a week for 
the hogs, and that he had helped 
her with the -washing and house- 
work. During the summer and 
fall, Mrs. Moss helped with the hay 
harvest and rode the mowing 
machine and hay rake. 



A thousand acres of burley to- 
bacco were grown by 700 farmers 
In McCracken county In 1944, the 
crop averaging over 1,000 pounds 
per acre. 

— - ~— — =gg 



BLANKET 

LE! 

72x84 Double Blanket, 25% Wool $C.98 

by Nashua. White Satin binding +" 

72x84 SINGLE BLANKET $<i.98 

25 Percent Wool <* 

TOBACCO COTTON 9 Feet wide $£.98 

100 Feet Long » 

REG. $3.98 SKIRTS, pleated $2.98 

100 Percent Wool Slipover Sweaters..... $3.98 

CHILDREN'S SNO SUITS AT >/ 2 PRICE 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," 
"Poll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. , 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 



& s 



dllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII? 



TOBACCO SEED 

41-A KY. EXPERIMENT STATION CERTIFIED 

Resistant to Root-Rot, a disease that causes 

^low yields on many soils. 

No. 16 NEW IMPROVED BIG WHITE BURLEY 

Also Root Rot Resistant 

EARLE'S OLD FASHION YELLOW STEM 

Twist Bud 

EARLE'S GOLDEN BURLEY (Warner) 

STAFFORD'S SPECIAL 

The original Long Leaf Golden Burley 

All Seed Ky. Experiment Station tested for 

Germination 75c Y 2 oz. — $1.50 1 oz. 

GEO. C. GOODE 

COVINGTOk -:- KENTUCKY 



)9 



, lie e. 



BURLINGTON* KY. R.„l. 



LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



U mm , 

Reg. $79.95 Cabinet sinks complete $59.95 

Reg. $12.50 Electric portable heaters 9.95 

Reg $139.50 22" Hot ah- furnace v . . 109:95 

Reg. $59.95 White Gas Range ™~ 49.95 

Reg. $22.56 Toilet tank and bowl 7. ............. . 19.95 

Reg. $3.95 White Deluxe Toilet Seat 3.19 

Reg. $13.95 Laundry Trays, steel trimmed 10.45 

Reg. $13.95 30-Gal. Hot water tank, X. H. .' 12.50 

Reg. $3.49 Pin-up Lamp with shade »...•;. 2.98 

Reg. $3.49 Metal bed lamp with cord 2.98" 

Reg. $98.95 Automatic electric water, heater 89.95 

Reg. $12.50 Florescent desk lamp 9.95 

Reg. $78.50 Electric water systems (Pump) 74.50 

Reg. $3.95 White steel medicine cabinet 3.45 

Reg. 98c Iron Cord 6' approved . . . t : 7. 79 

Reg. $1.59 Large white stew pots 1.39 

Reg. $1.49 Perculators ...... .1.29 

Bluegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) V 

121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5726 



Buy Your Hardware Early! 
IT IS SCARCE . . . 

Jamesway 500-Chick Elec. Hovers $39.95 

Oakes 300-Chick Elec. Hovers 29.95 

Jamesway 500-Chick Oil Brooders 25.00 

AH size chick feeders and fountains 

Flock Feeders, on legs , 4.75 

Flock Heated Waterers on stand 8.50 

Electric Units to build brooders 6.95 

Electric Water Heaters for Fountains 3.95 

Water Fountains for Barrels :.... 2.95 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Tonic 

PTZ Capsules and Powder for Worms 

Hog Lye for Feeding Purpose 

5 and 10-Gallon Milk Cans 

Fence Stretchers 9.50 

Single Wire Stretchers 2.50 

Seed Sowers (Cyclone) ...;.... 2.75 

Plenty of saws, axes, grub hoes, mattocks, picks 

iron wedges, posthole diggers and 

handles of all kinds. 

* - • 

Large Selection of Harness 

PLANT BED FERTILIZER BY THE BAG 

NITRATE OF SODA BY THE POUND OR BAG 

OLIVER AND VULCAN CHILLED PLOWS 

Most all repairs for both 

GARDEN PLOWS - 3-SHOVEL CULTIVATORS 

SLED SOLES and BAR IRON 

GALVANIZED WATER PIPE and FITTINGS 
ELECTRIC WIRlNd MATERIAL 
ELECTRIC FENCE CHARGERS 
WIRE FENCE and BARB WIRE - 
1 THORNHILL FARM WAGON 

1 COLE FERTILIZER and CORN DRILL 
-^-Linoleum Rugs and Linoleum by Yard 
Heating Stoves and Coal Water Heaters 
30-Gallon Range Boilers 

PERFECTION 3-BURNER OIL COOK STOVES 

Grate Baskets 20" and 24" 

Pedal Type Grindstone 

Electric Tool Grinders 

Large assortment of belts, pulleys and grinding 

wheels. ' 

CONRAD HARDWARE 



PHONE 23 



WALTON, KY. 



■ 






- 



wmmm 



» 



™ 



^se=*w-ep 



s^Msssasea^e^aW 



IBS BOOMS COUNTS BBOOBDBt, BURLINGTON, 

■ ■■ ' ■ - 



FLORENCE 



Kdward Biddle, son of Mr. And 
Mrs. Otto Biddle, left December 20 
to be Inducted In the armed ser- 
vices. He to stationed at Camp 
Blanding, Fla. 

Mrs. Minnie Clore spent Sunday 



afternoon with Mrs. Emma Cleek Ptnevllle, with a six o'clock dinner 



and Mrs. R. L. Day 

Wedding bells will soon be ring- 
ing in Florence. 

Marie and Jo Ann Kinman en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Caton, 
James Robert West, who was home 
on leave and Mrs. J. I. West, of 




LET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZGER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 
o3i Madison Ave., Covington. AV- 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 PHONE 762 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed .$2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.15 

32% Dairy Supplement °>.25 

Big V Laying Mash i ^.40 

40% Hog Supplement 3.75 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Ration 3.45 

55% Meat Scrap 4.35 

41% Soybean Meal 3.05 

Ground Wheat ::?. 2.90 

Wheat Middlings 2*75 

Wheat Bran , 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal 2.85 

Hominy Meal 2.85 

Poultry Scratch 3.20 

24% Brewery Grain ..: > 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet 3.30 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt 1.25 

Block Salt Z. f. 65 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells » 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



at Doc's Place last Tuesday wen 
ing. 

James Robert West 81-c of Pine- 
ville, who has been overseas for 14 
months, spent several days of his 
leave with Mr. and Mrs. F. t>. Ca- 
ton. 

Mr. "and Mrs. C. Blaine Shepherd 
entertained at their home Sunday 
with a dinner in honor of their 
oldest son Harold, who arrived 
home Wednesday, after 19 months 
in the South Pacific. 

Guests were Mr. and Mrs. A. C. 
Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. 
Martin, Sr., and daughters Janet 
and Marilyn, Mr. and Mrs. Grover 
B." Shepherd and son Dennle and 
Mrs. Robert C. Martin, Jr. 

S-Sgt. Shepherd, who is in Ma- 
rine Aviation, will report to Cherry 
Point, North Carolina, after 30 days 
at home. 

Thanks to those sending* items 
in for this column. We appreciate 
your cooperation. 

E. O. Stephenson, who was in 
Irvine ,Ky., last Monday on busi- 
ness returned to his home on 
Tuesday. 

Dr. E. Rouse and wife, of Ludlow, 
enjoyed a visit on Friday afternoon j after passing a 
with his mother, Mrs. Mary E.|with her husband 
Rouse. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Conner had 
as overnight guests on Wednesday, 
Mr. and Mrs. Denny, of Lexington. 

Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Becker, 
of Lloyd Ave., will be sorry to learn 
that their daughter has scarlet 
■fever. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tanner of U. 
S. 42 was calling on Mr. and Mrs. 
p. J. Allen, Saturday afternoon 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Conner have 
for their week-end guests his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Conner, of Bur- 
lington. 

E. O. Stephenson spent several 
days in Indianapolis last week, on 
business. 

Mrs. Katie Carpenter was called 
to Covington by the death of her 
sister, Miss Alice Ceary. 

Mrs. Floyd Sininger has been 
called to the bedside of her moth- 
er, Mrs. Cracraft, of Germantown, 
Ohio, who is very ill 

The large circle of friends of 
Mrs. Lawrence Thompson who has 
been confined to St. Elizabeth Hos- 
pital, following an operation, will 
be delighted to know that she is 
convalescing nicely, and will return 
home Monday. 

Lawrence Pope, who has been 



NOTICE 

The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be^ootain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



enjoying several weeks' visit with 
his son Raymond Pope waa a wel- 
come visitor here on Friday and 
was on his way to visit his other 
son Russell Pope and family, of 
Erlanger. 

Mrs. Joseph Surface of Carroll- 
ton Is spending a few weeks at the 
bedside of her mother, Mrs. Carrie 
Surface, who remains qutte ill at 
her residence. u 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Cook and 
family, of Covington spent Satur- 
day evening with his brother, Mr. 
and Mrs. Elbert Cook and family. 
R. E. Tanner and wife called on 
Mrs. Stella Carpenter and P. J. 
Allen and wife, Saturday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. Bertha Dixon is suffering 
with a broken arm, the result of a 
fall on the ice. 

R. F. Woodward and wife enter- 
tained with a turkey dinner last 
Sunday. The guests were Theo- 
dore Carpenter, wife and Son and 
Wm. Woodward and wife. 

Thursday evening guests of Eld- 
ridge/ ''Carpenter and family were 
Wm/Ruth and wife, of near Wal- 
ton. - • ' ■ 
Mrs. Ray Myer has returned home 
few days' visit 
at Camp Knox 
who will leave soon for overseas 
duty. 

Mrs. Millard Collins, of Coving- 
ton was a welcome visitor here 
on Friday. She called on Mrs. 
Lillie Corbin and Mrs. Russell 
Mitchell. 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
Lee Eddins remains very ill at her 
residence. 

Charles Corbin and wife, of Cov- 
ington spent Friday evening with 
his mother, Mrs. Lillie Corbin. 

Mrs. Helen Orschelle and family 
*pent the week-end with relatives 
in Newport. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brady Johnson, of 
Burlington Pike have for their 
guests, her father, Mr. Conrad, of 
Dry Ridge. 

The many friends of Miss Grace 
Eddins regret to learn of her ill- 
ness. We wish for her a speedy 
recovery. 

Robert Surface ,of Burnside, Ky., 
spent the week-end with his moth- 
er, Mrs. Carrie Surface and sister, 
Mrs. Joe Surface. 

Mrs. L. T. Aylor was dinner guest 
Sunday of her son Robert L. Aylor j 
and family of U. S. 42. 

Pvt. Edgar Allen McCrandle, who j 
has spent over two years overseas 
is enjoying a furlough with his 
brother Robert McCrandle and 



family and other relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Skrtvln and 
family, of Louisville spent the 
week-end here with his sisters, 
Mrs. Lora Laile and Mrs. Lillie 
Corbin. 

The many friends of Miss Mar- 
garet Aylor regret to learn that she 
remains In a serious condition at 
Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincin- 
nati 

The many friends here regret to 
learn that aunt Harriet Utz is very 
ill at her residence. She is 03. 

Mrs. John M. Connley and sons 
visited Mrs. Tillie Klrchoff and 
daughter-in-law on Thursday aft- 
ernoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. .Lucas spent 
the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. H. 
Bruce, of Ludlow. 

Mrs. Ann Conner was In Cincin- 
nati, Saturday on business.' 

Mrs. Evelyn Connley and mother 
of Elsmere entertained Wednesday 
evening with a six o'clock dinner 
party in compliment of Mrs. John 
M. Cormley and sons, it being little 
Ronnie's birthday. 

J. D. Lucas was in Louisville 
Monday on business. 

Quite a number from 'here at- 
tended services at Hopeful Luth- 
eran Church on Sunday morning. 
Rev. Paul Rimmer delivered a 
memorial service for Pfc. William 
F. Bell, who died December 5th in 
Germany from wounds he received 
in action. ~ 



WATERLOO 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Head and 
daughters were the week-end 
guests of the Stevens family. 

Bud Brown moved to the farm 
he purchased from his fattier 
known as the Sullivan property. 
Anderson Rowe moved to the Rice 
brick bouse. 

.Mr. and Mrs. Jake Hopkins re- 
turned Monday after a visit with. 
their son. Bill Hopkins and family, 
of North Carolina. 

Sissy Presser spent Sunday and 
Sunday night with Nellie Jo Purdy. 




MUUe called on 1 
coat one day last 

Mr. and Mis. Bert Seott and sea 
spent Wednesday in Florence. 

Kermit Mallieoat and son awe 
Saturday guests of Mr. and lata. 
West Kittle. 

Bud Rector called on his sea 
George and family Saturday night. 

Vernon Stephens wired BasasO 
Louden's barn, W ednes day. 



Maks aoese nspAins now! 



Roofings 



NOTICE 



Persons < owning dogs that were 
in my sheep Sunday, January 28, 
are hereby notified to kill these 
dogs to avoid further complica- 
tions. Any dogs caught on my 
farm will be killed on sight. 32-2p 
UTZ AND BLACKBURN, 
Burlington, Kentucky. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 




£xp€*t 

Service 




LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 
COVINGTON 



BREAKFAST 



LUNCHEON 



DINNER 

6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 
AIR CONDITIONED 



. AVAILABLE WITHOUT DELAY 

If you need roof repairs, or an entirely now roof, 
there ia.no government regulation that willfdelay 
the work. Wa have available ample stock of CAREY 

1 

Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of p r o mpt 
and the biggest roof value to be had 
Call us, or come in about your roofing 
handle all details. No red tape. 

•Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger Kentucky 



#J.# 




STANDARD FOR OVtR 60 YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 




Mouthpiece for city news,. 
sleuth of tide 'bar features 

PAUL HUGHES . . City Editor of The Louisville Times, Is a newspaper 
veteran to whom the "Fourth Estate" is s family affair . . his three children 
f ollowinir la hit literary footsteps. Born in Adair County. Paul Is a graduate 
of Centre College, and of the University of Missouri's School of Journalism. 
f T mtf SU nnner he completed eight months' study of postwar problems at Harvard 
under s coveted Nieman Fellowship sward. 

Before Joining as seventeen years ago, Hughes worked on two St Louis papers, 
served the United Press in Chicago and New York, returned to Kentucky by 
war of Ashland, where he edited the Ashland Independent four years. In 1943 
Paul was loaned to the U. 8. Treasury Department to assist with the 3rd War 
Loan campaign in Washington. With all this, he has found time to teach Journalism 
evening classes at the University of Louisville, serves on the Mayor's inter-racial 
commission, works consistently for consolidation of city-county governments. 

The elder of Hashes* sons, formerly with Associated Press la New York. Is now s 
T/5 with the 7th Army now In France. Another son Is editor of Cento, Centre 
College newspaper, and his daughter Is with an advertising agency In New York. 
The Hughes home fs s 134-year-old one-time farm house, built when Louisville's 
population numbered 1,300. Its furnishings were collected by antique-hobbyist 
Mrs. Hughes. 

A sparkling resume of local, national 
and world news every p.m. 

TiteiouisviLLE Times 

\ / - 



To conserve coal and other war-Scarce fuels used fet power generation, die War Pro- 
duction Board has issued Utilities Order U-9 prohibiting certain uses of electricity as 
enumerated below. Although there is no shortage of electrical generating capacity, 
accumulated deficits in fuel production hare necessitated a tightening up of the na- 
tion's overall wartime fuel conservation program, and this order is one of a - 
of steps being taken to carry out this objective. 



Effective FEBRUARY 1, 1945, By WPB Order, No Electricity 
May Be Used For The Following Purposes: 



\ t Outdoor advertising and outdoor promo- 
tional lighting. 

2. Outdoor display lighting except where 
necessary for the conduct of the business 
of oasooof establishments. 

3. Outdoor detnta ti se and outdoor 
mental lighting. / 

4. Show window lighting except wbese 
for Interior illumination. 

■sate* 



X Outdoor sign sighting except fosi 



5. Marquee lighting in OB 
for each s aa i q a e s. 

6. White way street lighting in excess of 
the amount determined by local public 
authority to bo a c c essa r y foe public 
safety. 



fa) Directional or identification 
quired for fire and police 
traffic control, tr an sports! 
sals or hospitals; or d ir ec ti ona l 
identification signs for soy 
essential public services 
of which is specifically certified so 
be necessary by local public author- 
ity; * 

(b) Directional or identification signs us- 
ing not more than 60 wans per es- 
tablishment, for doctors and for ho- 
tels, and other public lodging 
lishments. 




C+i 



c 



We have been ordered by the War Production Board to request your immediate 
compliance in eliminating above prohibited uses of electricity. Althoug h the o rder 
applies specifically to outdoor commercial and municipal lighting, the WPB also 
urges you to practice maximum conservation in other uses of electricity. Remember* 
when you waste electricity you waste vital fuel, manpower and transportation facili- 
ties. Use what you meed, but need what you use. 



V 



COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



INCOMKMIAT 



SPEED FINAL VICTORY-BUY AND HOLD WAR BONDS 



T 



4L 

■» 



f 



I 



1 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



URGES SAVING OF 
TIME AND MOTION 



ENERGY SAVED CAN BE DEVOT- 
ED TO MANY EXTRA WAR- 
TIME A C T IVI T IE S REQUIRING 
ASSISTANCE. 



Busy housewives are learning 
that speedier borne work saves 
tteie and energy. This "saved" 
time and energy can be devoted to 
the many extra wartime activities 
requiring ssstrtanra, according to 
Mary Hood Oillaspie, Home Dem- 
onstration Agent. 

Many of the principles worked 
out by efficiency engineers tor sav- 
ing time and labor in war factories 
can be applied to the home. Home 
economists of the Extension Ser- 
vices in many states, studying time 
and motion, have agreed on the 
following six principles to speed 
production on the home assembly 
line: 

1. Leave out any part of the task 
you can. For example, in .J dish- 
washing scald dishes with boiling 
water and leave on rack to dry 
instead of wiping dry. Use sheets 
without ironing. Choose recipes 
requiring less time and fewer 
utensils. Cake recipes vary widely 
in the time and number of utensils 
they call for. 

3. Make one task of two or more. 
For example, when ironing pillow 
slips, towels and handkerchiefs, fold 
as you iron. In using an electric 
ironer, send several small articles, 
such at handkerchiefs, through at 
the same time, in preparing meals, 
serve foods in the dishes In which 
they baked and serve 'meat and 
vegetables on the. same platter. 

3. Make both hands work. It 
pays to learn to use both hands at 
the same time instead of overwork- 
ing the right hand. Such jobs' as 
putting away dishes, setting the 
table and dusting can be done by 
both hands at once. 

4. Keep everything in easy reach. 
Wasted steps mean wasted time 
and energy. Keep the coffee pot, 
coffee and measuring spoon or cup 
at the place where coffee is made, 
and the bread box and toaster side 
by side. Group ironing equipment 
—iron, clothes rack, hangers, and 
basket — as near the ironing board 
as possible. 

5. Use the best tool for the" task. 



mm ■■ i i i ii i 

For example, use tongs to remove 
jars and glasses from hot rinse 
water, to take baked potatoes from 
the oven, and to lift greens from 
the cooking water. A pastry blend- 
er saves time End effort In making 
biscuits and pie crust A long- 
handled dustpan prevents stoop- 
ing and saves time. 

6. Sit to work whenever you can. 
Tired backs and feet slow up work. 
Much Ironing can be done as well 
sitting as standing. A lap table 
saves effort in preparing veget- 
ables for cooking and canning. 

The majority of housewives al- 
ready follow some of these prin- 
ciples. More work can be accom- 
plished in the home and communi- 
ty if each of the six principles are 
practiced every day. 



■i . 



UNION 



Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Rachal, Cin- 
cinnati and Miss Elizabeth Lowry, 
Burlington, were" Tuesday's guests 
of Mrs. Maud N. Rachal. 

Mrs. B. L. Norman entertained 
at dinner Thursday, her relative, 
Harvey Igittendorf who was en- 
route from Portland, Oregon to his 
home in East Orange, N. J. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hicks en- 
tertained at dinner Sunday night, 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Robert Huey. 

Master Eddie Peronni, of Cincin- 
nati, was the week-end guest of 
his cousin, Miss Grace Grater. 

Mesdames Lora Mullins, R. K. 
Newman, Jimmy Carver, Charlie 
Hedges, Winston Mason, James A. 
Huey, Austin Gschwind, J. A. Foth- 
ergill and William Greenup were in 
Covington Thursday to attend the 
all day meeting of the Northern 
Kentucky Woman's Missionary 
Union at the Madison Avenue Bap- 
tist Church. 

Mrs. Harvey Hicks spent Monday 
night in Ft. Mitchell with her 
friends Mr. and Mrs: Sidney *Wyatt. 



HEBRON 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Shirley 
D. Hempfling, Supt. 

Preaching Services each first 
and third Sundays at 11 a. m. and 
7:45 p. m. 

Your church needs you and you 
need your church. 



Priming tobacco paid Adair 
county farmers well; Woodson Nell 
received $517 for 1,007 pounds, and 
Aaron Edward $457 for 1,000 
pounds. 



\ r. 




SMITH'S GROCERY 

We Deliver— Phone 74 
BURLINGTON, .t. KENTUCKY 



MOTHER'S OATS, small box 15c 3 lb. box 30c 

CREAM OF WHEAT * .".' large box 25c 

CAMPBELL'S PORK & BEANS . . p. . . 16 oz. can 10c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can . . . _ . 10 pts. per can 14c 

CORN, White, whole kernel, No. 2 can 20 pts. per can 15c 

SPINACH, No. 2 can 10 pts. per can 16c 

SWEET POTATOES, No. 3 can i ... 19c 

FRUIT COCKTAIL, No. 2 Vi can 60 pts. per can 34c 

PEACHES, No. 2y 2 can .60 pts. per can 29c 

CRANBERRY SAUCE, 16 oz. can .' .30 pts. per can 24c 

PRUNES, Sunsweet 2 ib. box 35c 

NU-MAID MARGARINE . . . . : 3 pts. per lb. 20c 

CHURNGOLD MARGARINE .., . . .3 pts. per lb 27c 

LARD, Country 2 pts. per lb." 20c 

ORANGES per ' dozen 40c 

GRAPEFRUIT, pink meat : 2 for 15c 

DELICIOUS APPLES . ner lb 12c 

BOLOGNA 3 pts. per lb. 23c 

HAM SAUSAGE .3 pts. per lb. 40c 



OWN YOUR OWN FARM - RAISE WHAT YOU EAT! 



OUT TAYLOR MILL— 5 acres; 10 

miles out. Cheap. 
8 ACRES— New stone house, base- 
ment, furnace, electric; a real 

home. 
8 ACRES— Ry land- rd.; buildings. 
62 ACRES— Lots of good buildings. 
100 ACRES— Dairy farm, 3 barns. 
110 ACRES— Nicholson. See sign. 
74 ACRES— West of Nicholson. 
20 ACRES— Off Taylor Mill; good 

buildings. 
66 ACRES— House and 2 barns. 
137 ACRES-^Just off LLL; cheap. 
83 ACRES— Near Walton; 2 houses, 

2 barns. 
110 ACRES— West of Walton; house 

and 2 barns. 
10 ACRES— Near Crittenden; a real 

buyT 
62 ACRES — East of Crittenden; 

buildings, electric. 
12 ACRES— Finer road. See sign. 
6 ACRES— Fiskburg; nice home. 
100 ACRES— Butler, Ky.; good 

buildings; cheap. 

86 ACRES-^grTm^s Lick; Hale 
farm. 

87 ACRES— Wesley Chapel; good 
buildings. 

66 ACRES— Leongburg ; good build- 
ings. 



95 ACRES— On Route 10, Western 

c Hill. 

116 ACRES— Off Route 10; Stairs' 

farm. 
OUT DIXIE— 10 acres, 10-room 

brick; 2 acres, nice 7-room buff 

brick, modern. 
8 ACRES— Dudley pike; buildings, 

nice land. 
39 ACRES — Modern chicken farm. 
62 ACRES — Charter Oak Road; 

good buildings. 
57 ACRES — Dudley; 6-room house, 

barn. I 

67 ACRES — Nice 8-room -house. 
160 ACRES— Near Dixie; all level. 
81 ACRES— On 42; colonial home. 
175 ACRES— West of Union; old 

house. 
200 ACRES — Dairy; west of Union. 
90 ACRES — West of Union; cheap. 
77 ACRES — Near Burlington; dairy 

farm. » 

147 ACRES— Bullittsviiie; a real 

farm. 
240 ACRES— North . of Burlington. 
155 ACRES— South of Burlington; 

cheap. 
120 ACRES— Near Verona; a real 

farm. 
138 ACRES— Owen County; very 

cheap. 
330 ACRES— Nea/ Mt. Zion. 



George Terrill arrived, in Hebron 
Saturday night for 80 days, after 
thirty months overseas. He is a 
brother of Mrs. Wm. Moore, of this 
community. _ 

W. R. Garnett arrived Home 
Saturday from a week's visit in 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
' Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Tanner re- 
ceived word Sunday that their 
grandson, Dale Tanner, of Erlang- 
er is 111 with scarlet fever. 

Mrs. Edwin Aylor and father Mr. 
Craig of Cincinnati, were the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Baker 
and Mrs. Nan Baker, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tanner and 
sons spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Prather and sons, of 
Covington. 

•Friend*, of Geo. Casper, Sr., of 
Ludlow, regret to learn he Is 111 in 
a hospital; He was a former res- 
ident of this community. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Acra, of Day- 
ton, O., spent the week-end with 
her mother, Mrs. Jo Graves. 

Miss Jean Elizabeth Poston was 
the week-end guest of Miss Betty 
Williams, of Ludlow. 

Mrs. Mary Utz and daughter had 
as their supper guests, Tuesday 
evening, Misses Barbara and Betty 
Schwelr. 

Several from here attended the 
W. M. U. meeting at the Madison 
Avenue Baptist Church. 

Miss Virginia Cave, of Dayton, 
Ky., spent the week-end with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Eggles- 
ton. 

Mrs. Bessie Ernst is spending sev- 
eral days with Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Ernst and family, of Hyde 
Park. 

Miss Marilyn Garnett, of Lud- 
low spent the week-end with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Gar- 
nett. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Clore and 
son, " of Covington called on Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Clore. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrod called on 
Mr. and Mrs. John Conner and son 
Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Franklin Ryle and daughter. 

Mrs. William Blaker spent Sun- 
day with Mrs. Howard Ledford and 
son. 

Mrs. Rose Crigler still remains 
very ill at the St. Elizabeth Hospit- 
al. 

Mrs. Herbert Grant and daugh- 
ter Lucy Lee spent Sunday, with 
Mr. and Mrs. Eston Snyder. 

Mrs. Wilbur Shinkle spent the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Shinkle. 

Mrs. Viola Hickey and Ted Warn- 
er called on Mr. and Mrs. S. M. 
Graves, Saturday afternoon. 

George Mobley, of Lawrence- 
burg, spent the week-end with his 
wife and son at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Hodges. 

George Terrill arrived Saturday 
from overseas and spent the night 
with his sister, Mrs. William Moore 
ajid family. 

Misses Marian and Ann Blaker 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Wilson. 

Mrs. Lee Craddock spent sever- 
al days last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. Wood Stephens, of Florence. 
Miss Jessie Gordon spent Tues- 
day with her sister, Mrs. Mamie' 
Bullock and family. ..; 

Mrs. Carvin Goodridge and fam- 
ily spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen Goodridge. 
Mary Lou Utz has the measles. 
The Hebron basketball teams 
won both games from the Burling- 
ton teams at the school house on 
Friday night. 

o- Friends of George Casper of Lud- 
low are glad to know he is improv- 
ing after a recent operation at the 
Good Samaritan Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Willis, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ray Garnett and Mr. and 
Mrs. Chas. Clore were guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Myron Garnett, Saturday 
evening. 

Mrs. Mamie Bullock and Miss 
Jessie Gordon called on Mrs. Chas. 
Riley and Mrs. Malissa Hankins on 
Thursday afternoon. 

BELLEVIEW 



THE GARDEN 



By 



LET'S START 
John S. Gardner, Kentucky 
liege of Agriculture and 
Home Economies 

The 1945 garden season is in the 
offing, to be upon jis before we 
know it. Those gardeners who are 
known for their luck In always 
having good gardens have already 
begun to plan, so that when the 
weather comes, they can become 
"activated 1 on all fronts," as the 
military might say it. 

It goes without saying that 
everybody who can should have a 
garden. It's patriotic, as home- 
grown vegetables save Just that 
many for the armed forces and for 
the war material producers, who 
must depend on commercially rais- 
ed vegetables. The job the profes- 
sional vegetable men have will be 
no easier this year than last; in 
fact, i quite possibly, on the con- 
trary. That industry Is definitely 
short-manned, and may become 
more so. 

i Growing one's own vegetables Is 
smart; it eases the budget. Or, 
put another way, a home garden- 
er may earn wages quite. compar- 
able with those of an airplane riv- 
eter. Even at pre-war prices, this 
was true. It's also smart with re- 
spect to canned vegetables, as to 
prices and ration points, and per- 
haps as to the supply there may 
be next winter. It's smart, as re- 
gards quality. Casting no asper- 
sions, shopworn vegetables may 
lack the savor of the garden-fresh 
product. It's smart.^aiway, 
have a garden. 

However, the mattejr needs to be 
approached with circumspection. 
There should not again be the hys- 
terio that drove Victory gardeners 
in 1943, and again, but less, last 
year. Then, it was learned that 
the land must be fit, or capable of 
being made so with the right fert- 
ilizer. It was learned that pests 
need to be fought, and that there 
should be at least a lend-lease ar- 
rangement whereby proper equip- 
ment could be had. 

On the other hand, it was learn- 
ed, too, that with the county ex- 
tention agents, or here at Lexing- 
ton, lies a store of information 
needing only to be tapped, that 
would make the garden a going 
concern. That information is still 
on tap, to make all 1945's gardens 
successful. To that end, too, this 
column aspires to lend all its aid, 
in the 39 weekly stories that are 
to follow. 



RIVER VIEW 




P. P. Acra and family, of Aurora, 
Ihd.. spent the week-end here with 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black,, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ray Smith called on their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Isaacs 
and son, Saturday night. 

W. B. Stephens spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with Thad-Ryle 
and family. 

Joe Black and family, of Peters- 
burg spent Sunday here with rela- 
tvies. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Craig and Lie 
Stephens, of Covington, spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Craig. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Smith, of near 
New Haven were dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black, Satur- 
day. 

W.yO. William Aylor and wlferof 
Honolulu, are spending a 30-day 
furlough with Ids parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Aylor and other rela- 
tives. 

Miss Velma Black, Cpl. Marvin 
Kelly and Mrs. Harmon Tanner 
and son Ronnie, of Erlanger were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black 
one day this week. 

E. L. Stephens, of Covington, 
called on his brother W. B. Step- 
hens one day last week. -Me also 
visited his daughter Mrs. John 
Ryle and family. 

Mrs. Gladys Sullivan spent Tues- 
day with her sister Ethel Black and 
husband and Miss Connie Black 
spent Thursday night there. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Louden enter- 
tained guests a few days last week. 



THANKS 



We the passengers, on the five 
o'clock Hebron bus, Sunday even- 
ing, January 28, wish to acknow- 
ledge our appreciation, through 
The Recorder, of the skillful way 
the bus driver, Leo Cotton, hand- 
led the bus when it slipped over 
the bank on the mile hill. 

The Appreciative Passengers. 



NOTICE 



. The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed in order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
IS miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. 



FOR SALE— One American Beauty 
iron, can.be used with Delco light 
system. Mrs. Ed Berkshire, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 2. Tel Burl. 

465-X. lt-c 



FOR SALE— One 20 International 
tractor, plows, cultivator and 
(disc; 2 wagons; 4 breaking plows 
3 riding cultivators; 1837 Ford 
panel truck, good rubber; 2 
Angus bulls, 16 months old; 8 
Red Pole cows; 1 Hereford; 3 
calves; 35 shoats. J. c. Acres, 
East Bend. t lt-p 



DEVON 



VERONA 



I can't advertise all I have but I can finance any of them. 
Don't be too late. 

REL C WAYM AN 




623 WASHINGTON ST. 
HEm. 5107 



COVINGTON 
- fed. 5064 



Mrs. Helen Rogers spent Thurs- 
day with Mrs. Edward Rogers. 

Mrs. Mae Sanford is helping care 
for Mrs. Ralph Cason, who has 
been 111 the past few days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Rogers and 
daughter and Mrs. C. R. Kite were 
shopping in Covington, Saturday. 

Mrs. Harry Aahcraft called on 
Mrs. Rod Ryle, Wednesday even- 
ing. * * 

Mrs. Stanley Stephens visited her 
daughter, Mrs. Jess Bagby several 
days last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rogers were 
overnight guests Wednesday of Mr. 
and Mrs. Louvett Rogers. ° 

Several from here Were at the 
Lexington tobacco market, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kruse and 
family were Saturday dinner guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lance Smith and 
family. 

Stevle and Phyllis Chilton, of 
Campbellsburg are visiting their 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Ashcraf t. • * ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rogers, Jr.,. 
and daughter were Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rogers, Sr., 
and family. 



Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Stewart, who 
purchased the Ben Farrell house, 
are planning to move there in the 
near future. 

Mrs. W. W. King, who has been 
ill at her home, is able to be out 
again. 

Mrs. John Boyer who has had 
the flu is able to be out again. Mr. 
Boyer returned Saturday night 
suffering from flu. Betty Lou has 
missed several days of school due 
to illness. 

A. C, Roberts Is still confined to 
his home. 

Friends of Mrs. Mary Ransom 
Alderman, formerly of Verona, now 
of Bristol, Tenn., will be glad to 
hear that she is well and is teach- 
ing school there. 

The following women from this 
community attended the quarter- 
ly meeting at Madison Avenue 
Baptist Church last week: Mrs. 
John Boyer, Mrs. Walter Renaker, 
Mrs. George Spenneberg and Mrs. 
Grover Ransom. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



Mrs. Lillie Carpenter received 
^severe burns on her foot last week. 
We wish for her a speedy recovery. 

Several from here attended the 
parade in honor of the Bishop, on 
Wednesday. 

Elmer Carpenter baled hay last 
week. 

Mr ; and Mrs. West Scott called 
on their parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Noel and Mr .and Mrs. W. 
W. Scott of Gallatin County, last 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jump and 
family moved to Covington, Satur- 
day. We regret to lose them from 
our community. 

-Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holzworth 
were in Covington Saturday even- 
ing. Their daughter Kathern re- 
turned home with them for the 
week-end. ) 



Boone Circuit Court 
No. 42421 
C. Liston Hempfling, Admr. of 
the Estate of John McCartney, 
Dec'd., . Plaintiff 

NOTICE OF CREDITORS 
The Unknown Lineal Descendants 
and Heirs at Law of John 
McCartney, Dec'd. Defendants 
All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of John McCartney, 
deceased, are hereby notified and 
required to present the same, prov- 
en as required by law, to the un- 
dersigned Commissioner, at his of- 
fice, in the Court House in Bur- 
lington, Boone County, Kentucky, 
on or before the 5th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1945 and all claims not so 
proven and presented on or before 
said date shall be forever barred. 

Given under my hand as Mast- 
er Commissioner of the Boone Cir- 
cuit Court, this January 10th, 1945. 

A. D. YELTON, 
30-3t-c Master Commissioner 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



WANTED— Logs for making sled 
crooks Can be oak, ash, walnuji 
cherry, or red elm, 12 Inches in 
diameter and over. Will pay 
good prices. Write W. A. Waters, 
Florence, Ky., or Tel. Burlington 
577. • 32-tf. 



FOR SALE— 8 Duroc Jersey gilts 
to farrow first part of March; 1 
cow with 4-week-old calf; 1 good 
work mare, weigh 1400 lbs. B. 
C. Stephens, Petersburg, Ken- 
tucky. 32-2t-p 



WANTED TO RENT— Four acres of 
tobacco, 10 or 15 acres of corn, 
and milk cows on shares. Have 
no team or tools. Can furnish 
reference. Write Box 44, Union, 
Ky. - it-p 



LOST— Female fox hound, black, 
brown and white spotted, Dec. 24, / 
1944, near Woolper Creek; witlW 
Joe Black name on callar. Re- 
ward $5.00. Notify Mr. H. F. 
Cummins, Route 1, Petersburg, 
Ky. 32-2t-p 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your ear and pays all 
legal damage claims, pins medic- 
al and hospital service costs to 
yon, family or guests If injured. 
Prompt service. Save cash. 
Walter Games, Petersburg; Joe 
Dringenburg, Florence; Ryle Ew- 
bank, Warsaw, Ky. ofebftg 



RABBIT HASH HOMEMAKERS 

The Rabbit Hash Homemakers 
met with Mrs. Jack Purdy on Wed- 
nesday, January 24th with five 
members and seven visitors pres- 
ent. Miss Glllaspie and Mrs. Lou 
POpe were with us. Mrs. Pope gave 
a very interesting lesson on "Gar- 
ment Remodeling and had quite a 
few patterns that were interesting 
to all. 

Plans were made and donations 
of eggs and sugar taken for Angel 
Food cakes to be sent to the army 
hospital at Ft. Thomas. Mrs. Mar- 
ion Bishop's name was added to 
our membership list. 

The next meeting wiH be held 
February 28. The lesson will be 
"Room Improvement." - 

Mrs. O. W. Purdy, Reporter 



RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121. 509 Scott 
St. tf 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road. This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf. 



WANTED— Tenant to tend 115 
acres, good land, Boone County; 
plenty water. Must have team, 
tools and sufficient help to raise 
4% acres of tobacco, 15 acres corn 
15 acres hay; milk cows optional. 
E. Scherf , 860 Dixie Highway, Er- 
langer, Ky. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE — Fresh cows. Howard 
Bregel, 1 mile past New Haven 
School, U. S. 42. 31-2t-c 



FOR SALE— 1 Oliver riding culti- 
vator; 1-horse corn drill; Oliver 
.20 breaking plow. R. L. Wilson, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 751. 31-2p 



WANTED-^omeone to put hickory 
split bottoms in several chairs. 
Call or write Wm. Hagedorn, 858 
Dixie Highway, Erlanger, Ky. Tel 
Erl. 6106. lt-c 

FOR SALE— One extra good 7 -year- 
old team of horses, weigh 1550 
lbs; sound, single line and per- 
fect workers. John Delahunty, 
Florence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 305. 32-2c 



FOR SALE— 13 Shoats weigh 35 or 
40 pounds. Carl Dameron, Flor- 



ence, Ky., R. 1. 



31-2t-c 



FOR RENT— 1% acres tobacco 
ground; team and tools furnish- 
ed. W. T. Rudiclll, Burlington, 
Ky. 31-2t-p 



WANTED— Man with small family 
to raise 3.5 acres of tobacco and 
work by day. B. C. Stephens, 
Petersburg, Ky. 31-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Fresh Jersey cow with 
calf; also good 3-year-old horse, 
broke. Baker Bros. Tel. Walton 

285. 31-2t 



MUCH HOME CANNING 

IN CAMPBELL COUNTY 

New food ration point values are 
probably of little concern to farm- 
ers in Campbell county where 
homemakers canned 109,908 quarts 
of fruit last year, along with 135,- 
468 quarts of vegetables and 13,975 
quarts of meat. Then they brined 
7,668 gallons of vegetables, 1,897 
gallons of meat, 128 gallons of 
fruit, and stored 30,634 pounds of 
vegetables and 27,264 pounds of 
fruit. 



BOONE CO. FARMS 



Phenothiazine has been used by 
approximately tbfee-fourths of the 
sheepmen in Spencer county. 

Madison county farmers hauled 
and spread 18,300 tons of lime 
during the 12 months ending Dec. 
; 1,1944. 



as 54 ACRES— 1 mile from Burlington, on Highway 18, 1.8-acre 
tobacco base; 5-room house, electric, furnace, water in 
kitchen, sink, barn, meat house, crib, 2 poultry houses; 
two-thirds tractor land .$6000.00 

LARGE BRICK BUILDING at Petersburg, on main corner, in 
good repair. Three large rooms on ground floor, large 
room on second floor. Building 40x60. Basement, 
cistern. Wired for electric. Will sell cheap. Make 
offer. Could be used as a business building or cut 
into living quarters. 

100 ACRES— 7-room house, 2 barns, electric. The tobacco crop 
this year sold for over $2000.00 .- $6000.00 

130 ACRES— On Ohio River, 3.2 acres tobacco base, 6-room 

house, 3- room house, 3 barns, silo $8500.00 

142 ACRES— Ohio River, all bottom land of best quality; 5- 
room house, basement, furnace, bath; 2 large barns, 
large crib; 5-room tenant house $21,000.00 

50 ACRES— iy 2 miles from Burlington on blacktop road; barn; 
no houseV. $3500.00 

= 132 ACRES — 1 mile from Burlington, about 20 acres in good 
bearing apple- orchard. All level tractor land; 5-room 
house, electric, 2 good barns. Well fenced; 2 ponds. 
In one family over 100 years . $13,000.00 

= 131 ACRES — West of Union, 3.6 acres tobacco base; 3-room 

house, electric, large dairy barn , $8850.00 

55 150 % ACRES — West of Union, 5 acres tobacco base; 6-room 

| house, 3-room tenant house, dairy and tobacco barn; 

sr stanchions for 16 cows; other buildings ..... .$7,500.00 

174 ACRES — 3 acres tobacco base; not a good location; old 
house; well watered, good land 7. . .$4500.00 

-," — All of these farms can be financed. 

1 A. B. RENAKER 



= TEL. OFFICE 12 



' BURLINGTON, KY. 

J. G. SMITH, 83 



RES. 55 s= 



1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Four 
building lots, located in Carp- 
enter subdivision, Florence. Price 
$500 or will trade for cows or 
heifers. R. E. Eubanks, Ludlow, 

Ky., R. 2. 31-8t-pd. 

- 

LOST — A_ and B gasoline coupons 
with license number 47-780. Ivan 
Ryle, Burlington, Ky., R. 2. 31-2p 

DAIRY COWS— 24 Holstein, To 
Browft Swiss, 4 Guernseys; these 
are all record Wisconsin cows 
with plenty of quality; all T. B. 
and Bang tested. 50 head of 
mares and horses, aged 4 to 6 
years; all good chunks with 
plenty of quality; CHEAP. All 
stock guaranteed. A week's trial 
given. Easy payments can be 
arranged. Hog feed, $1.75 per 100 
lbs. GENERAL l)I8TRIBUTORS, 
30 East Second St., Covington, 
Ky. Open Sunday. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Good young work 
hores, work anywhere. Cheap. 
E. Y. Randall, Burlington, Ky., R. 
1. Tel. Burl. 357. 31-2t-p 

FOR SALE— Stayman Winesap 
apples. Bring basket. Wm. H. 
Moore, Hebron, Ky. Tel. Hebron 
115. . 30-3t-c 



FOR SALE— Two bird dogs, point- 
ers. Mrs. S. B. Faulkner, Hebron, 
Ky. Tel. 175. 30-3t-c. 



WANTED— HAY; will buy a con- 
siderable quantity. General Dis- 
tributors, 30 East Second Street* 
Covington, Ky. lt-c 



FOR SALE— 1931 Ford coupe. Mrs. 
Stella Gaines, Petersburg, Ky. 

lt-c 



FOR SALE — Nine- milch cows, some 
fresh now, other to freshen soon. 
John Burton, Florence, Ky., R. 
1. Tel. Flor. 725. lt-c. 



FOR SALE— Fresh cow with sec- 
ond calf by side. Lawrence 
Barnes, Petersburg, Ky., R. 1. 

32-2t-p 



FOR SALE — Coal range cook stove, 
green and ivory color, with steel 
tpp. Linnie Busby, Florence, Ky. 
Tel. Flor. 491. lt-pd 



FOR SALE— Cow and calf. Ed 
Baker near Hebron. Tel. Hebron 
114. - lt-pd 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Five beef- 
type cows, to begin freshening 
in March, by a purebred Here- 
ford bull. Will trade for milch 
cows. R. L. Bowman, Ludlow, Ky. 
R.2. Tel. Heb. 137 32-2t-c 

FOR SALE— Team of farm horses, 
gelding and mare. Cheap. E. 
Grater, Union, Ky. Tel. Flor- 
ence 293. 32-tf 



FOR SALE— Team of sorrel horses, 
well broke, weigh 1200 lbs.. 4 and 
5 years old; also light brood 
mare, 9 years old. Will sell or 
trade. B. W. Brink, U. S. 42, 1 
mile south of New Haven School 
building. 31-2t-c. 



WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLBY TO- 
BACCO SEED at Gulley and 
Pettlt's, Burlington; B. F. Elliott, 
Walton; Walter Renaker, Verona 
or by mall. $1.50 per oz, 75c per 
»/ 2 oz. Clay Bedford, Cynthlana, 
Ky. 29-4t-c 



FOR WELL DRILLING— Call ' or 
write Hubert Farrls, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Work guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 

HAULING— Specializing In live- 
stock. Call Dixie 7698, ask for 
Carl. 23-tf 



INCREASE YOUR PROFTTB WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. PuUorum 
controlled. Improved tor years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. o. P. sired matings. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm 
on shares. Tenant to furnish 
work stock and tools. Reference 
required. J. H. Huey, Petersburg, 
Ky. Tel. Burl. 238. 24-tf. 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 
W; M. STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington, COlonial 1121. tf. 



BE SAFE— BUY NOW 

SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY 

BEDROOM SUITES 




Avenue Furniture Co. 

501 Madison,, Cov. HE. .273 
MOBS FOB TOUR MONEY 



< 



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the Boone county Recorder 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



VOLUME 69 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February s, txz 



""^* 



^w 




.g*... ;■ ,' • ■ — , — ■...-■■-*- 



PETERSBURG MAN 
DIES OF INJURIES 



RECEIVED WHEN STRUCK BY 
GAB EARLY SUNDAY MORNING 
HEAR HEBRON— BAD STOPPED 
TO HELP MOTORIST. 



Homemakers Urged 



To Protect And Save 
Woolen Garments 



ORGANIZATION 






MEETINGS HELD 



Florence P.-T. A. Will 

Present Comedy Feb. 9 



CAMPAIGN HAS 



James Afcertson, 89, of Peters 
burg was struck and killed by an 
automobile driven by Harry Lee 
Aylor early Sunday morning on 
Highway 20, near Hebron. 

Deputy Sheriff Irvin Rouse, who 
was called to the scene of the ac- 
cident stated that Mr. Albertson 
had stopped his car on the high- 
way to help three men from Idle- 
wild who were changing a tire. 

According to Deputy Rouse, Al- 
bertson was thrown approximately 
50 feet when struck by the car. 

Aylor, driver of the car which 
struck Albertson did not stop, but 
called at the Sheriff's office Mon- 
day, after hearing an announce- 
ment over the radio that the driv- 
er of the car was being sought by 
authorities. He stated that he 
did not realize that his car had 
struck a. man. 

Aylor was charged with man- 
slaughter and leaving the scene of 
an accident. At a hearing Tues- 
day afternoon in Judge Cropper's 
Court, he was fined on a charge of 
leaving the scene of an accident. 
His attorney waived examining trial 
and the case was held for action 
of the April grand Jury. He was 
recognized under bond to appear 
at the April term of Boone Cir 
cult Court. 

The commonwealth waa repre- 
sented In the trial by County At- 
torney Chas. W. Riley and the de- 
fendant was represented by James 
Rogers, Covington attorney. 

Mr. Albertson" is survived by four 
daughters, Mrs. Margaret Croust, of 
Park Hills, and Betty Jo, Olive and 
Mary Ann Albertson, all'of Peters- 
burg; three sons, James E., John 
N. and Elmer A. Albertson, of Pet- 
ersburg; his father, George Albert- 
son of Covington; three sisters Mrs. 
Nola Gorman and Miss Nina Al- 
bertson, of Covington and Mrs. 
Ruby Thoss, of Pensacola, Pla., and 
one grandchild. 

Growers Qualifying 

Ton Per Acre Club 



The following growers reported 
sales the past week that exceeded 
a ton of tobacco per acre. Their 
fertilizer practices are given below: 

Charles L. Kelly, Burlington, 2 
acres, 4518 lbs., average 2259; var- 
iety, Stafford's Golden Burley; 
fertilizer per acre, turned under 
barley and vetch, 12 to 15 loads 
manure, 300 lbs. phosphate, 400 lbs. 
complete fertilizer, 200 lbs. ammo- 
nium nitrate. 

. J. C. Benton, Walton, 8 acres, 
17,100 lbs., average 2139 lbs; var- 
iety, Golden Burley; fertilizers per 
acre, turned under grass sod, 12 to 
' 15 loads manure, 500 lbs. phos- 
phate, 400 lbs. complete fertilizer, 
100 libs, ammonium nitrate. 

Wilton Stephens, Burlington 1.3 
acres, 2796 lbs., average 2150 lbs.; 
variety 41 A; fertilizers, per acre, 12 
to 15 loads manure, phosphate and 
lime, 150 lbs. ammonium nitrate, 
500 lbs. complete' fertilizer. 

Growers equalling or exceeding a 
ton of tobacco per acre are urged 
to give the County Agent's office 
a list of the fertilizers and vari- 
ety practices followed. 

PRODUCERS URGED 
HIE FOR SUBSIDY 

PAYMENT FOR NOVEMBER AND 
DECEMBER — PA YMENT WILL 
BE AT BATE OF. 79c PER 199 
POUNDS OF WHOLE MILK. 



• 



Producers are urged to file their 
application for the Dairy Feed Sub- 
sidy Payment for November and 
December, not later than February 
28, 1945. This Is the closing date 
for filing for this period. 

The payment will be at the rate 
of 7«(J per hundred pounds for 
whole milk and lie per pound for 
butterfat. The same rate of pay 
will be made for the next period 
which will be for -the months of 
January, February and March. Ap- 
plications for this period should 
not be made until all weights for 
milk and butterfat are complete 
for the three months. 

No announcement has been. re- 
ceived regarding the conttmiatton 
of this payment after March, but 
If it should be continued, applica- 
tions will be filed for a three- 
month period. 



i Housewives will feel repaid for 
all efforts they make for woolen 
garments to wear longer. Unex- 
pected developments on the war 
fronts bring changes in the woolen 
and worsted situation, according 
to Mary Hood Gillasple, Home 
Demonstration Agent. The re- 
quirements of the armed services 
for woolen and worsted fabrics 
have increased greatly the last two 
months. 

All "wool top" produced between 
December 31, 1944 and May 15, 
1945 must be used only to fill rated 
military orders. This includes all 
wool except that used In carpet 
wool or mohair. The processing of 
any wool top is prohibited except 
to fill rated orders during the 
same period. 

Patriotic civilian worsteds, top- 
coats, and men's suits in particul- 
ar wfll be staying on the Job as 
long as possible to save wool and 
labor man hours. 

Clothing specialists of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture offer 
these suggestions to help make a 
coat or suit wear longer: 

Give it the brush-off— and the 
air: Brush wool clothes often, in 
the direction of the grain of the 
cloth, inside and out, and in and 
around pockets and cuffs. Air 
them occasionally— outdoors when 
weather permits. 

Hang it straight: Save the 
press by putting clothes on hang- 
ers as soon as removed. If lack- 
ing a trousor hanger or wooden 
hanger with cross bar, fold a piece 
of heavy cardboard over a wire 
hanger to hold trousers. 

Keep It clean: Regular cleaning 
before clothes become badly soiled 
lengthen wear. Before pressing 
clothes at home, remove spots— a 
warm iron may "set" them so they 
will never come out. Steam press 
with a moderately hot Iron— too 
hot an iron may scorch even thru 
a pressing clothing. ' 

Protect from pests: Winter Is 
not a dosed season for clothes 
moths or carpet beetles, so play 
safe by using moth balls, flakes, or 
crystals— and keep stored wools 
sealed in paper or airtight boxes, 
chests or closets. 

Put in reinforcements: New 
coats or suits, or good ones taken 
out of moth balls in readiness for 
returning service men, can be re- 
inforced by sewing in protective 
underarm shields, knee and seat 
retreads, and "wear guards" on 
trouser legs. 

Mend it in time: Tiny hole/ are 
easier to hide than big holes. A 
thin place reinforced may never 
break through. 

Repair with care: Directions for 
making professional-looking re- 
pairs in men's or women's suits and 
coats— mending worn collar rolls, 
sleeve linings, trouser cuffs or 
pocket edges— are included in 
"Mending Men's Suits," M. P. 482, 
available free from the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Washing- 
ton 25, D. C. This illustrated bull- 
etin also includes Instructions for 
making suit alterations and put- 
ting in protective shields, retreads 
and wear guards. 

The following suggestions apply 
to other woolens: 

1. Because the shock of freezing 
shrinks and hardens wools, it Is 
usually best to dry woolen wash- 
ables Indoors in cold weather. 

2. A third sheet over wool bed- 
ding makes a useful dust cover and 
adds warmth, since it holds still 
air in the fluffy wool. 

3. If wool clothes get wet or 
muddy, dry them slowly at room 
warmth— never close to a stove or 
radiator— and brush clean whep 

ary - * *. * 

4. When a wool garment gets a 

rest after a day or two of wear, 
the wool springs back and some 
wrinkles drop out, so less pressing 
is needed. 

6. To "block" a new or newly- 
washed hand-knit, garment, here is 
an easy method;,.-, Sprinkle two 
heavy bath towel*:, slightly and 
spread the garment between them, 
pulling to desired measurements 
and pinning to' shape. (Before 
washing, it is handy to lay garm- 
ent on paper or cloth and draw 
outline to use in reateap^tf Oar- 
er with a board or other firm, flat 
surface. Weight- this down and 
leave until the garment is dry. A 
light steam-pressing— w i t h o u t 
mashing— also gives knits a finish- 
ed look. 



BY TWELVE 4-H CLUBS IN COUN- 
TY— 4-H PROJECT REQUIRE- 
MENTS WILL BE RAISED THIS 
YEAR. 



Twelve community 4-H Clubs 
will hold 1945 organization meet- 
ings during the next two Weeks, 
according to the County Agent's 
office. The clubs will organize in 
cooperation with the schools and 
with the help of local adult lead- 
ers. 

In most Instances, 4-H project 
requirements will be raised this 
year with members keeping more 
complete records on their war time 
projects. Better farm and home 
practices and war food and fiber 
production will be stressed this 
year. 

The -dates for the community 
club organization meetings are as 
follows: 
Grant, February 5th 9:00 a. m. 
Petersburg, February 5th, 11:00 
a. m. 
New Haven, Feb. 5, 2:30 p. m. 
Burlington (colored), February 8 
at 11:00 a. m. 
Burlington, Feb. 6th, 2:00 p. m. 
Hebron, Feb. 13th, 11:25 a. m. 
Constance, Feb: 13th, 3:00 p. m. 
Hamilton, Feb. 16th, 9:00 a. m. 
Florence, Feb. 16, 2:45 p. m. 
Verona, Feb. 19th, 1:00 p. m. 
Walton, Feb. 19th, 3:00 p. m. 
Four-H Club work is for all boys 
and girls who are Interested In 
learning improved farm and home 
practices by doing or carrying out 
the actual projects studied. Mem- 
bers are organized into project 
groups and community clubs so 
that they may have greater oppor- 
tunities in their work. The 4-H 
age is from 10 to 18 years Inclusive 
with occasional younger members 
enrolled where there are, special 
Interests. 

Successful 4-H Club project work 
involves a four fold combination 
inclu ding the member and his pro- 
ject, t&rparehts who supervise the 
home work, the adult leaders who 
organize and supervise the com- 
munity activities and the County 
Extension offices that assist in 
supplying additional educational 
information and organization. 
Plans are being made for making 
1945 the most successful 4-H Club 
year on record. 



A delightful **o-act comedy, 
with music, will be presented at 
the Florence Sohogt'by the P.-T. A. 
on Friday, FebruatF 9th. The play 
deals with the riotous comic antics 
of Magnolia, who £ a grown-up 
Topsy. 

The scenes take place at an ex- 
clusive finishing school for young 
ladles in Kentucky about 1852. Tie 
songs that are sung, are the songs 
of that period— tike 
Stephen Foster tunfcs. 

The play is 



SEEN EXTENDED 



IN INFANTILE PARAL1 
TO FEBRU ARY 
MENT WEATHER HAS 
BRED PROGRESS OF DRIVE. 




The closing date of the Infantile 
Paralysis campaign has been ex- 
well known v tended to February 15th, because 
] hi nearly all sections- of the coun- 
especially written' try the drive has been hampered 



not navel ■ •• i • r. 

rreseni nay 
Saturday, Ftfc. l«k 



BURNS FATAL TO 
NATIVE OF COUNTY 



for groups with Waited facilities 
and promises a tcry enjoyable 
evening for those who attend. 

The receipts of the play will go 
to the AAF Convalescent Hospital 
in Ft. Thomas, Ky. * 

The cast of characters follows: 

Magnolia, Mary's birthday pres- 
ent, Miss Clara Watts. 

Miss Lurcetia Fruzzelfranz, a 
spinster, owner of the school, Mrs. 
W. H. Jones. 

Mary Carver, student of the 
school, Mrs. Elbert Cook. 

Lucy Weston, student of the 
school, Mrs Ralph Stith. 
Susy Barret, student of the school, 
Mrs. Lloyd Rouse. 

Nancy Ashton, student of the 
school, Mrs. Claude Orchelle. 

Mandy, head housekeeper for the 
school, Mrs. Wm. Markesbery. 

Ross, chief cook, Mrs. Sarah 
Lusher. 

Mrs. Steel, Miss Lucretia's sister, 
Mrs. Robt. Horton. 

Colonel Chas. Morgan, W. H. 



Jones. 
Chorus, slaves, guests, students. Mrs. John B. Walton, 
— ' inond Hightower. 



by rain, snow, ice and fuel short- 
ages. Mr. Basil O'Connor, presi- 
dent said that it was unfair to the 
thousands of victims of last sum- 
mer's epidemic to close the drive 
now when the weather has pre- 
vented many affairs designed to 
raise money for them. 

The following Is a list of the com- 
munity chairmen and their own 
committee. 

Hebron: Chester Ooodridge, 
chairman, Norma McGlasson, BHlie 
Harrod, Violet Edwards, Voilet 
Hodges, Zelpha Nichols, Mary Fow- 
ler, Kathleen Goodridge, Mary 
Reinhart, Betty Holt, Barney Ho- 
gan, Melvln McGlasson, Ruth 
Bradford, Mary Bessler, George 
Bullock, Lyman Oliver. 

Constance: Mrs. Ruth Kottmyer 
Huey, chairman, Miss Thelma 
Heist, Mrs. James Clayton, Mrs. 
Manlius Goodridge, Miss Emma 
Jean Austin, Miss Virginia Earl 
McGlasson. — — 

Burlington: Mrs. Helen Snyder, 
chairman, Mrs. Kirtley Cropper, 

Mrs. Ray- 



On Saturday evening, February 
10 at eight o'clock the New Haven 
P.-T. A. will present an outstand- 
ing comedy, "The Absent Minded, 
Bridegroom-" Tins capital comedy 
of the Irish-American life baa not 
a dull moment and scarecly a 
ous one. 

As the story goes, on the eve of 
his marriage with the Widow 
Rooney, Thn Shea gets an acute 
attack of cold feet and begs his 
crony to rescue him from impend' 
ing matrimony. Then the trouble 
starts and with character like 
Harry L. Kirby taking the lead 
with an Irish brogue in the part 




FLORENCE — SERVICES 
SATURDAY. 



— 

Sirs. Emma Freeman, «, of 551 
r. 12th Street, CoringtoA n* 
of Boone County, and a former : 
ident of Florence, was burned fat- 
ally Thursday when her clo t hing 
caught fire as she waa atte m pti ng 
to start a Are hi a coal stove at 
her home. 

When her clothing caught fire, 
Mrs. r ii «an who was alone in 



of the "Absent-Minded Bride- L^ j^^ a t that time, grabbed 
groom," and Mrs. Norman L. La*)- -j^^ ^ bed clothing to smother. 



FARM MEETING 
DATES ARE SET 



WILL OFFER UNUSUAL OPPOR- 
TUNITY TO DISCUSS TIMELY 
AND IMPORTANT FARM PROB- 
LEMS. 



- * 



Petersburg Boy 

In California Hospital 

Robert C. Weindel, a native of 
Petersburg, now serving in the 
Merchant Marines had his ship 
sunk by the Japs at Leyete in the 
Philippines. He suffered a broken 
arm, but was rescued. He is now 
in the Pasadena Station Hospital, 
Pasadena, Calif. 



BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 



Mrs. Hildreth Dolwick was gra- 
ciously entertained at the home of 
her son and daughter-in-law Wed- 
nesday evening. The celebration 
was in honor of her 50th birthday 
and her brother John Conrad pre- 
sented her with a beautifully white 
decorated cake, bearing 50 pink, 
candles. 

A delicious supper was served at 
8:30, and those enjoying the even- 
ing were: Mr. and Mrs. Frank Mc- 
Glasson, Mr. and Mrs. John Dol- 
wick, Mr. and Mrs. C. Robinson, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Wernz, Mr 
and Mrs. Adam Dolwick, Miss Mab- 
el Dolwick, John Conrad, Mrs. Be- 
lew, Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Snyder, Mr. 
and Mrs; Edgar Snyder, the honor 
guest Mrs. Hildreth Dolwick and 
Mr. and Mrs. JJal B. Dolwick and 
family. < 

Several nice presents were re- 
ceived by Mrs. Dolwick and all left 
at a late hour wishing her many 
more happy birthdays. 



February dates for important 
meetings planned by farmers thru 
their community programs have 
been set, according to H. R. Fork- 
ner, County Agent. The county- 
wide meetings will be held as fol- 
lows: 

Truck Crops Meeting— February 
6th at 7:45 p. m. at Constance 
School. Discussion leader, John S. 
Gardner, College of Agriculture. 

Market Outlook Meetings— Feb- 
ruary 8th at 1:30 pPm. at Burling- 
ton courihouse. G. P. Summers. 
Market Outlook Specialist, discus- 
sion, leader. 

Hog Meetings— Burlington court- 
house, Tuesday, February 20th at 
1 :30 p. m. Prof. R. W. Pifer, of Col- 
lege of Agriculture, Lexington. 

Dairy and Feed Crops— Burling- 
ton courthouse, February 27th at 
10:00 a. m. to 3:00 p. m. Discussion 
leaders, Lynn Copeland, dairy spec- 
ialist and Wm. C. Johnstone, crops 
field agent from the College. 

Fruit Meetings— February 28th at 
10:00 a. m. and 1:00 p. m., W. W. 
MagiU, orchard field agent, discus- 
sion leader. Field meetings will be 
held in Burlington and Constance 
communities. 

Farm Bureau Meeting— February 
23rd at 7:30 p. m., Burlington 
school. 

These meetings will offer farm- 
ers an unusual opportunity to dis- 
cuss and hear discussed some of 
the most timely important farm 
problems. February, a month bs- 
fore spring work, starts, offers 
farmers the bes\lfcpportunlty to 
study their farm plans.! All farm- 
ers are invited and urged ot at- 
tend. 



TAXPAYEBS REMINDED 

OF DEADLINE MARCH 15 



Israel Aron, 32 East Seventh St 
Covington, reminds Income taxpay- 
ers that March 15 Is the last day 
for filing 1044 returns. He sug- 
gests in his announcement in this 
issue of The Recorder, that It is 
better to file soon and avoid the 
last minute rush. 



Home Economics 4-H 
Project Work To 
Be Started In County 

Project Instruction In Home Ec- 
onomics 4-H work will start im- 
mediately following community 
club organization, project groups 
wli have then* first class the sec- 
ond week in February according to 
Mary Hood Gillasple, Home Dem- 
onstration Agent. 

Girls 10 to 21 years old may be- 
long to the 4-H Club. Home Ec- 
onomics instruction will be given 
at project group meetings by an 
adult leader. A member may en- 
i roll in one or more of the follow- 
ing projects: Clothing, foods, 
canning, home labor servJeo and 



Florence: Dr. Thomas Lutes, 
chairman, Mr. John Martin, Miss 
Doris Jean Taylor, Miss Allee Woods 
Miss Anna Mae Simms, Miss Jo 
Ann Aeubaum, Mrs. Sitobia Relmer, 
Mrs. O. R. Ossman, Renaker Mill- 
er. 

Richwood: Mrs. Grace Ahdon, 
chairman. 

Beaver: Mrs. John Lewis Fagin, 
chairman, Mrs. Alice Slayback, 
Mrs. Alice Johnson, Mrs. Ruby 
Woods, Mrs. Dorothy Houston. 

Big Bone, Hamilton,; Rabbit 
Hash: Mrs. J> C. Acrec, cha i r ma n , 
Mrs. Lew Williamson, Mrs. Cliff 
Stephens, Mrs. Jack Bodie, Mrs. J. 
C. Acree, Mrs. Leonard Riggs, Mrs. 
Everett Jones, Mrs. Ed Shinkle, Mr. 
Bob Black, Mrs. Russell Miller, Rev. 
Sam Hogan, Mr. Tom Huff. 

Verona: Mrs. Will McCormlck, 
chairman, Miss Lizzie Vest, Mrs. 
Grace Brewster. 

Belleview and McVllle: Mrs. 
Etna McNeely, chairman, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Rogers, Mrs. Allen Rogers, 
Mrs. Martha Wolfe. 

Bulllttsville: Mrs. Chas. Engle, 
chairman, Mrs. Burnam Roberts, 
Mrs. Eunie Marshall, Mr. John 
Whitaker. 

Petersburg: Mrs. Oleva Dolph, 
chairman, Mrs. Hal Snow, Mrs. 
Enoch White, Mrs. Walter Gaines, 
Miss Gladys Klopp, Mr. Lawrence 
Chambers. 

Walton: Mrs. Allen Gaines, chair- 
man, Mrs. Mabel Stansifer, Mrs. 
Louis Schwab. 

Taylorsport: Mrs. Earl More- 
head, chairman, June Morehead. 

Union: Mrs. Ed Grater, chair- 
man, Mrs. H. R. Anderson, Mrs. 
Harry Kirby, Mrs. N. W. Lalbley, 
Mrs. Louise Newman. 

An effort has been made to have 
each person In the county contact- 
ed, according to Mrs. Elizabeth 
Goodridge Nestor, director of the 
campign, but if you have been ac- 
cidentally missed, please look up 
your local chairman and give him 
or her a contribution, for this 
dread "disease might attack your 
child or the child of someone dear 
to you. If you have received one 
of the March of Dimes cards, fill It 
and send it in. 



ly as the Widow Rooney, who has 
her wedding planned for this June 
day, there cannot be a funnier pier 
produced. 

Other outstanding characters are 
played by James Stephenson, .who 
is a rollicking youth that imper- 
sonates Mrs. Peterson; Mrs. Austin 
Gschwin# the calamity-howling 
maid nicknamed Poison Ivy; Joe 
Ryan, the hard-boiled detective; 
Ivan Clements, the scheming Irish- 
man; and the lovers whose parts 
are ably played by Mary Cecil 
Ryan, Norma LaJbly, and George 
William Ryan. 

This is a royalty play and prom- 
ises to be one of the best which 
the New Haven P.-T. A. has ever 
produced. Don% fall to see this 
performance. Mrs. John Masters is 
directing the cast. 

Tickets are on sale now. Any 
high school student can secure 
them for you. General admission 
25c and 35c, reserve seats 45c. 



pieces 

the flames .arid ran Into the rear 
yard at her home, where she was 
found by firemen. She was re- 
moved to Booth Hospital, where she 
died several hours later. 

Mrs. Freeman's flaming clothing 
set the house on fire. 

She is survived by two daughters 
Mrs. Joyce Jones, Covington » na 
Mrs. Harry Auldridge, Covington; 
a son, William B. Freeman, Louis- 
vffle; seven grandchildren and 14 
great-grandchildren. 

Funeral services were held Sat- 
urday at 2:30 p. m. at the Tharp & 
Stith funeral home, Florence, with 
Rev. Elmer Kidwell, pastor of the 
Florence Methodist Church offici- 
ating. Burial was in Florence Cem- 
etery. 






Richardson-Conrad 



■ 



Infant King 



Mr. and Mrs. Earl Richardson, 
of Burlington, announce the mar- 
riage of their daughter, Elotta, to 
Dallas Conrad, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ivan Conrad, also of Burlington, 
which was solemnized January 27 
at the home of Rev. Roy Johns©* 
in Covington, Ky. 

Their attendants were Mr. and 
Mrs. James Richardson, Mary 
Chipley and Russell Conrad. 

Following the ceremony, a sup- 
per was held at the groom's home. 

The couple are residing with the 
bride's parents at the present 



The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert King died Saturday. Febru- 
ary 3, at St. Elizabeth Ho s pit a l 

Mr. and Mrs. King residence on 
the- Burlington-Florence Pike Just 
west of Hopeful Road. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Tharp & Stith funeral home, Flor- 
ence, Sunday at 2:00 p. m. with 
Rev. Eggleston officiating. Burial 
was in Hopeful Cemetery. 

N. C. White Prontoted 
To Rank Of 



Black-Kelly 



f 0^ 



Local Girl Elected to 
Office Of Repi 
* At Georgetown College 

Miss Sylvia Corlnne Walton, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Walton, Burlington, Ky., has been 
elected freshman representative on 
.the Women's Self-Government 
Board of Georgetown College. The 
Board is composed Of all the girls 
in the college aad enforces the liv- 
ing regulations lor college women. 
Officers are -elected by popular 
vote. . ' 

Miss Walton was Valedictorian of 
her high school graduating class, 
president of the Junior and Senior 
classes, president of the 4-H Club, 
and a member of the high school 
band for three years. 

Since she enrolled as a freshman 

at Georgetown In September, Cor- 

inhe has become a member of the 

room improvemewtt Anyone who islGeorgetonlan staff,. girls glee club 



Florence Boy Returns 

From South Pacific Area 



not in school and wishes to be a 
4-H member is urged to contact 
Mary Hood Gillasple, Burlington, 
or the community club president. 



Marine Corps Air 
Calif.— Marine Staff 
old Booth Shepherd, 2«, son «f Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Blaine Shepherd, of 
Route 1, Florence, Ky., has return- 
ed here from the South and Cen- 
tral Pacific where he was an avi- 
ation mechanic with the "Hell 
Hounds" a fighter sqttadrjm^wJJb, 



The home of Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
mon Tanner of Erlanger was the 
scene of a very pretty wedding on 
Wednesday evening at five o'clock, 
when Miss Velma Lee Black daugh- 
ter of H/enry Black and Pvt. Marvin 
KeUy, son of Wilbur Kelly, of Wal- 
ton, were united in marriage. 

The double ring ceremony was 
performed by Rev. Bond, pastor of 
the Erlanger Baptist Church in the 
presence of the bride's parents and 
a few close relatives and friends. 
The bride was lovely In a suit of 
light blue with dark accesso r i e s, 
and carried a bouquet of rosebuds. 
The groom was attired in his uni- 
form. Misses Barbara aad Max- 
ine Morgan were the only attend- 
ants. 

immediately following the cere 
mony the bride and groom and 
their relatives *were entertained 
with a lovely six o'clock candle- 
light wedding supper at Doc's Place 
in Erlanger. Those present were 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Black, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ray Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Har- 
mon Tanner, Mrs. Nora Buschel- 
mann, Misses Barbara and Maxine 
Morgan, Mrs. Paul Setters, Charley 
Trapp and the bride and groom 
Pvt. and Mrs. Marvin Kelly. 

After a fifteen-day furlough the 
groom will leave for Camp Atter 
bury, Did. 

The groom has been In the ser- 
vice for eighteen months, having 
saw action overseas, being serious- 
ly wounded hi both legs. 

After the war the happy young 
couple plan to make their home in 
Erlanger. 



H. C. White, son of Mr. and Mrs. 

Cam White was promoted to the 
rank of Major. Major White la 
a graduate of Burlington High 
School and attended U. of C, Cin- 
cinnati and University of Ken- 
tucky. 

He entered service hi 1941, re- 
ceived his basic training at Ft. 
Leonard Wood, Mo., and attended 
Officers' Candidate School in IMS, 
receiving his commission in April. 
In July 1043 he was promoted to 
the rank of Captain. 

Major White, wife and baby re- 
side on the post at Ft. Belvoir, 
Va. 



Banks And County 

Offices Closed 



Banks throughout the 

__ j _n i _««_«— _411 \ 

turn <kU uiuut/ vtnkw ***** • 

Monday, February 12th in' 
anee of Lincoln's birthday, it 
announced this weak. 
February 33 will be 
holiday at which time 
birthday will be obse r ve d . 




Mr. and Mrs. William 
and family moved Tuesday to 
farm of Robert Youell on the You- 
eU Road. 



EQUALIZATION 






and the Women's Athletic Associa 
tion. She was also listed in the A 
group of the honor roll for the fall 
quarter. < 



the First Marine .'^fe'iTCfu ,Vi, 

He was based on Midway, Boug- 
ainville, Green Island, and in the 
Russell and New Hebrides Islands 
and Hawaii. 

Shepherd was graduated in 1937 
from Crescent Springs, Ky. High 
School and was an employee of the 
Ohio Valley Roofing and Siding 
Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, before 
enlisting in March 1942. . 
mill . » "iiM « i ■ i ■ 

W. Lv Cropper aad Miss Mary 
Bess Crop**! wcic dinner go*"*" 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kirtley Cropper 
and family, last Thursday even- 
ing. 



B. I 



WILL BE IN SESSION FOR NEXT 
TEN DATS FOR PURPOSE OF 




The 



County Board of 



.;•*• 



,tmu is 

ll'fTOb 



By Fire 



A small frame residence owned 
by Otto Browning on the Una- 
burg Creek Read near Umaburg 
was completely destroyed by fire 
Monday afternoon. The blase had 
gained such headway before it was 
discoveredv not even the contents 
were saved from the blase. 



and will remain hi 
days, according to Wilton 



for 



of tat 

L. D. 
Conner, assisted 



are- 



the T%» 



appointed by 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Acra and 
daughter Frances, Miss Owen Tay- 

U\* unrt Uhmn Wtbtwcs Thmcan werejl 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 

Henry Siekman and daughter, Mil 

dred. , . 



board 

Judge a L. Cropper. 

Duties of the board 
view the 
1944. hew 

in 



of Ju* I. 



Mrs. Metvm 

been ill for the past tew 

to CHfn£ hc5j!!^!!* 
tor a 

* 



few days. Mr. 



f 



V. 



TBCBflDAT, R8RUABT t, IMS 



THB BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



&DME CDUNTY REEIIRDER 



A. R. STSf HEN8, 

RAYMOND COWS, 



-3t 



Fact office, Burltnctan, Ky., u Second Clan Matt Matter 



,Y THURSDAY 

— ■ 



SWT ISmmnQ USDXUM IN BOONS COUNTY 
ADVRKTltUNO INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per odwmn Inch. 

HOTICES AND CARDS Oft 7 THANKS: 35 words and under 50c. Over 25 
words $1.00. — » ; ; 

4LAB8D7BD ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
werthone cent each. AH classified ads. payable in advance. 
IIECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width IS 
cms; column depth, 21 Inches. Use mats or electros. 

_____ / 



Subscription Rate $i jjq per Year 



MEMBER 

AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over fifty Years 



■ 






wfittBER 

KENTUCKY PRES. 

AS SOCIATION , 
Hffinn 77TfnYiMi 



FLORENCE 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

-For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

BURLINGTON 95 

We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 



Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett at- 
tended the funeral of Thomas Mor- 
ris on Friday afternoon in Cov- 
ington. 

Mrs. Ralph Orschelle entertained 
with a six o'clock dinner on Tues- 
day evening in compliment of Miss 
Clara Watts, of Erlanger. 

The many friends of Mrs. Anna 
Souther regret to learn she is very 
ill at her residence. J 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ryle, of Bur- 
lington Pike "entertained with a six 
o'clock dinner on Thursday even- 
ing in honor of their grandson, 
Sonny Ryle. The following guests 
were -present: Mr. and Mrs. John 
T. Stephenson, Mr. and Mrs. Wal 
lace Ryle and daughter Claudia 
and Sonny Ryle. 

Sgt. Victor Johnson and wife, of 
Ft. Bragg, N. C, Mrs. Sarah Lush 
er and Mrs. Mary Blaak, of Er- 
langer called on Mr. and Mrs 
Elbert Cook and family, Saturday 
afternoon. 

Charles Tanner and family, of 
Bullittsville spent Sunday with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Tanner 
of U. S. 42. 

Miss Emma Scott, of Erlanger 
visited Mrs. Willford and called on 
Mrs. Emma Cleek, on Sunday. 

The many friends of Mrs. Edna 
Stephens regret to learn of her ill 
ness the past week. At this writing 
she is greatly Improved. 

Lon Renaker, of Cincinnati, vis- 
ited his sister, Mrs. Eva Miller and 
family. 

Mrs, Joe McClain, of Texas has 
arrived here for a visit with rela- 
tives. 



REMEMBERWHEN 



\ 



— the Chautauqua pitched tent each 
summer? It dispensed education and 
entertainment in easy doses for both 
young and old at convenient hours 
during the day and evening. That was 
before the movies captured America. 
Remember? 



CATHERMAN 
FUNERAL HOME 

Tel CO 2580 Ludlow, Ky. 



•I' 



•:_ 



<t^-^— 



'WATERLOO 

Mrs. Geo. Rector spent Wednes 
day with her mother, Mrs. Ernest 
Brown. 

Bert Newhall Is spending a few 
weeks in Florida. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Purdy and son 
Oene were fn Covington, Wednes- 
day. 

Miss Mary Helen Rector was the 
Sunday guest of her nncle, George 
Rector and family. 

Mr. an<J Mrs. Virgil Mallicoat 
and son and Miss Betty Portwood, 
were the week-end guesets of their 
parents. 

Congratulations, to Mildred 
Kettle and Harry Stephens, Anna 
Pearl Arr asm ith and Gene Burr is, 
who were married Saturday. 

Mrs. Jack Purdy called on Mrs. 
Bryant Jones, Friday morning. 

Nellie Jo Purdy visited Mary 
Presser, Thursday night. 

. i ^ 

NOTICE 




BELLEVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
Itor, W. Girth. Faster 

Sunday School 10:90 a. m. 
Morning worship 11:30 a. m. 
Evening worship at 7:00 p. m. 
Prayer meeting 7:00 p. m. . m 
' Everyone is cordially invited to 
nttend these services. 

FLORENCE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Rev. Root. Carter, Pastor 

Bible School 10:00 a. m. 
Morning services 11 
and third Sundays. 
Everyone welcome. 



Persons owning dogs that were 
in my sheep Sunday, January 28, 
are hereby notified to kill these 
dogs to avoid further complica 
tlons. Any dogs caught on my 
farm will be killed on sight. 32-2p 
UTZ AND BLACKBURN, 
Burlington, Kentucky. 



SAND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. L. M. Hamilton, Pastor 

Sunday School each' Sunday at 
10:00 a. m. (CWT). John Whitaker, 
Supt. . o 

Morning Worship at 11 a. m. 

Evening Worship at 7:30. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 7:30. 

We invite you to come .and wor- 
ship with us. 



CONSTANCE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Arthur Tipton, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. Shirley 
D. Hempfling, Supt. 

Preaching Services each first 
and third Sundays at 11 a. m. and 
7:45 p. m. 

Your church needs you and you 
need your church. 



POSTED 

All persons are nereoy notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: 

W. E. Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm .."of J. W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. 

John O. Richards, Jr., farm, 
Florence, Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried In this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 3f, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDTTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop] 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 
Permanents . v , . . $5.00 up 
Cold Wave 

Permanent ..... $10.00 up 
Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



^Ji ■•* ■ ii it in in i ii 1 1 1 1 J if I ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 - 

I WASHERS REPAIRED I 

r AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

- WM. HAGEDORN 

856 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. = 

!lHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUI1llllllll|||||||||||||^ 




S CHAMBERS & GRUBBS OFFER . . . 



A service which the older residents of Eoone County have 
known and respected for almost half a century — and which 
newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. 



Chamber* & Gruhbs § 

JNKRAL DIRECTORS WALTON 352 || 

MIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIHIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIli 





An Isadh* breed* U S. \**rMC42A- 

Approved. Blood-tested, started chicks one, two and 
threo weeks old. Prices right. Also gexsd chicks. 
FKEECATALOG.Write: KtNTUCKY HATCHERY 
t» WMT FOUHTH STRICT • LEXINOTON. KKNTUCKT 



V 

1 _ 

till 



BRING YOUR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON . 

For Full Price and Honest 
Weight 

. Phone: HFmlock 6135 

Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. « 



FLORENCE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Harold Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. Oilby 
Oreen Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

7:30 Evangelistic Service. 
Prayer meeting Saturday evening 
at 7:30. 

You are Invited to come — wor- 
ship an J work with us. 



RICHWOOB PRESBITERIAN 
CHURCH 

Milton A.-Wilmesherr, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sundays. * 

10:00 a. m. Sunday School. B. 
F. Bedinger, Supt. . * 

11:00 a. m. Morning Worship 
Service. 

7:30 p. m. Evening Worship Ser- 
vice. 



PETERSBURG CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Claude R. McDonald. Pastor 

Preaching 1st and 3rd Sundays. 
11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

Church school 10 a. m. R. R. 
Witham, Supt. 

We invite you to worship with 
us Sunday. 



BIG BONE BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Sam S. Hogan, Pastor 

Sunday School 10 a. m. (CWT), 
Harry Rouse, Supt. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. (CWT) 

B. T. U. 7:50 p. m. (CWT). 

Evening Evangelistic Service 8:30 
p. m. (CWT). 

Prayer services each Wednesday 
evening 8:30 (CWT). 

Services each Sunday. You are 
cordially invited' to worship with 
us. 

BURLINGTON METHODIST 

CHURCH 

Rev. Oliver B. Thomas, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:00 a. m. f 

Morning Worship 11:00 a. m. 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Thursday evening 
at 7:30 p. m. 

Services held each Sunday. The 
public Is cordially invited. 



FLORENCE M. E. CHURCH 
Rev. Elmer Kid well, Pastor 

S. S.v.at 10:00 a. m. Supt. Car- 
roll Washburn. 

Morning Worship 11 a. m. 

Evening Service at 8>po p. m. 

Young Peoples meeting 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30 
p. m. * 



BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

W. T. Gardner, Pastor 

Sunday School 10:30 a. m. (CWT) 
C. L. Lancaster, Supt. 
Preaching every Sunday at 11:30; 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 



EAST BEND BAPTIST CHURCH 
Carl J. Wainscott, Pastor 

Sunday School each Sunday at 
10:30 (CWT). Raymond Ashcraft, 
Supt. 

f reaching every _un_ay at 11:30 

livening Service at 7:io iC.W.T.) 

B. T. U. 7:00 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday night 
at 8:00. 



CONSTANCE CHURCH OF 
BRETHREN 
Orion Erbaogn, Pastor 
Sunday School 10 a. m. Law- 
rence Rodamer, Supt. 

Church Services each Sunday 
and Wednesday at 7:30. 
You need your church. 



PETERSB URG M ETHODIST 

CHURCH 
Rev. O. B. Thomas, Pastor 

Services each first and third 
Sunday afternoons. 

You are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



PETERSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. Edward Furginson, Pastor 
Sunday School at 10 a. m. CWT, 
Morning Worship at 11:00 a. m 
B. T. U. 6:45 p. m. 
Evening Worship at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer meeting each Wednesday 

night at 7:30 p. m. 



BURLINGTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
Rev. R. A. Johnson, Pastor 

Sunday School at 10 a. m. 

Morning Worship at 11:00. 

B. T. U. 6:45 (CWT) A for Juniors, 
Intermediates and Seniors 

Evening Worship 7:30 p. in. 

Prayer meeting each Wednesday 
7:30 p. m. 

You are cordially Invited to at- 
tend. 



INDEPENDENCE BAPTIST 

CHURCH 

W. E. Maners, Pastor 

10:00 A. M. Sunday School 
. 11:00 A, M. Worship. 

7:30 P. M. B. T. U. 

8:00 P. M Evangelistic Service. 

8:00 P. M. Wednesday, Prayer 
p.nd Bible Sturdy. 

Third Monday night, men's meet- 
ing. 



= 



= 



IMPROVED 
UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
chool Lesson 

BT HAROLD L. MJNDQUIST. D. D. 

CM The Moody Blbla Inatltute ot Chicago. 

Ralaaaad by Western Newspaper Union. 

Lesion for February 11 



Lesson subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected end copyrighted by International 
ellgious ~- 



. copyrighted 
Council of Religious EducaUon 
permission 



used bar 



JESUS AND THE TWELVE 



Turning under good growths of 
▼etch and using fertilizer, has 
doubled tobacco production hi a 
few years on the farm of R. E. 
Bragg in Adair county, according 
to County Agent R. B. Rankin. He 
grew 1,954 pounds of Ky. 16 on one 
and .a tenth acres and sold it for 
$943 above expenses. The land was 
seeded to vetch ua 600a as the to- 
bacco was cut. 

Leslie O. Keltner, another Adair 
county farmer, had such good suc- 
cess with Ky 41A tobacco last year 



11:1. 



LESSON TEXT— Mslthew 10:1. B-8 
35-30. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Ye sre my friends. If 
ye do whatsoever I command you.— John 
13:14. 



Service for Christ has not always 
been as impressive and effective as 
it should be because it has lacked 
conviction and spiritual power. God 
did not intend it to be the weak and 
faltering thing that it often is, be- 
cause of our failure to go God's way. 

The sending out of the twelve had 
special significance, and yet it 
brings forth principles which have 
a bearing on the service of every 
believer in Christ. 

The Servants of Christ— -^ 

I. Have a Divine Commission (10: 
1, 5,8). 

The twelve disciples had already 
been called into the Lord's service. 
Now thev were to he prepared for 
the service which was ahead. It 
was a time of commissioning and 
empowerment for service. 

God calls men today to serve Him. 
In fact, there is a very real sense 
in which every Christian is called to 
serve. Let no one try to excuse him- 
self from that responsibility and 
privilege. 

To some comes a special call to 
leave their accustomed daily work 
and launch out into a broader serv- 
ice for Christ. When that time 
comes, we may go forth with the 
assurance that the power of a divine 
Saviour goes with us. The twelve kv 
disciples had some special powers 
which we do not have and do not 
need. God suits the power to the 
need, and that means that in every 
circumstance we may look to Him 
with assurance, and go on. 

One of our difficulties in dealing 
with such matters as spiritual power 
is that we interpret the things of the 
realm of the spirit by physical stand- 
ards and measurements. We are so 
quick to say "I cannot" on the basis 
of our logical human reasoning, 
when an appreciation of the power 
of God which is operative on our 
behalf would make us say with con- 
fidence, "I can." But, sadly enough, 
having left God out of our reckon- 
ing, we find that it is indeed true 
that we cannot. 

Serving Christ means doing so in 
His power, and with His grace upon 
us. Nothing less will do! Nothing 
more is needed! 

II. Declare a Divine Revelation 
(11:1, 25-27). 

The messenger's responsibility 
and importance are largely deter- 
mined by the nature of the mes- 
sage he has to convey. Particularly 
is that true where the message must 
pass through his personality and thus 
be proclaimed. The nations of the 
earth choose their most able men 
to- be their ambassadors and grant 
them full power. 

The glorious thing about being a 
messenger for God is that we carry 
no ordinary communication. What 
we have to present is far above the 
most important message any earth- 
ly ambassador could possibly have 
to carry. 

We, the children and servants of 
God through Jesus Christ, have 
something direct from the throne of 
God. He has revealed it (v. 23), 
and it seemed good in His sight. to 
give it to those who had the childlike 
faith to believe Him. 

God's revelation is hidden from 
those who are wise in their own con- 
ceits, who are too proud to come by 
way of humility and faith. Thank 
God, some of the wise and mighty 
of this world have been willing to 
become as little children and learn 
at the feet of Jesus. 

The encouraging thing about it is 
that the door is open to . the sim- 
plest believer to trust God, to take 
the revelation of God's truth in His 
word, and give it out with grace and 
power. 

III. Extend a Divine Invitation 
(11:28-30). 

"Come"— what a blessed word for 
the needy and sinful t They are not 
to be shut out by their sin, nor to b& 
hindered by their weakness. The 
door is open, and the invitation is 
to come. Why not respond? 

To whom are they to come? To 
Jesus. There are times when men 
can help us, when friends or church 
officers or the pastor can give us an 
uplifting word of counsel and en- 
couragement. But for salvation, for 
a real lifting of the burden from the 
shoulders of those "that labor and 
are heavy laden," there is no one 
like Jesus. 

We are privileged to invite people 
to Jesus, knowing that if they 
"learn" of Him (v. 29), they will 
not only have their loads lifted and 
find rest, but will enter into a bless- 
ed yoke, fellowship with Him in life 
and service. 

His is a wholesome or a kindly 
yoke. That is the meaning of 
"easy" in verse 30. It is not always 
easy to serve Christ, but being yoked 
with Him in a kindly fellowship 
of service makes the burden light. 

The world is full of tired and dis- 
couraged people. We who know 
Christ have the adequate answer to 
their need. Shall we not go in His 
name to present the truth to them 
and invite thorn tn rnrne. to Christ? 



BIJLLITTSVIILE CHRISTIAN 
CJtfURrE 

Noble Lucas, Minister. 
Fn aching 2nd and 4th Sunda; 

u ii. and 8:00 p. m. 
Church Rr-rrxil » verv Sunday at 
in a m Ben Kottmyer, 8upt 



ADAIR MAN DOUBLES 

TOBACCO PRODUCTION 



that he is planning to grow no 
other kind this season. 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE 

All persons having claims again- 
st the estate of Taney Clore, de- 
ceased are requested ' to present 
same properly proven according to 
law, and all persons indebted to 
the said estate are requested to 
call and .settle with the undersign- 
ed. 



Char lea, Clore, 
Administrator 



32-2t-p 



MAKE HOME REPAIRS MOW! 



Quality * 

Roofings 



>^»<7* 



£xpeit 

Service 
. . . available without delay 

If you need roof repair*, or an entirely now roof, 
there is no government regulation that willf delay 
the work. Wo have available ample stock of CAREY 
Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of prompt service 
and the biggest roof value to bo had anywhere. 
Call us, or come in about your roofing needs. Wo 

handle all details. No rod tape. 

# 

•Buy WAR BONDS 
•aW STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

219 CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 




*_■:« 




STANDARD FOR OVER 60 YEARS 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



CONTINUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER, 




"MEMBER 
JEDERAL HOME L0, 
~BANK SYSTEM 



§} 



KENTUCKY 



New temporary location, next door, in former 
Bentler Drug Store building. 



3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none, We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best ail around market 
in the country. We 
hope yon will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES Sow? 5 '&SJF j£ 

the first man yea meet. 



^mim* 



|ifiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii 
I FULL CREDIT I 

= ■ 

given on 

jj ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 1 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



■ Phone ERL. 87 



Til 



Ambulance Service 




A PLEDGE OP PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP&STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONP 

SERVICE ' FLORENCE 13 



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THE BOONS OOUNTT 



BUKUNOTOM, KSNTOCET 



FLORENCE 



The many friends of Wm. Busby 
regret to learn be la a patient In a 
Dayton, Ohio hospital. 

Mrs. Lawrence Thompson had 
for her guest on Saturday after- 
noon, Mrs. Emma Cleek, Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry Tanner, Rev. Kldwell, 
Mrs. R. W. Miller and Mrs. Freddie 
Kleemire. 

Mrs. Ethel Mae McClain nurse in 
a Texas Hospital, arrived here last 
week-end for a visit with her 



grandparents, M. P. Barlow and 
wife. 

Miss Clara Watts teacher at the 
Florence ichool was dinner guest 
Wednesday evening of Mrs. Sarah 

Markesbery- 

T VH*< Glenn Marie Tanner enter- 
tained a group of her friends on 
Wednesday evening with a party. 

Mrs. Lloyd Rouse spent Wednes- 
day with her sister, Mrs. Virgil 
Day of Erlanger. 

Miss Wanda Luck, of Lloyd Ave., 
Is recovering from measles. 

The Florence P.-T. A. is giving 



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ac 



Used Cars 

MANY ARE GUARANTEED! 

'36 INTERNATIONAL PICK-UP, guar. 345.00 

*36 CHEV. Vi TON PANEL TRUCK 255t)0 

1936 TERRAPLANE 4-DOOR 200.00 

'34 CHVEROLET COACH 175.00 

'40 DODGE TUDOR 963.00 

'37 BUICK SEDAN 56000 

'36 CHEVROLET PANEL TRUCK 255.00 

'36 DODGE COUPE • 350.00 

'34 NASH SEDAN 150.00 

'37 TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



a play on Firday night, Feb. 9th at 
•the Florence school auditorium. Ad- 
mission 20 and 35 cents. Come out 
and enjoy an evening of laughs. 

Harold McKlbben has been con- 
fined to bis home the past week 
due to Illness. 

A large, crowd attended the fare- 
well party given on Friday night 
in honor of Tech. John Robert 
Darby, who win leave Friday, after 
a 30-day furlough at home. 

Prof. A, M. Yealey is on the sick 

list. 

Mrs. Hayden, of ErlanKer visited 
Mrs. Zeffa Osborn and Mrs. Jennie 
Dobbins, last Tuesday. — r— — 

Mrs. Frank Sayre and Mrs. Ralph 
Llpp were Wednesday afternoon 
guests of Mrs. Jennie Dobbins and 
Mrs. Zeffa Osborn. 

Miss Patsy Byrne spent the past 
week-end with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Zeffa Osborn. 

Mrs. Ida Hunter, of Ft. Mitchell 
and Miss Benta SnOw, of Highway 
42 were guests of Mrs. Jennie Dob- 
bins and Mrs. Zeffa Osborn on 
Thursday evening of last week. 

MrsVEldridge Carpenter called 
on Mrs. Jennie Dobbins on Thurs- 
day — —5 — 

Mrs. Charlotte Wilson spent 
Monday night with Mrs. Zeffa Os- 
born. 

Week-end guests of the J, T. 
Stephens were the Clayton Browns 
of Covington and Leslie Stephen- 
son, of Owenton. 

Mrs. C V. Arnold departed on 
Saturday to Join her husband, who 
Is stationed at Madison, Wis. 

Mrs. Ray Davidson of New York, 

has arrived for a visit with her 

brothers Pvt. Edgar Allen McCardle 

and Robert McCardle and family. 

Many friends of Gordon Laile re- 



gret to learn he is suffering with a 
broken knee, the result of an acci- 
dent at the place of his employ- 
ment. 

Miss Louise Bentoh and J*mmie 
Bonar spent Monday in Cin c inn ati 

Miss Hannah Oelsner of Coving- 
ton was a welcome visitor here on 
Saturday afternoon and attended 
the funeral of her cousin, Mrs. 
Emma Freeman. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Osborn and 
family spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Finnell Osborn, of Covington. 

Mrs. Cecil Osborn, Mr. and Mrs. 
Finnell Osborn spent Saturday aft- 
ernoon with Mr. and Mrs; David 
Osborn and family. 

Mrs. Charley Cahlll and Mrs. Ott 
Boer, of Norwood, O., called on Mrs 
Minnie Clore, Saturday afternoon 

Bert Scott and family spent Sat- 
urday afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. 
Lon ciore. 

Services for Mrs. Emma Free- 



formerly of 
held at 2 o'clock on Saturday aft- 
ernoon at the Tharp * Stlth fu- 
neral home in Florence. Burial 
was in Florence. She died Thurs- 
day at Booth Hospital, Covington 
as the result of burns received at 
her home. 



PITTS 



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NEW and CLEAN 

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Used Furniture 



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Wm. Morris has been confined 
to his home the past week due to 
illness. 

Mrs. L. C. Arnold and little son 
of Florence moved to the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Arnold for the 
duration. 

Mrs. Raymond Gross spent Tues- 
day In Cincinnati, shopping. 

We regret to learn that Dad Clut- 
terbuck remains on the sick list at 
the home of his sister, Mrs. Sallie 
Hlghtower of Ludlow. 

Thanks to those sending items 
in for this column. We appreciate 
your cooperation. 

Charles Craven, of Newport call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Snyder 
last Saturday and left Monday for 
Florida to visit friends for a few 
weeks.! 

We are sorry to hear that Mrs. 
D. I. Tanner is confined to her 



home with an attack of toMOttt*. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert McCardle 

entertained on Monday evening, a 
group of little friends In honor of 
their little son Donald's birthday, 
with a party in the evening. A 
beautiful birthday cake was placed 
in the center of the table and six 
small candles were lighted. Games 
were enjoyed by the children, and 
and left wishing Donald many 
more happy birthdays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Scott and son 
of Waterloo, spent Saturday with 
Mr. and Mrs. Lob Clore. 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Stephen- 
son entertained with a six o'clock 
dinner on Saturday evening in 
comphment of their daughter, Mrs. 
Clayton Brown's birthday anniv- 
ersary. 

Wm. Freemon and son, of Lou- 




death of his 







Sgt. Victor Johnson, 
been stationed at Ft Dr a w, 1 
has been dis charg ed from 
duties and arrived here 8a 
to visit Mrs. Johnson's mo ther . 
Sarah Lasher and grandm 
Mrs. Mary Black. They left 
day for their home in Ona4 
Ida, Mich., where they wB - 

Mr. and Mrs. Bbert Coo* and 
family spent Saturday evening m 
Coviagton, guests ©* sir. m>* tt* 
Howard Cook and family. 

The large circle of friends oi Ben 
Anten will be delighted to know 
that he is convalescing nicely at 
his home, after being a patient tor 
several weeks at Booth HospttaL 



NOTICE! 



For use , over wallpaper, 
calcimine or most any inside 
surface. An oil base. 



2 W& 




KxHXHXHZHXHXHXHIHZHXHXHSi 



Clear vision, no bead' 
aches or nervous strains 
, . . the boy tbat sees 
well LEARNS WELL. 



Any person failing to receive one of our calend- 
ars, please write or caU and we wiH man yon one 
promptly. 

Chambers & Grubbs]| 



WALTON, 



KENTUCKY 



DR.J.O.TYSON 

• ' OFTICC AT 

lyiOTCH 

TH€ ; J€ We L€RS 
61315 MADISON OV, COVINGTON 
. S'INC€ IBS7 



LMIllllllllllllllllllllll"IHIIIllllllHIIMIIHIimmilllllllllHlllllllllHIIMtlllllimiIIIimi| 

1 PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. f 

| COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured Under the Federal 
| Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 

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For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 
ERLANGER KENTUCKY 



Madison furniture 
Store 



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1 More 1 

432-434 Madison Ave. 
3 Covington, -:- Kentucky X 

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I WILL OFFER FOR SALE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, AT 
THE FARM OF LOUIS RYLE ON LICK CREEK, TWO MILES 
EAST OF RABBIT HASH ON UNION ROAD, 



Having sold my farm, I will sell at Auction 

to the highest bidder at my farm located 

1 mile northwest of Burlington, on the 

Burlington-Idlewild road on 



SAT., FEB. 

AT 12 O'CLOCK (CWT) 

The following property: Two good work horses; 2 fresh cows; 
1 thoroughbred red male hog, wt. 225 lbs.; 1 thoroughbred red 
sow, wt. 200 lbsy&sets of work harness; collars, bridles and 
check lines; 1 rolnwafym; one 2-horse sled, good as new; mow- 
ing machine; hay rake; disc harrow; 1 Oliver breaking plow ; 1 
hillside plow; 1 single shovel plow; 1 double shovel plow; one 
5-shovel plow; 1 iron International smoothing harrow, good as 
new; one-horse corn drill; pitchforks; post digger; wire stretch- 
er; 1 sledge hammer; 40 bushels of corn; some good alfalfa hay; 
1 scalding box, good as new; 1 lard kettle and other articles too 
numerous to mention. 



Friday, Feb. 16 

Beginning at IS O'clock Sharp C.W.T. 



TERMS: CASH 





I | 
REUBEN KIRtLEY, Auctioneer 



CLORE 



LIVESTOCK— Three milch cows, one will be 
fresh by day of sale; 3 heifers will be fresh soon; 
2 brood sows, will farrow soon; 2 Duroc male 
hogs; 18 head sheep; some chickens; 1 gray horse 
nine years old; 1 sorrel horse five years old. 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS— 1 set double hither 
harness, collars, bridles and halters; 1 road wag- 
on, box bed, hay bed; mowing machine; hay 
rake; two-horse corn planter with fertilizer at- 
tachment; one 2-horse grain drill; 1 Oliver rid- 
ing turning plow; 1 disc harrow; one 60-tooth 



harrow; 3 double shovel plows; singletrees, 
doubletrees and many other articles. A lot of this 
equipment is practically new. -.» — 
MISCELLANEOUS— Fifty bates of nice straw; 
some hay, loose or in bale. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Good heatrola 
3-piece bedroom suite; 2 bedsteads and 2 dress- 
ers; 1 library table; 1 davenett; some chairs; 1 
kitchen set, table and four chairs; 1 oil stove, 4- 
burner; 1 bath tub and wash bowl; 2 feather 
beds; 1 DeLaval cream separator; 3 rugs. 



TERMS : CASH- 



*% 



Kirtley and Bradford, Auctioneers 



* »« 



THE BOONS COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KBHTU 



i 



WHY WAIT? PLENTY OF UNLOADING ROOM 

And the QUICKEST SALE of Any Floor on the State's Leading Market 

BRING YOUR TOBACCO TO 









PHONE 711 












MR. T. A. (UNCLE TOM) MARSHALL, FLORENCE, KY., SALES MANAGER 
HERBERT MOORE McSHANE SHROPSHIRE J. W. SWITZER G. E. MOORE 



WM. L PENN 



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HEBRON 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilsbrt and 
family were dinner guests of Rev. 
and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton, Friday 
evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Peel and fam- 
ily returned home Saturday, after 
spending a week with her mother, 
Mrs. George Casper, of Ludlow, 



while Mr. Casper was a patient in 
the Good* Samaritan Hospital. 

Several from here attended the 
meeting of the Bullititsville Mis- 
sionary Society at the home of 
Mrs. Noble Lucas, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Clore and 
son were Sunday afternoon guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Herrington. 

Mrs. Stanley Graves called on 



II 



Lowest Cash Prices In Town 

ON MATTRESSES, FLOOR COVERINGS 

Mattresses, Floor Coverings, Stoves, Rugs, Furniture, Odd Pieces 
50 Lb. All Felt Mattress $10.98 

Felt Day Bed 
Mattress 

$8.9.8 

Baby Crib 

Mattress 

$3.98 

Rubberized 

Crib 

Mattress 

$6.98 
Linoleum 

Mats/ 
35c Each 



Felt Daven- 
port Mattress 
$5.98 
50 Lb. 
Cotton 
Mattress 
$8.98 
27x36 
Jute Rugs 

69c 

Enamelware 

Dish Pans 



9x12 Linoleum 
RUGS $3.98 

SPECIAL 

55 Lb. Pure White 

Felt Layer Mattress 

$14.98 

lllllllllllllllllllllll 



85c \^ 

We have any size linoleum rugs— Gold Seal & Armstrong Quaker 

J. A. BAUMGARTNER ' 

21 Pike St. and 24 W. 7th Covington, Ky. 

Next Door to Geo. W. Hill, Grocer 



IGEO.W.HILL&COJ 

ANOTHER BIG 

YEAR 



M 



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V< 



[BIGGEST DEMAND FOR 
FOOD IN OUR HISTORY 



CHALLENGES 
FARMER . . . 



EVERY 



&=£ 



PLAN NOW 

Send for our 
complete list. 
Post card will 
do, with your 
name and ad- 
dress. 
Price List By 
Return Mail 



DIXIE BRAND 



best for Held and garden 



Fresh, New Send, tried and proven, high in 
germination tad purity, best results as- 
sured. Modern laboratories of experienced 
seed analysts put Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds 
through the acid test and. pat their stamp 
pf approval on them. Make this year your 
most profitable! • - 



DR. SALESBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES AND 
DR. HESS PTZ POWDER AND PELLETS 



CCORCC W. 



Sine* 1963 

ILL 

AMD 

COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 
u-u w. 

SEVENTH ST. 

COVINGTON, 



25-29 PIKE 
STREET 

KENTUCKY 



Harry Hicks of Covington, Friday 
afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carpenter, 
of Florence, called on Mr. and 
Mrs. J. C. Hollis, Sunday evening. 

Mrs. Emmett Kilgonr spent last 
Tuesday with Mrs. George Moore. 

Miss Grace Weghorn called on 
Mrs. Harold Utz, Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Shinkle are 
the proud parents of a baby gin, 
born Jan. 30 at the St. Elizabeth 
Hospital. It has ' been named 
Bernetta Joy. 

Miss Sadie Rieman spent Thurs- 
day night with Mrs. Nellie Mark- 
land. 

The Hebron basketball teams 
journeyed to New Haven, Friday 
night and were victorious in all 
three games. . 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Gliver Kott- j 
yer, Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Mary Utz and daughter i 
spent Thursday night with Mr. ! 



liiiiiiiiimiiimmimiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiii 

New James 

Theatre 

NEW SHOW TIME 
One Show Each Night at 7:30 CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 2:30 (CWT) 
Bargain Nights Monday & Thurs. 



Russell Hayden, Bob Wills and His 
Texas Playboys, in 

WYOMING HURRICANE 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH 



Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews and 
Clifton Webb, in 

LAURA 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 9 AND 10 



and Mrs. Barney T urn e r, . of Hill 
Top. 

The Hebron Homemakers* Club 
will meet at the home of Mrs. Har- 
old Schneider, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 14tti. 

Walton Rice, called on his sister, 
Mrs. Luther iHood Sunday after- 
noon at the St. Elizabeth Hospital. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. A. 
B. Ligon, of Bullittsville. 

June Conner, was ill the past 
week. 

Harry Lee Aylor S 3/c returned 
home Thursday from Great Lakes 
for a few days' furlough. 

Mrs. Addle Aylor returned home 
Friday from several weeks' visit 
with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Jones and 
family, of Burlington. 

The many friends here of Mrs. S. 
B. Faulkner, of Ludlow regret to 
learn she Is in St. Elizabeth hos- 
pital, due to a fall. They recent- 
ly moved from their farm here, to 
Ludlow. 

H. L. Crigler, E. S. Graves, Paul 
Poston and Elmo Jergens attended 
graduation exercises at Springfield, 
Ohio, where Rev. Paul Rimmer was 
one of the graduates. 

Mr j. and Mrs. H, L. Crigler, Mrs. 
Omer Dolwick and son Carlton 
and Wm. Crigler spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Woodford Crig- 
ler and son David. 



CONSTANCE 



DEVON 



t 



Don Ameche, Carmen Miranda, in 

GREENWICH VILLAGE 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 III 



Robert Lowery, Ellen Drew ,in 

DARK MOUNTAIN 

"Jungle Queen" Serial Starting 
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12TH 



i NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13TH 



Buster Crabbe, Arljne Judge, in 

THE CONTENDER 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 
lllllillllllll II Hill iili I i iii iiiif iiliiiilliil 



Mr. and Mrs. West Scott and 
family moved to the Dr. Northcutt 
farm on the Burlington Pike, Mon- 
day. We are sorry to lose them 
from our midst. 

Word has been received by his 
wife that Pvt. Edward Biddle 
is in the army hospital at . Camp 

landing, Fla. We wish for him a 
peedy recovery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wood called 
on Mr. and Mrs. West Scott and 
family, Saturday. 

Henry Holzworth and Elmer Car 
penter hauled their tobacco to Car 
rollton, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Stanley left 
Sunday to spend a few weeks in 
Florida. 

Mrs. Henry Holzworth and Junior 
Carpenter are among those on the 
sick list from this community. 



HILL TOP 



Mrs. Mary Hayes and son Rob- 
ert, spent last Thursday afternoon 
with Omer Easton and family near 
Independence . • ; 

Mrs. Robert Jenkins, of Ft. Mit- 
chell was the guest of her cousins, 
the W. D. Carder's, Friday. 

Mr, and Mrs, Ermin Kenton, of 
Covington, spent the day Friday 
with-her mother, Mrs. Mary Hays. 

Mrs. Charles Moore, Sr., and Mrs. 
John Moore called on Mrs. Minnie 
Dolehi, Friday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Truma 
were the guests Friday hii 
her sister, Mr. and Mrs. Otto 
and daughter of Westwood, 



ALWAYS 
COPPIN'S 

For 

SOMETHING 

NEW \ 



««£ 



COPPIN'S 

MADISON AT 7TH 
COVINGTON; \ -:- KENTUCKY 



Brenda Burton, of Florence is 
spending a few days with her cous- 
in Carol Clayton. 

Mrs. Harold Prabel and Diana 
called on Mrs. Chas. Hodges and 
Sandra on Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Louise Brockheft is home 

with her mother, Mrs. Minnie 

Klasserner, after spending the past 

year with her husband stationed 

"at Reno, Nevada. • \ ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Sel Vahlsing, of 
Bromley spent Thursday evening 
with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Lewis and 
sons. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Clayton en- 
tertained Friday evening in honor 
of his grandmother's birthday, Mrs. 
Nellie Shoemaker of Murray, Ky., 
Mrs. Bill Eichoff and son, of Lud- 
low, Mrs. Ed Hetzel, Betty and 
Billy Clayton of Florence, Brenda 
Burton and Carol Clayton. 

Misses Gertrude and Bertha 
Lane spent Sunday in Cincinnati. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Prabel, of 
Bromley spent ' Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Geo. Loze. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Kottmyer, of 
Hebron, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Kott- 
myer and family, Mrs. Chas. Hodges 
and Sandra, Brenda Burton, Mr. 
and Mrs. James Clayton and Carol 
surprised their mother, Mrs. Ollie 
Kottmyer with a birthday supper, 
Saturday. 

This community expresses deep- 
est sympathy to the Kendall fam- 
ily. Pvt. George Kendall was kill- 
ed in action on the battlefield in 
France. 

Mrs. Luther Hood is at Booth 
Hospital, having had an appendix 
operation. 



Baby Chicks 

Hatched from flocks that have been culled and 
blood tested and all reactors removed. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
WHITE WYANDOTTES 
ENGLISH WHITE LEGHORNS 



per 
100 



1 week old chicks $13.00 per $100 

2 weeks old chicks $16.00 per 100 

CUSTOM HATCHING: Hen eggs 2</ 2 cents per 
egg; Turkey and duck eggs 4 cents per egg. 

DEARBORN and UBIKO POULTRY FEED 

Brooder Stoves, Chick Feeders and Fountains 
and other poultry equipment. 



DR. SALSBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES 

CONNER'S HATCHERY 

Telephone Hebron 113 HEBRON, KY. 



PUBLIC 





HAVING DECIDED TO QUIT FARMING I WILL SELL AT , 
PUBLIC AUCTION AT THE NAN BAKER FARM, ON LIMA- 
BURG AND CONSTANCE ROAD, ON 

Wednesday, Feb. 14 



12:00 NOON (CWT) 



THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: 



' : \ 

FARM TOOLS— 1 McCormick Peering mowing machine; one 
2-horse sled; one 1 -horse sled; 1 disc harrow; one 60-tooth har- 
row; 1 Oliver turning plow ; 1 potato plow; 2 double shovel plows 
one 5-shovel plow; one 1 -horse corn drill with fertilizer attach- 
ment. * * 



MISCELLANEOUS— Team of horses 6 and 8 years old, full 
brother and sister; feed boxes, barrels; singletrees, doubletrees, 
log chains; several pieces of household furniture; dishes; glass- 
ware; 100 shocks corn; good barn platform scales; and other 
articles too numerous to mention. 



TERMS : CASH 







LUTE BRADFORD, Auctioneer 



H 



■■ 



Mi 



TBI BOONS COUNTY MCOBDIB, BOBUNOTON, 



mmmmmmmm' 



rmmmm[mmmm\\mwmmm^mm\\\\\\m\\\\\\\m 
s Seen And Heard Around j 

I The County Seat | 

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rat 

Attention, ladies of Burlington 
Baptist Church! The W. M. 8, 
meets at the church, February 14 
«t 2:30 p. m. for its regular month- 
ly session. . -■ 

The Men's Bible Class of the local 
Baptist Church will hold their 
monthly social and business meet- 
ing at the church next Saturday 
night at 7:30 p. m. At that time 
Bev. W. H. Lodwlck, pastor of the 
Elsmere Baptist Church will be the 
guest speaker. All members' of the 



class are urged to be present; 

The Hebron P.-T. A. will meet on 
Tuesday, February 13th at the He- 
bron school house at a p. m. At 
this time a special Founder's bay 
program will be presented. 

Helen Fay Norris was confined to 
her home last week, suffering with 
a severe cold. 

D. H. Norris and family were 
pleasantly entertained at the home 
of his brother-in-law, Everett 
Kldwell, of Erlanger on Sunday. 




JUST THINKING 



When you are ill you think of your doctor, 

When you need groceries you think of your grocer, 



When you need legal advice you think of your lawyer, 
When you want to know the news you think of your newspaper, 
When you have money or need money we like to have you think 
of this bank. 
WE ARE AS MUCH INTERESTED IN YOUR SUCCESS 
AS^WE ARE IN THE SUCCESS OF>OUR OWN BUSINESS. 
MAY WE HELP YOU? . > 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 
MemBer Federal Deposit Insurance. Corporation 
Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $150,000.00 - 

S«H»M»M«MXM«MXWXtlKH«H»M»MKMIKXWXH«H«MXMXMKH»HXHKM»MMit 



Uta. Mary Clore, left Monday for 
Hollywood, Fla., for a few Weeks' 
visit with relatives. 

The Burlington P.-T."a(i. wffl naitet 
at the schoolhouse Monday night, 
February 12 at 7:30 p. in. 

Bert Gaines remains very ill this 
week. " 

Miss Marjorie Craig was ill at her 
home in Ghent last week, and un- 
able to teach. Mrs. Courtney Kelly 
substituted for her. 

Mrs. Nannie Riddell is ' slightly 
Improved at this writing. 

Beth Vice, daughter of Mr. and 
ifr's. VirgU Vice, who was quite ill 
last week, is rapidly improving. 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Kirtley and 
daughter, of East Bend called on 
her grandmother, Mrs. Flummer 
Gulley, Monday. 

Pvt. Noel Walton returned last 
Thursday to Ft. Lewis, Washington, 
after spending a furlough with his 
wife and children, here. 

Mrs. William Huey left last 
Thursday to spend a few days with 
her husband, who is stationed at 
Providence, Rhode Island. 

Cpl. George Terrill,- who has been 
overseas for the past thirty months 
is spending a furlough at his home 
in North Bend bottoms and was 
calling on friends here, Thursday. 

POINT PLEASANT 



GAYETY 
THEATRE 1 

ERLANGER, EliTMEBE, KT.. 

__i — 



FREE PARKING LOT 



TONIGHT — FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 8 AND 9TH 





GASBURG 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Aylor were 
the Sunday gap of Mr. and Mrs. 

Mines Jean and Irene White 
spent Sunday with Miss Thelma 
Grace Rogers. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
Miss Gladys called On Mr. and Mrs. 
E. E. Klopp and son Thursday aft- 
ernoon. < 

Mrs. Hebert Deck, of Petersburg 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
John Burns and family- 
Mr. and Mrs. Ovtt Webster and 
Miss Ida May Fleek called on Mr. 
and Mrs. John Klopp and Miss 
Gladys, one evening last week. 

Miss Emily Dell Siekman and Don 
Ray Klopp have been on the sick 
list the past week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bmbry Klopp and 
son called on Mrs. Earl Leek* and 
son, of Petersburg one evening last 
week. 

Mrs. Everett Earl Rogers is the 
guests of her mother, Mrs. Menkie 
of Madisonville, Ohio, this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers and 
daughter called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Fred Birkle and Mrs. Martha Felt- 
man and daughter ' one evening 
last week 



Women in Service Work 
Applaud these Style*! 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like for your 
hours on duty . . . feminine and flattering for your gala even- 
ings! Get your go-everywhere hairstyle today 1 

A LaRose Permanent will make it last and last 

RESTYLING-CUT, SHAMPOO-SET $2.00 

LaRose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Collins, Prop. 



Miss Patsy Dolwick, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dolwick cele- 
brated her 6th birthday with a 
party at her home, Saturday aft- 
ernoon for the following guests: 
Miss Judy Ann Wernz, Miss Dottie 
and Master Ronnie and J. B. Dol- 
wick, Miss Carolyn Jean Dolwick, 
Miss Mabel Dolwick, Mrs. Dilla and 
Nora Wernz, Mrs. Reeves and Mrs. 
Flora and Helen Dolwick. 

Miss Janet Faye Dolwick is still 
confined to her home after being 
ill with 3-day measles. 

Mrs. Harry Wernz called on Mrs. 
Adam Wernz, Sunday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Beil and son, 
of Ludlow, visited Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Wernz, Saturday evening. 

Mrs. Adam Wernz spent Saturday 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mrs. Henry Gooch, of Ludlow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Wernz enter- 
tained with a dinner Tuesday 
evening in compliment to her sis- 
ter and brother-in-law, Pfc. John 
Pierce of Ludlow, Pfc. Pierce arriv- 
ed home last Sunday week to spend 
a 15-day furlough from his duties 
at Camp Tulelahe, Calif. 

Mrs. Harold Burton is visiting 
her husband at Newport, R. I. 



DUTCH STANDARD 

4-Hr. Enamel, 18 colors. White for 
furniture, woodwork QC 1 

floors & waUs. $1.25 val.^J^qt. 



eeuiAH HLiJm '•* HWitiixtf ano«a 
601*01". TRAVERS- PRINCE -KING 

Added Short Subjects 
Feature at 7:15 and 9:09 



SATURDAY 

FEBRUARY 10T1I 
Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 




* 



Asr t, tm 



Buddie Ogden spent 
Buster Shinkle. 



with! Mrs. Edith fdbree ealtad on Mrs. 
Half, Saturday afternoon. 



= 



MIAL 
COMPANY 



COAL, am 
47 Dixie Highway -:- Erlaager, Ky. 

Call DIXIE 7720 for 

MORTON SUGAR CURE - TENDER QUICK, 

MEAT PUMPS - SAUSAGE SEASONING 



> 



LINOLEUM 

CHOICE OF 50 PATTERNS 
KITCHEN and LIVING ROOM RUGS 



Deepest sympathy is extended to 
the family of Mrs. Theresa Mc- 
Wethy who passed away last Mon- 
day. 

Mrs. George Couch, children and 
brother are visiting relatives in 
Leslie County. 

Albert Powell moved to Sand 
Gap, Saturday. 

Deepest sympathy is extended to 
the Albertson family, of Peters- 
burg. 

Sherman Burcham called on his 
son, Allen Burcham and Mrs. 
Burcham and sons. 



Covington Awning 
& Roofing Co. 



3RD AND SCOTT 



COVINGTON, KY. 



\ 



Quick-Dry Enamel ...$1.98 gallon 



Aluminum Paint 

Heat resisting. $4.95 val 



3.95 
gal 

GORDON SUPPLY GO. 

73G MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



Also Garden of Eatin, 2 Reel Com- 
edy and Chapter 11 "Flying Cadets" 

FEATURE STARTS: 

2:42, 4:32, 6:22, 8:12, 10:08 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Shinkle and 
family spent Sunday with Ross 
Shinkle and family.. 

Mrs. Dorotha Williams and baby 
spent the week-end with 'her 
grandmother, Mrs. Anna Smith, of 
Union. 

Mrs. Grace Feldhaus is enter- 
taining her son Bluford, who is 
home on a furlough. 



3111111111111111111111111111111 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMimillllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMg 

SAVE ON THESE VALUES | 

Just Received — New Shipment E 

1 CHINAWARE - GLASSWARE - POTTERY 



7-Pc. Water Set 

Beautiful design, 8-oz. 
Pitcher and Six 10-Oz. 
Footed Tumblers AQ* 
$1.50 value. Set ^QV 



32-Pc. Breakfast Set 

Service for six. Solid col- 
ors—either yellow or green. 
$8.50 value. $^.95 

Set O 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

FEBRUARY 11TI1 AND 12TH 




Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KT. 

Phone Florence 125 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 



cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining luster. We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 



6 TO 8-CUP COFFEE MAKER 

Drip style. Dunbar heat-resisting glass. Guaranteed against 
breakage from heat. $1.75 value. Only 50 to 14 •» 

sell at . . . each * 



VisitaOnr Pyrex Counter 



I 



PAT'S CHINA STORE 



Also Location GORDON SUPPLY CO. 
| 736 Madison Ave., Covington ._ . . HE. 4988 



MlflllllllllUlllllllllllllIllllllltllllHIIIIIIIUIUIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllltllllllftUMimMW 



The Home Store 

Mlllllillllll«IIIHI«»«l"ftl"«"«" ,,,,U,, * ,,,,,,,,,,H1M ? ,,,,,,M,,,1M,,,,,,,,,,,eM,,,H 

ORDER YOUR REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL 

FERTILIZER NOW! 

WE WILL HAVE OUR NEW CROP GRASS SEED ABOUT FEB- 

1—BOOK YOUR ORDER NOW! 



47 -INCH, 12-INCH STAY HEAVY FENCE rd. 55c 

47-DJ 6-IN. STAY HEAVY FENCE 2* «fi 

32-INCH 8-IN. HEAVY FENCE ). .. 'J*>JS& 

BARB WIRE HEAVY 80*ROD SPOOL , '. ; * PV **.»» 



-**^ 



K'fc 



TOBACCO SEEDS! 
STAFFORD'S SPECIAL ORIGINAL LONG LEAF 

GOLDEN BURLEY 1 <»• * L50 

« BELL'S BOURBON WHITE BURLEY, a smoker from 

bottom to top; root-rot resistant tobacco seed — 1 os. $1.50 

NO. 16. WHITE BURLEY CERTIFIED SEED 1 OB. $1.50 

WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY 1 ox. $1.50 

NO 33 WHITE BURLEY WILT RESISTANT SEED OK $150 



WHITE VILLA FLOUR UaJJ JJ». g-JJ 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR "'^ 

WHITE VILLA FLOUR • • •••» }»• ** c 

GOLD MEDAL FLOUR * »• ™ c 

SWEET HICKOR Y COF FEE .» ;v.*.l «>• ** c 

WHITE VILLA COFFEE .1 »• ?0c 

HONEY GROVE COFFEE .....1 lb. 2«c 

OLD BOONE COFFEE, balk 



1 lb. 29c 



:;)<>■ 



100 LB. SHELLED CORN ...$2.80 

100 LB. CRACKED CORN :..$2.90 

100 LB. SCRATCH FEED $3.25 

100 LB. 32% DAIRY ... 53.30 

100 LB. 24% DAIRY $3.20 

100 LB. DEARBORN HOG and PIG RATION ....$3.50 

100 LB. 16% DAIRY \ ..$$.00 

100 LB. WHEAT MIDDLINGS $2.65 

100 LB. MIX FEED ; . . . $2.65 

100 LB. SOYBEAN MEAL ...... .° $3.10 

100 LB. DEARBORN LAYING MASH $3.65 



SmUEY & PETTIT 

. - 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



MARCH 15th— 

The Las,t Day For Filing Your 

1944 INCOME TAX 
RETURN 

Avoid The Last Minute Rush 

For prompt and effective 
compliance with the New Tax 
Law, consult- 



ISRAEL ARON 

Accountant and Auditor 

32 E. 7th St. Covington, Ky. 
HI. 2718 



4- 



• » »' ' t " ■ 



5 



t 



FRAMES 

and MOUNTINGS 



A picture is not really com- 
plete until it is properly 
mounted or framed. Mount- 
ing not only protects the pic- 
ture but displays it to better 
advantage. 

You can get good frames at 
either of our studios at any 
time— tout right now the 
prices on some types of 
frames have been greatly re- 
duced. 

Should you have a. picture 
or any other article that 
should be protected or dis- 
played to better advantage 
bring It to us for framing. 



STEVENS 
STUDIOS 

804 Madison 639 Monmouth 

Covington m: Newport 

HE. 8908 HE. 9687 

"Good Portraits" 



Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 
News, Bugs Bunny Cartoon 

FEATURE STARTS 

Sunday: 2:38, 4:43, 6:25, 8:12, 9:59 

Monday 7:20 and 9:25 



TUESDAY 

FEBRUARY 13TH 



■NH UH ow l 

jr«A»Gr»<rt 
America* 




aUtt 

Also Disney Cartoon 
Feature Starts: 7:01, 9:21 

WED., and THURSDAY 
FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 14, 15 AND 16TH 



UBLIC 



I WILL OFFER FOR SALE AT MY FARM 3 Vz MILES FROM 
BURLINGTON ON THE EAST BEND ROAD, ON 



TUES 



~yr 




EDDIE BRACKDlEUA RADttS 



Also Selected Short Subjects 
FEATURE STARTS: 7:15, 9:10 



AT-l:0OP.M..CeWfj 

The following described property: Opt red e*w, with calf by 
side; one Jersey cow, to freshen by t^M saJe|one dark Jersey 
cow to be fresh in March; one Jersey cow to be fresh in April; 
one roan heifer cow to be fresh in March; oml black mare, 6 
years old, work anywhere, single line J, },corn crusher, good as 
new ; 1 cut of saw wood frame ; 1'hay f rame* 1 hand tobacco set- 
ter ;30 or 40 barrels corn in crib ;some corn in shock if not shuck- 
ed by day of sale; about 50 shocks fodder; 1 iron beam land 
plow; 1 wood beam land plow; 1 riding cultivator plow; 1 Ford 
V-8, 1935 model; one Model A Ford, and many others items too 
numerous to mention. 









Ml; I 



»■•? i' 



TERMS : CASH 



INVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
BUY WAR BONDS 

We Issue Them 



W. RANKINS 



OWNER 

LUTE BRADFORD, AuUiviieer 




taOMDAY. nSRCABY t, IMS 



THE BOON! COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 

Prom the Files of The Boone County Recorder 

ISSUE OF FEBRUARY tt, IMS 



Nonpariel Park 
flcyd Chipman and wife are re- 
joicing over the arrival of a fine 



W.E.TAIT,0.0. 

OPTOMETRIST 



SpecialWnc In the 

correction and 

protec tion of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 



■Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



WANTED! 

All kinds of Band Instru- 
ments—Accordions, Trumpets, 
Cornets, Saxa phones; 
etc. 

Phone or call 

HANSER MUSIC 

540 Madison HE. 7413 



baby girl since Sunday morning, 

Feb. 8th.^ 

Miss Jane Scott, of Villa Ma- 
donna, spent the week-end with 
her parents, George Scott and wife. 
Unoin 
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Williams and 
family, Mrs. S. C. Kicks and daugh- 
ter, Nell, spent Sunday with Mrs. 
J. B. Dickerson. 

Mrs. A. M. Holtzworth and Mrs. 
James Head were shopping In the 

city Monday. . 

Petersburg 
Rev. and Mrs. R. H. Carter, Mrs. 
J. B. Berkshire and Miss Irene 
Berkshire were shopping in Cin- 
cinnati, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Crisler, of 
Lawrenceburg, Ind., were guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Crlsler.^atupday 
night and Sunday. \S> 

Beaver Lick. 
Miss Rebecca Sleet, who is at- 
tending Wesleyan College, at Win- 
chester, Ky., spent the week-end 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C 
C Sleet 

Miss Kathryn Taylor, of Wesley- 
an College, Winchester, Ky., spent 
the week-end with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor. 
Waterloo 
Mrs. Addie Ryle and Mrs. W. G. 
Kite called on Mrs. G. A. Ryle, on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. J. A. Feeley is nursing her 
daughter and little grandson, Wil- 
liam Andrew. 

Grant R. D. 
Mr. Kerns and family have mov- 



V' 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 
FREE CHECKING 

R. Michels Welding Co. 



722 Washington St. 

xi l3d 



Covington, Ky. 



ed from Bast Bend to Wilbur 
Kelly's place. 

Mrs. Susie Scott is at Erlanger 
with her mother, Mrs. Aggie Ryle, 
who is very ill. 

Pt. Pleasant 
Mrs. Kate Tupman is spending a 
few days with her son, Will and 
family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Gross, Mrs 
Charles Darby and family, Miss 
Mildred Schwartz and Goebel Har- 
rington, spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. George Darby and family. 

Hopeful 

Born on the 6th to Albert Rob- 
bins and wife, a girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Clarkson and 
son Robert were the guests Sunday 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clore. 
Big Bone 
Mrs. Anna Dudgeon was the 
guest of her sister, Mrs. Edith 
Black, last Saturday. 

Mrs. Roy Pitcher and children, 
of Hamilton, were guests of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Hodges 
the latter part of last week. 
Flickertown 
Chas. Beemon and wife were the 
Sunday guests of Chas. Akin and 
family. 

Geo. ShinWe and family were 
the Sunday guests of Grason 
Shlnkle and family. 
Hebron 
. Born oh the 4th to Mr. and Mrs. 
W. A. Bullock a fine son, Wilford 
Earl. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Baker and 
two daughters of Ludlow, and Miss 
Nannie Lodge were the Sunday 
afternoon guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Baker. 

Francesville 
Mrs. Sadie Goodridge and little 
son Manlius of Taylorsport spent 
the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. 
Manlius Goodridge. 

Seymour Wilson visited his 
mother, Mrs. Eliza Wilson, of Ad- 
dyston, Ohio, Sunday. 

Erlanger 

John Lesher and family spent 
last Sunday with R. Feldhaus and 
family. 

Mrs. Chas. Craven, Mrs. Meyer 
and Mrs. Wood Stephens visited 
Mrs. John R. Whitson last Friday 
afternoon. 

Gunpowder 

J. S. Rouse spent Sunday after- 



noon with Ira Tanner and Mrs. 
Tanner. 

Ira Cummins and wife, of Cov- 
ington, visited his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Sam Cummins, last Sunday. 
Burlington 

Mrs. Lillle Garr, of Erlanger, was 
the guest of Mrs. Lorena Cropper, 
two or three days last week. 

Born, Sunday morning, Feb. 8th 
to Wilbur Kelly and wife, a 10 
pound boy. 

PETERSBURG 

— ^ y ,—. — 

Miss Elizabeth Walton was hos- 
tess to the Women's Missionary 
Society on Thursday for an all-day 
meeting. 

Mrs. O. S. Watts, Mrs. Albert 
Stephens and Mrs. M. K. Toadvine 
are on {he sick list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon are spend- 
ing some time with their daugh- 
ter. Mrs. E. J. Love and family. Mrs. 
Sheldon is improving nicely from 
a recent hip Injury. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ransom Ryle visit- 
ed Mr. and Mrs. Jack Ryle over 
the week-end. 

Mrs. Lyman Christy and Mrs. 
Arthur Alloway are improving 
slowly from injuries received in a 
fall on the ice. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Jarboe en- 
tertained Rev. and Mrs. Claude 
McDonald over the week-end. 

B. H. Berkshire has been con- 
fined at home for the past two 
weeks due to illness. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude McWethy 
were called here Monday on ac- 
count of the death of his mother, 
Mrs. Theresa McWethy. We ex- 
tend our sincere sympathy to the 
family. 

Dr. and Mrs. C. L. McWethy 
spent last Sunday with his mother 
Mrs. Eunie McWethy and his aunt, 
Miss Louella McWethy. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Chambers at- 
tended the Kreylich sale on Sat- 
urday. 

Miss Mary Hensley is convales- 
cing from her recent operation at 
the home of her sister, Mrs. Justin 
Dolph and Mr. Dolph. 



BUIXITTSVILLE 



Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson and 
daughter called on Mr. and Mrs. 
A. B. Ligon and son Thursday 
evening. Mrs, Nick Mlkkelson also 
was a caller and Rev. and Mrs. W. 
T. Gardner. 

Saturday evening guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Theo Birkle were Mr. and 
Mrs. BUI Mattox and son and Dor- 
othy Tipton. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Llgon and son 
entertained Rev. and Mrs. W. T. 
Gardner and Mr. and Mrs. Bern- 
ard Wilson and daughter, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Jones and 
children were guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Willie Jones, Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Rev. and Mrs. W. T. Gardner 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Hubert 
Llgon and son, Monday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson 
and family entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Art Simms and family Sun- 
day. 

Those on the sick list this week 
were Mrs. A. B. Ligon, Miss Dor- 
othy Tipton and Billy Ray Ligon. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Tipton and daughter were 
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Ligon and son. 

Mrs. Mayme Stevens of Fort 
Mitchell was a caller here Satur- 
day afternoon on Mrs. Emmett 
Elliott and Mrs. Fred Reitmann. 

Olin Elliott of the U. S. Army is 
home on furlough, visiting his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Elliott 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Clifford 
and son were guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Reitmann, Saturday aft- 
ernoon and evening. 



RETURNS FROM 36 

MONTHS OVERSEAS 

Pvt. Grant L. Matherly, after 36 
months overseas,, spent the week- 
end with his grandparents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. W. Matherly of Er- 
langer Road on January 21. 

Pvt. Matherly has returned to 
San Antonio Texas to enter a gov- 
ernment hospital for treatment for 
arthritis. He Is a member of Bur- 
lington Baptist church and has a 
host of friends In Burlington. 



SELL TOBACCO 

Harrison county 4-H club mem- 
bers exhibited 22,366 pounds of to- 
bacco at their annual show which 
sold for an average of $61.04 a 
hundred. The highest price was 
$57.40, received by Frankie Per- 
raut 



NORTH BEND ROAD 

Jake Blaker and Fred Reitmann 
called on Mr. and Mrs. William 
Reitmann, Thursday afternoon. 
' Mrs. Evelyn Wilson, of Hyde 
Park spent the week-end with Mr. 
and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and daugh- 
ter. 

The Sand Run W. M. S. met on 
Thursday at the home of Mrs. Eula 
Kilgour for their regular meeting. 
Those present were Mrs. Mildred 
Hamilton, Lucy Reitmann, Edith 
Jones, Myrtle Ryle, Alice Eggleston, 
Mabel Wilson, Julia Blaker, Bertha 
Judy, Emma Moore, Louise Wilson, 
Grace Henson and Kathryn Blaker. 

Ella Jean Washmuth spent Bin- 
day with Betty Jean Ryle. 

Elizabeth Stahl spent the week- 
end with her brother Mr. and lira. 
George Stahl and sons. 



Homer Davis of Whitley county, 
who is building up a Brown Swiss 
herd of cattle, recently purchased 
six registered head. 







Having sold my farm I will offer at Public Auction 
at my farm on Route 20, at Bullittsville, 

Kentucky, on 




Sale to begin at 10:00 A. M. 



LIVESTOCK— 3 horses, two aged 7 years, 1 age 
9, all good workers; 10 cows, three with calves 
and others to fresh in spring; 14 shoats, hogs. 

FARMING TOOLS — Road wagon with box bed 
and sideboards; hay frame; manure spreader; 2- 
horse sled; tedder; new hay rake; new mowing 
machine; 50-tooth harrow; new corn planter; 
practically new disc harrow; riding plow, all used 
two years; corn crusher with new belt; electric 
milk washer, 6-10 gal. cans strainer ;«6-tooth cult- 
ivator; smoothing and hinged harrow; pitchforks 
singletrees, doubletrees, posthole digger and 
shovel; iron wheelbarrow; several large boxes; 
extension ladder; roll of roofing; 2 iron kettles 
with spider; stack hay; 8 or 10 tons hay in barn; 
40 shocks fodders; 10 cow chains; crosscut saw; 



harness, bridles, collars; 1 breaking plow; double 
shovel plow; side saddle; one 14" John Deere 
breaking plow; and other things too numerous 
to mention. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Three-piece liv- 
ing room suite; dining room suite, consisting of 
12-foot round table, 10 leather bottom chairs, 
sideboard, sold as whole or separate; square 
table and six chairs; chifforobe; dresser; look- 
ing glass; coal vase; 10 or 12 chairs; lot of bed 
clothes including three good feather beds; lot of 
dishes; graniteware;'Southbend cooking stove; 5- 
burner builtin oven coal oil stove; kitchen cab- 
inet; glass safe; folding bed; several tables; cot; 
one iron bod; 1 half bed and walnut bed; 2 rugs, 
one good 9x12, one 10x12 ft. rug; one small rug. 



Terms Cash 



Lunch Served in Basement 





STEPHENS, 





AUU I : C. 1. LANCASTER 



The Farm Bureau in Hopkins 
county ordered 30,000 Blakemore 
strawberry plants, 3,000 Red Lath- 
am raspberries and 1,500 Boysen- 
berry plants. 



AN ELSMERE MAN FELT 
LIKE SWOLLEN BALOON 
FULL OF STOMACH GAS 

Recently, a Elsmere man stated 
that he used to feel like a swollen 
balloon after every meal. He would 
blot full of gas and spit up acidu- 
lous liquids for hours after eating. 
Was terribly constipated. This man 
is one of the hundreds in this vic- 
inity who now praise ERB-HELP. 
He states he was amazed at the 
results when he took this medicine. 
Now he eats what he wants with- 
out gas or bloating, and bowels are 
regular for the first time in years. 
He feels like a new man. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go ori suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP! Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. 



—COVINGTON— 

ARMY STORE 

U. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 
CERTIFICATION OF , 
AUTHORITY AG-095 

Military Accessories 

Insignia — Service 

Ribbons — Chevrons 

Patches 

Practical Needs 

—FOR— 

Service Men 

PANTS — SHIRTS 

CAPS — BELTS 

SOX — TIES 

SWEATERS 

GLOVES — SCARFS 

Furlough Bags & Kits 

Shine & Sewing Kits 

Money Belts, Etc. 

EF-KO 

ARMY 

—STORE— 

508 Madison Ave. 
COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 




Baby 
Chicks 

POULTRY EQUIPMENT and 
SUPPLIES 

OIL and ELECTRIC 

BROODERS 

METAL FEEDS - WATER 

FOUNTAINS 



,- POULTRY REMEDIES 
FUL-O-PEP and DR. HEINZ 
NU-WAY FEEDS 



I 




at -.. - I. POU1IPY 
ihai I H uiiyid 



512 Pike Covington, Ky. 

HE. 9168 Open Daily till 7 p.m. 






BLANKET 



SALE! 

72x84 Double Blanket, 25% Wool $|- 98 

by Nashua. Wide Satin binding ™ 

72x84 SINGLE BLANKET $^.98 

25 Percent Wool g 

TOBACCO COTTON 9 Feet wide $£.98 

100 Feet Long ** 

REG. $3.98 SKIRT$, pleated $2.98 

100 Percent Wool Slipover Sweaters $3.98 

CHILDREN'S SNO SUITS AT »/ 2 PRICE 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," 
"Poll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money i Worth or Hone. Bark 

ERLANGER, -:- . KENTUCKY 



Buy Your Hardware Early! 
if IS SCARCE . 

Jamesway 500-Chick Elec. Hovers '....$39.95 

Oakes 300-Chick Elec. Hovers 29.95 

Jamesway 500-Chick Oil Brooders 25.00 

All size chick feeders and fountains 

Flock Feeders, on legs 4.75 

Flock Heated Waterers on stand ...: 8.50 

Electric Units to build brooders 6.95 

Electric Water Heaters for Fountains 3.95 

Water Fountains for Barrels 2.95 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Tonic 

PTZ Capsules and Powder for Worms 

Hog Lye for Feeding Purpose 

5 and 10-Gallon Milk Cans 

Fence Stretchers 9.50 

Single Wire Stretchers 2.50 

Seed Sowers (Cyclone) 2.75 

Plenty of saws, axes, grub hoes, mattocks, picks 

iron wedges, posthole diggers and 

handles of all kinds. 

Large Selection of Harness 

PLANT BED FERTILIZER BY THE BAG 

NITRATE OF SODA BY THE POUND OR BAG 

OLIVER AND VULCAN CHILLED PLOWS 

Most all repairs for both 

GARDEN PLOWS - 3-SHOVEL CULTIVATORS 

SLED SOLES and BAR IRON 

GALVANIZED WATER PIPE and FITTINGS 
ELECTRIC WIRING MATERIAL 
ELECTRIC FENCE CHARGERS 
WIRE FENCE and BARB WIRE 
1 THORNHILL FARM WAGON 

1 COLE FERTILIZER and CORN DRILL 

Linoleum Rugs and Linoleum by Yard 

Heating Stoves and Coal Water Heaters 
30-Gallon Range Boilers 

PERFECTION 3-BURNER OIL COOK STOVES 
Grdte Baskets 20" and 24" 
Pedal Type Grindstone 
Electric Tool Grinders »Jt 

Large assortment of belts, pulleys and grinding , 

. wheels. 

CONRAD HARDWARE 



PHONE 23 



WALTON, KY. 



'* 



«MM 



■Mi 



mmmmmmm 



mmmmm m 



THE BOONS COUNT* BSOOBDO, BOBUNOTON, KKHTUOM 



= 



■»■ 



BELLEVIEW 

The G. A.'s met with Mrs. Chris- 
tena Klrtley, Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. Harry Ashcraft spent sever- 
al days last week with Mrs. Agnes 



Carr, of Carrolkon. 

Miss Betty Rogers spent Sunday 
with Miss Evelyn Rogers, of Pet- 
ersburg road. 

Miss Lucinda Burcham returned 
home Wednesday, after spending 




l£T US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZCER 

OPTOMLTRIST — OPTICIAN 
6>3i Madison Ave., Covington. K. 



T 



5 





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1 






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4 




























■ 

































several days with tier sister, Mrs. 
•jafuwpi jo 'usqstpo pna 

Mrs. Martha Wolfe and mother 
spent Saturday with Mrs. Alice 
Aylor. 

Pfc. Wayne Lanehart Is spend- 
ing a furlough with his parents and 
friends. 

Mrs. Wm. Kruse called on Mrs. 
Harry Ashcraft, Friday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Rogers and 
daughter were Sunday dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rog- 
ers, i 

Several from here attended the 
hall games last week at Burling- 
ton. __^ — _**-.. 

Bro. Edwin Smith was Saturday 
night guest of Mr. and Mrs. Allen 
Rogers and daughter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rogers and 
daughter and Miss Wills Deck call- 
ed on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ash- 
craft and daughter, Sunday even- 
ing. , 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Burcham and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. 
Sherman Burcham and daughter, 
Sunday afternoon. ■ 



RABBIT B^R 

Mrs. Edna M. Delptonas been on 
the sick list. 

8. B. Ryle celebrated his 8Mb 
birthday January 36. E. C. (Sore 
was his dinner guest 

Robt. Smith Is now driving Ryle's 
milk truck. 

Cpl. Marvin L. "Kelly and Velma 
L. Black were married last Wed- 
nesday. We wish them much happi- 
ness. 

Quite a few attended the sale of 
Albert Feldhaus, Saturday. He will 
move to Reuben Kirtley's farm In 
the near future. 

Harry Acra spent Wednesday 
with R. M. Wilson and wife. 

Wm. Delph moved this week to 
McVille from the Chas. Batchelor 



lose them 



farm. We "regret to 
from our community. 

Edgar C. Clore spent Wednesday 
night with H. M Clore and fam- 
ily. 

Mrs. Helen Buckler spent Friday 
with her mother and father, Mr. 
and Mrs. Elmer JarreH. 

Harold Hodges and Dorothy 
Delph attended a show In Erlang- 
er, Saturday evening. Several oth- 
ers attended from here. 

Mrs. Mattle Hodges called on 
Mrs. Mellie Wingate one day last 
week. 

Mr. Robinson and family will 
move from Jno Ryle's place to the 
place occupied by Ah Feldhaus and 
H. M. Clore will move to Jno Ryle's 
farm; Otis Slayback to the farm 
of H. M. Clore. "T^ 



NAVY NEEDS RADAR 



The United States Navy has U- 

a hew caB for mem qualified 
to study RADAR, the Navy's top 
drawer secret military weapon. 

Men between 17 and SO whether 
subject to Selective Service or not, 
are eligible to take the Eddy Apt- 
itude Test at the nearest Navy Re- 
cruiting Station. 

Men who pass the test win be 
given a letter of directed assign- 
ment to the Navy and will tie rated 
Seamen First Class hnrnedtetety. 
After initial training at 'boot' 
camp, such men will be sent to 
RADAR school for ten months and 
will, in most oases, graduate as 
Petty Officers. ' 

The Radio Technician {raining 



thus given 



is" 



Jobs hs 



highly skilled post-war 



hi the 



Radio and Shop Practice. A 
items to be studied bafn 
the examination may be 
at Hie nearest Navy 
Station. A high school 
while not required, Is of great as- 
sistance. J- 



John Catliff sold an 
24 dozen eggs a week 
Rhode Island Reds 
vember. 



from Mm 



.<■ •■ 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 PHONE 762 

N BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

* ■ 

PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed ....$2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet S 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.15 

32% Dairy Supplement : 3J25 

Big V^Laying Mash 3.40 

40% Hog Supplement ;>.75 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Ration 3.45 

55% Meat Scrap , 4.35 

41% Soybean Meal 3.05 

Ground Wheat 2.90 

Wheat Middlings 2.75' 

Wheat Bran .' , 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal -. *.. 2.85 

Hominy Meal « 2.85 

.e o til iry ocrni/C n ..*•••• . •••••• • ••••••«••• • ••* • • • ••••• • • • o •** v 

24% Brewery Grain ;, 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet 3.30 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt 1.25 

Block Salt ..g~ * 65 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to thank all our friends 
for the many kindnesses shown us 
during the death of our son. To 
those who sent cards and to Rev. 
Paul Rimmer for his consoling 
words. 

Adam Bell and Wife 



Jess England and family, of 
Hebron and Mrs. Nell Snow, of Cov- 
ington visited Arnold Easton and 
family, Sunday. 

During the past ye4fpMrs. L. C. 
Wood, a homemaker in Henry 
county, knitted 18 sweaters and 12 
scarfs for the Red Cross. 



LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 

— -COVINGTOH 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 

AH* CONDITIONED 



NOTICE 

The Frozen Food Locker Plant 
at Burlington will be in operation 
provided 180 signers can be obtain- 
ed In order to get priorities from 
the War Production Board. If "you 
are interested, please make known 
your desires by letter or telephone, 
Burlington 30. If you live within 
15 miles of Burlington you will be 
served by the plant. ■ 




THE AIR IS STRICTLY G.I. TO GEORGE 




Released by the Troop Carrier* 
he zoomed down on Station WHAS 



4 



GEORGE CARTRIDGE . . . WHAS* Special Events Producer and Direc- 
tor, came to us from out of the blue at Bowman Field. He had helped 
frodnce "All Clear,'* Air Corp s big show, weekly "Barracades" and Bowman 
ield's "Flying Time" Jo WHAS listeners. 

A native New Yorker, George had been on Eastern radio stations before 
the war. He has produced and directed War Bond, War Fund and Blood 
Donor's programs and likes G.Ls in unrehearsed appearances. Right now, 
he is helping produce thirty-minute transcriptions for boys on all fight- 
ing fronts, as per request of General Eisenhower. "A big hunk of home- 
town on a platter," these discs include current songs, topics of conversation, 
speeches and post-war plans for soldiers. In twenty-seven American com- 
munities assigned to perform this important service, local stations are co- 
operating' to make the discs fully representative of life "at home" in the 
states. 

If it's showmanship on the air 
look to 50,000-tvatt clear-channeled . " 



RADIO STATION 




MiiiiHm iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiuuiuiiiiiimiituiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilHllu 



• 









"My desire is to do 

everything within my power 

to free people from drudgery 

and to create . . . happiness 

and prosperity." 







ON February 11, America will again 
honor the memory of a man whose 
inventive genius — more than that of any 
other man — helped make this nation great. 

When Edison perfected the incandescent 
lamp and built the first practical central 
station electric system, he visualized elec- 
tricity as a servant of mankind that would 
bring release from drudgery and better liv- 
ing to everyone. Little did he realize that 
this same power would prove to be one of 
America's greatest assets in its hour of grav- 
est peril. 



THOMAS ALVA EDISON 

Feb. 11, 1847 - Oct. 18, 1931 



Today, electricity turns night into day in 
thousands of busy war plants across the land 
... speeds the endless flow of arms that as- 
sures the ultimate defeat of our enemies. 
Tomorrow, it will resume its interrupted 
march of progress, bringing new comforts, 
new conveniences, new benefits to m a nkind . 

i 

America's unchallenged leadership in the 
field of power production — -<a tower of 
strength in war—also assures this nation a 
leading role in building that better world 
that is sure to come when peace returns. 






■ 



CflMMUMTY PUBLIE SERVICE COMPMY 



INCORPORATED 



I ,_ 



rSj*~- 






' 



-\ 



PUBLIC SALE 

I will offer at Public Auction on the Mary Berk- 
shire farm, located on Woolper Pike, just 

off State Road 20, on 

FEBRUARY 17 




At 12:00 [CWT] 

THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED PROPERTY: 



LIVESTOCK —1 cow, Jersey and Shorthorn, to 
freshen in April; 1 Jersey and Shorthorn, fresh- 
en in May; 1 black Jersey milking now; 1 Jersey 
cow with calf by side; 1 Shorthorn Brown Swiss 
heifer, freshen in spring; 1 heifer, six months 
old; 1 team 5-year-old horses, work anywhere; 
one 9-year-old bay iriare; 1 black horse; 1 black 
mare 5 years old. 

FARM EQUIPMENT— 1 jumping shovel plow; 
one 5-shovel cultivator; one 14-inch Syracuse 
turning plow; 1 Rastus plow; one 60-tooth har- 



row; 1 David Bradley disc harrw; 1 Internation- 
al cultivator; 1 David Bradley 2-horse corn plant- 
er; 1 Model A Ford tractor on rubber; one 2- 
horse sled, same as new; 1 mowing machine; 1 
double set work harness; 4 horse collars; 4 halt- 
ers and bridles and check lines; 1 lot double trees 
and singltrees; 1 man saw. 



MISCELLANEOUS— 1 wood heater; 1 coal heat- 
er, heatrola type, good as new; 3 yonng turkey 
hens; 1 lot timothy hay, and many other articles 
too numerous to mention. - 



TERMS-CASH 



HUBERT BRADY, Owner 



QRD & DUNCAN, AUCTIONEERS 



& 



•' 



s 




■' 






THE BOONE OOUNTT RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



V 't 



■yor 



PEPPER-PEAK-FLORENCE TOBABCOWHSE. CO., 

Our Season Average for Tobacco Sold to date $48.46 






' ■ ; 



Think what this has meant to our many customers and what it could mean to those who have not sold with us. 



Tt- 






ROSS C. PEPPER 






\6 



5.o¥ 
538 



II 



\ 18*00 



;nfj<;.:^ 



>acco any time at one of our four ware 

-at ■ ; ~^— . ■ . ... Ht) W — ■«, ., , .,- , — ' ■ , ' — •« — •^ T 



"ftp" ,"'■ ' itonn' 



■ f":~lT,' |jj 



TO REGISTER. 



unload your 









. * 



;,l>f>U; 



-J. 






'EfrlENOE ME4NS ANYTHING IN THE TOBACCO BUSINESS, WE GOT 

-. : <•#. ■■-.-. . ■ > • • ■ - 

I ..■■ „ -V v 

W. B.' TUCKER FRAZER D. LeBUS CLARENCE LeBUS, JR. 

x>Tjr»Mc /ii«.w pnnNRiQft pwnxTK am PHONE 278 



FFH3EF 



J. R. PEAK 



V. D. FLORENCE 



PHONE 418-W 



PHONE 136 



PHONE 406 






t a 



Ln§tong R€Sid6nt 



* seVAfial jrears ago. Three sons sur- 
WWet*rgPaSS«tJwgS«l*,yardTnaster for the 



. Flora McNeely Mc- 
Wethy, 83, passed on January 29, 
at her home in Petersburg, Ky., 
where she was born and spent her 
entire life.' She was the last of a 
large family of twelve, her parents 
were Martha Jane and Perry Mc- 
Neely. 

She was the widow of the late 
Steven 8. McWethy, who preceded 
her to grave 28 years ago. To this 
union were born five sons, two, 



Wallace and Richard passed on 



■Big Hour railroad in Lawrenceburg, 
bookkeeper for the 
Coal arid Ice Co., in 
Memphis, Tenn., and Milton B. 
McWethy, an invalid at home. She 
leaves 10 grandchildren and 3 
great grandchildren, one grandson 
Robert, son of Milton is serving his 
country in Europe with the U. 8. 
1st army. 

{She was born March 27, 1861 and 
united with the Petersburg Chris 
tian Church quite young and was a 



|i I i 



SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Deliver— Phone 74 



BURLINGTON, 



.:. 



KENTUCKY 



MOTHER'S OATS, small box 15c 3 lb. box 30c 

CREAM OF WHEAT large box 25c 

CAMPBELL'S PORK & BEANS 16 oz. can 10c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can 10 pts. per can 14c 

CORN, White, whole kernel, No. 2 can,. ... . . 20 pts. per can 15c 

SPINACH, No. 2 can .10 pts. per can 16c 

SWEET POTATOES, No. 3 can 19c 

FRUIT COCKTAIL, No. V/t can 60 pts. per can 34c 

PEACHES, No. 2V4 can 60 pts. per can 29c 

CRANBERRY SAUCE, 16 oz. can 30 pts. per can 24c 

PRUNES, Sunsweet 2 lb. box 35.C 

NU-MAID MARGARINE . . . » 3 pts. per lb. 20c 

CHURNGOLD MARGARINE 3 pts. per lb. 27c 

LARD, Country 2 pts. per lb. 20c 

ORANGES per dozen 40c 

GRAPEFRUIT, pink meat 2 for 15c 

DELICIOUS APPLES per lb. 12c 

BOLOGNA 3 pts. per lb. 23c 

HAM SAUSAGE 3 pts. per lb. 40o 



•* 



: 



TOBACCO SEED 



41A - 16 Warner's Golden Burley - Twist Bud m 

Pratts N-K Worm Capsules 100 for 1.50 j 

Lee's Vapo Spray for Coughs, Wheezing, A 

etc., bottle 50c, 1.00 J 

Lee's Perch Paint, vaporizes in coldest £ 

weather, can ...;, 85c * 1,50 ^ 

Hess Panamin, 5 lbs. 85c ..< tf « 10 lbs. 1.50 £ 

Kow-Kare 60, $1.25 Bag Balm 60c £ 

Old Settler • Clears up Black Water % 

Chimney Sweep, Cleans soot etc., from-* — -*- £ 

stoves and furnaces, box 60c and 1,00 £ 

Golden Blend Coffee, the best in our store lb. 30c # 

I CEO. C. GOODE : 

• COVINGTON, •#£ KENTUCKY J 



faithful member until her health 
did not permit her to attend. 

Funeral services were held at the 
Petersburg Christian Church Wed- 
nesday, January 31st presided over 
by Brother Alexander, Methodist 
minister of Lawrenceburg, Ind., 
with burial in the Petersburg Cem- 
etery. \ 



CARD OF THANKS 

We desire to express our sincere 
thanks to everyone who assisted in 
any way during the illness and 
death of our beloved mother, 
Mrs. Minnie Hill Sellers 

Especially do we wish to thank 
our many kind, neighbors and 
friends for their kindness and sym- 
pathy; Mrs. Mary Clore, Dr. S. B. 
Nunnelley, Rev. W. T. Gardner, 
Smith & Reed, funeral directors, 
singers and all donors of flowers. 
Your efforts during our hour of 
sorrow will never be forgotten, lt-c 
The Hill Family 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our sincere 
thanks and appreciation to those 
who so willingly and thoughtfully 
gave of their time and talents, dur- 
ing the illness and death of our 
darling baby son, 

Darville Lee Aylor 
Especially do we want to thank 
Bro. Hogan and Bro. Branham for 
their kind words; and Mr. Stith 
for the kind efficient way. in 
which he conducted arrangements. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Wesley Aylor 



CARD OF THANKS 

May we express our heartfelt 
thanks to those far and near for 
every expression of sympathy and 
love shown us in the sudden pass- 
ing of our dearly beloved husband, 
son and brother, 

George Burton Yates, Jr. 

Especially do we thank the don- 
ors of the beautiful flowers; Rev. 
Leroy Evans, Rev. Leo Drake and 
Jlev. W. T. Gardner for their com- 
forting words; Chambers and 
Grutobs for their .efficient service. 
The Yates Family 
i 



Milium 

BOONE CO. FARM3 

54 ACRES— 1 mile from Burlington, on Highway 18, 1.8-acre 
tobacco base; 5-room house, electric, furnace, water in 
kitchen, sink, barn, meat house, crib, 2 poultry houses; 
two-thirds tractor land $6000.00 

LARGE BRICK BUILDING at Petersburg, on main corner, in 
good repair. Three large rooms on ground floor, large 
room on second floor. Building 40x60. Basement, 
cistern. Wired for electric. Will sell cheap. Make 
offer. Could be used as a business building or cut 
as Into living quarters. 

100 ACRES— 7-room house, 2 barns, electric. The tobacco crop 

this year sold for over $2000.00 $6000.00 

= 130 ACRES— On Ohio River, 3.2 acres tobacco base, 6-room 
house, 3 -room house, 3 barns, silo $8500.00 

= 142 ACRES— Ohio River, all bottom land of best quality; 5- 
room house, basement, furnace, bath; 2 large barns, 
large crib; 5-room tenant house $21,000.00 

50 ACRES— iy 2 miles from Burlington on blacktop road; barn; 
no house $3500.00. 

= 132 ACRES— 1 mile from Burlington, about 20 acres in good 
bearing apple orchard. All level tractor land; 5-room 
house, electric, 2 good barns. Well fenced; 2 ponds. 
In one family over 100 years $13,000.00 

SS 131 ACRES— West of Union, 3.6 acres tobacco base; 3-room 
house, electric, large dairy barn $6850.00 

150% ACRES— West of Union, 5 acres tobacco base; 6-room 
house, 3-room tenant house, dairy and tobacco barn; 

stanchions for 16 cows; other buildings $7,500.00 

■j 174 ACRES — 3 acres tobacco base; not a good location; old 
house; well watered, good land $4500.00 

E All of these farms can be financed. 

| A. B. RENAKER § 

= TEL. OFFICE 12 . BURLINGTON, KY. RES. 55 = 

^' f * J. G. SMITH. 83 = 



CLASSIFIED ADS 



RADIO WM1 at 
rates. COlonial 1121. 5M Scott 

61 



turkey 



TO TRADE— Young torn 
turkey for breeding purposes. 
Wm. Schwab, Burlington, Ky., R. 
1. lt-p 



A CARLOAD OF DAIRY COWS— 
Just received a carload of Brown 
Swiss Holstein and Guernsey 
dairy cows. These are all record 
Wisconsin cows with plenty of 
quality; all T. B. and Bang test- 
ed. Also 40 head of mares and 
.horses, aged 4 to 6 years; aU good 
chunks with plenty of quality; 
CHEAP. All stock guaranteed. A 
week's trial given. Easy pay- 
ments can be arranged. Hog feed 
$1.75 per 100 lbs. GENERAL 
DISTRIBUTORS, 30 E. Second 
St., Covington, Ky. Open Sun- 
day, lt-c 



WANTED— HAY; will buy a con- 
siderable quantity. General Dis- 
tributors, 30 East Second Street, 
Covington, Ky. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Team of good size 
horses, 6 and 8 years old, with 
harness. Priced reasonable for 
quick sale. Also large size childs' 
deck and chair, in good condi- 
tion. L. H. Congleton, Burling- 
ton, Ky., R. 2. Tel. Burl. 460. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Ford truck, or will 
trade for a small pick-up truck. 
General Distributors, 30 Bast 
Second St., Covington, Ky. HBm- 
lock 4267. lt-c 



FOR SALE— 10 tons wheat straw, 
baled; baled oats and alfalfa 
hay; several head fresh cows. M. 
C. Fisher, Florence, Ky. Tel. 
Flor. 726. lt-c 



MAN— To work In livestock sales 
barn; must know how to take 
care of cows; good salary. Apply 
GENERAL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 B. 
Second St., Covington, Ky. lt-c 



GUP THIS LIST AND SAVE IT 

POSTWAR SAYS: "THEY WILL ALL WANT A 
JEEP, A HOME, AND SOME LAND." (DONT WAIT) 



OUT DIXEE — 2 acres, nice new 7- 

room brick, all modern. 
10 ACRES — 10-room brick; hot- 
THANKS 1 water heat; level land, large lake. 

The robbers who broke into the ' $18,000. 
residence of Mrs. John O. Richards, 81 ACRES— On Route 42; a real 
Jr., November 23rd on Route 42, i home and location; by appolnt- 



have been apprehended in Cincin- 
nati on another charge. One has 
been sent to the reformatory and 
the other has been sentenced 



I wish to thank Deputy Sheriff ^modern home. 10 chicken coops, 



Irvin Rouse of Boone County, State 
Highway Patrol, Chief Tom Young 
and his men of Kenton County 
Police, Sheriff Jennings of Kenton 
County, Covington and Cincinnati 
Police and Mr. C. Dibowski of Ham- 
ilton County Juvenile Court for 
their diligent work. Without their 
untiring efforts the robbers would 
still be at large. lt-c 

John O. Richards 



Reg. $495 PKcher or Cistern Pomps .....; 3.68 

Beg. $11.95 Electric Bath Beaten , . . . . 0.95 

Beg. $16 JS Mother of Peart Toilet Seats .8.96 

Beg. $32.00 Mali Electric Drill :-"£t5 

Beg. $79J5 Cabinet sinks complete $59.95 

Beg. $12.56 Electric portable heaters JJ5 

Reg $136.56 W Bet air fnr»aee. ...... 160.05 

Beg. $22.50 Toilet tank and bowl r »•»* 

Beg. $1105 Laundry Traya, steel trtaimed 10.45 

■«*. $13.65 36-Gal. Hot water tank, X H. 12.50 

' StAO Pin-up Lamp with shade 2.98 

$3.49 MeUl bed lamp with cord . . £&& 

$96 35 Automatic electric waier heater " 9 !f 

Kei. $12.50 Floreseent desk lamp ..-••.•• •• »•*$ 

Beg. $78.56 Electric water systems (Pump) 74.50 

Beg. $3 J5 White steel medicine cabinet 3.45 

Beg. 90c Iren Cord 6' approred .70 

Beg. 61.49 Percolators 1-29 

FIR — VALVES — FITTINGS 

R. E. A WISING — CABINET SINKS — LITE FIXTURES 
WINKLER STOKERS — ELECTRIC WATER SYSTEMS 

BliMgrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAFANIRR SUPPLY CO.) /J 

121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 5726 1 



Final Notice 

To Unpaid Stockholders 

Of The Northern District 

Warehousing Corporation 

I now have prepared and In my 

possession checks for liquidating 

dividends drawn in favor of the 



ment. 
57 ACRES— Dudley 

buildings, $8500. 
39 ACRES— Charter 



pike ; good 
Oak Road. 



2 tenant houses, large barn; 

fenced; a real farm $15,000. 
12 ACRES— Charter Oak, nice land, 

buildings. $8000. / 

91 ACRES— East of ErtaStger^good 

buildings. $5500. ,' 

58 ACRES— Nice home; dairy barn. 

$JO,600. 
75 ACRES — 6-room house; electric. 

$7000. 
110 ACRES— Old Ky. Home Farm, 

Nicholson, Ky., best location in 

Kenton Co, $22,000. 
77 ACRES — 3-L Highway near In- 
dependence; nice home, dairy 

barn, $18,000. 
65 ACRES— On 3-L Highway; nice 

home, 2 bams. $15,000. 
81 ACRES— On good road, buildings 

6 cows, farm' tools. $4600. 

45 ACRES — 6 miles out, level, mod- 
owners of record of stock thereto em home mfiM . 

which will be delivered to said 20 AC reS— 4 miles out; new mod- 



owners or their representatives who 
will call at my office in Lee Build- 
ing, Carrollton, Kentucky, on or 
before March 1, 1945. Surrender 
of the Series "B" checks or of stock 
certificates not required. 

perry B. GAINES, Trustee. 



KENTON CO. SPECIAL 

123 ACRES, Green Pike; blacktop 
road; slick as a nickle, rich, pro- 
ductive, good laying farm, fenced 
and cross fenced with woven wire 
to hold anything (bull or mouse) ; 
buildings all modern, up-to-date 
6-room house, furnace, electric, 
cabinet sink, electric pump, front 
and back porch, garage, 2 large 

• chicken houses, milk house; 
(sanitary) dairy farm, tobacco 
farm; 6- acre base, tenant house, 
25 acres alfalfa hay. Also 18 
head of registered dairy cows, 
farm tools of every kind; a real 
show place; selling on account 
of old age and ill health: If you 
want a good farm, abundance of 
good water, come out, look for 
yourself. George Griffith, own- 

REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 

HE. 5107 Independence 5064 



ern home, $8400. 

10 ACRES— 10 miles out, modern 
home, $6500. 

12 ACRES— Concrete road; 4- room 
cottage, electric. $4500. 

10 ACRES- 40 miles out, modern 
home. $6500. 

12 acres — Concrete road; 4- room 
cottage, electric $4500. 

10 ACRES — 4-room cottage; elec- 
tric. $3500. 

3'/ 2 ACRES— Good buildings. 10 
miles out. $3700. 

12 ACRES— Dudley Pike; buildings. 
$8000. 

7 ACRES — 5 miles out; 6-room 1- 
floor. $7000. i 

5 ACRES— Nicholson; good build- 
ings. $4500 



ings $4000. 
91 ACRES— 8 miles out; nice home, 

dairy barn, rich land $5500. 
62 ACRES— 12 miles out; all kinds 

of buildings. $7500. 
ON TAYLOR MILL— 3 acres; new 

home; 2 chicken houses. $4750. 

OUT TAYLOR MILL— 5 acres; new 

4-room, not finished. $2200. r 

INDEPENDENCE— 4 acres; 4-room 

house, electric; $1000 down. $3,- 

500. 

8 ACRES— New 5-room stone 

house; nothing like it today. $9,- 

500. ' 

22 ACRES — Near new airport; nice 
and level, old home; adjoins air- 
port property. $3600. 
32 ACRES— On road near airport; 
colonial house, large barn, level 
land. $8000. 
77 ACRES— On State Rd., near air- 
port; level as a lake, fenced, good 
buildings; ' drop a plane in any 
field. $10,500. 
155 ACRES — Near Burlington; 
cheapest in Boone County; house 
and barn, 4 .ponds, cistern, 
springs and creek. $9500. 
75 ACRES— Near Route 42; house, 2 
barns, electric; nice location. 
$8000. 
38 ACRES— On Burlington Rd.; 
nice home, plenty water; nice lo- 
cation. $7000. 
240 ACRES— Near Burlington, good 
road, buildings, level land, elec- 
tric. $17,000. 
147 ACRES -Nicest in Boone coun- 
ty; buildings, barn; on 2 roads. 
$15,000. 
90 ACRES— Near Big Bone; build- 
ings $4000. 
BURLINGTON PIKE— 16% acres; 

near Florence. $3000. 
GUNPOWDER RD.— 12 acres; rich 

land. $1500. 
62 ACRES— Near Crittenden; to- 
bacco and dairy. $0500. 
110 ACRES— Near Walton; house, 

2 barns $8000. 
330 ACRES— On Dixie; modern 

house, 2 barns. $40,000. 
160 ACRES— Near Dixie; all level 
buildings. $14,000. 



FOR SALE— Four Jersey cows. Tel. 
HE. 8020. lt-pd 

FOR SALE— Six nice shoats, about 
75 lbs. 'each. Will sell separately 
also 750 lb. whiteface bull, a good 
one. E. Warren Utz, Union, Ky. 
Tel. Florence 748. •. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Economy King cream 
separator, size 24, in first glass 
condition. Changing to larger 
machine. Leroy Voshell, Peters- 
burg, Ky. lt-p 

FOR SALE — Good fresh cow with 
two-week-old calf. Ed Baker ^f 
near Hebron. Tel. Heb. 114. lp. 



WANTED— Man with family to 
raise 3 or 4 acres tobacco, 10 
acres corn and work by day when 
not in crop. G. B. Y$tes, Bur- 
lington, Ky. Tel. Burlington 
259. 33-2t-ch. 



FOR SALE— One aged horse, good 
worker. Edna Doan Farm, 3 
miles from Burlington, Ky., on 
East Bend Rbad. lt-p 



WANTED— Tenant to operate farm, 
raise tobacco, corn, hay, milk 
cows on shares. Tenant to fur- 
nish team and tools. M. Clark- 
son, Union, Ky. Tel. Florence 
534. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Large cow with sec- 
ond calf by side. $150.00. Phone 
Hebron 362. lt-c. 



LOST— Two dogs strayed from 
home in Ken taboo; one large fe- 
male and small male dog. Re- 
ward. Call Flor. 1493-W. lt-c 



FOR SALE— 1 new black and white 
porcelain tabletop cook stove, 
burns coal or wood; 1 Farmmast- 
er ' coal burning brooder, 350 
chick capacity, complete, like 
new; and 1 good electric Iron. 
Tel. Burlington 462. 33-2t-c 



7 ACRES— 12 miles out; old build 

DONT BE TOO LATE 

I EXCHANGE DIRT FOR DOUGH— YOU FURNISH THE DOUGH 
I'LL FURNISH THE DDIT 



REL C WAYMAN 



mXi 



623 WASHINGTON ST. 
HEm. 5107 



COVINGTON 
Ind. 5064 



WANTED TO RENT— Farm on 50- 
50 basis. Can furnish half of 
stock and all of tools, If neces- 
sary. Can milk 10 to 12 cows, 
raise 3 or 4 acres of tobacco. Can 
give reference. John Hopperton, 
Burlington, Ky„ R. 1. Tel. Heb. 
146. 33-2t-p 



FARMBRS! TRUCKERS— Ward's 
Drumlot sale on motor oil and 
grease is now to progress! Finest 
Perm, oil 50c a gallon, best Mid- 
Continent oil 38c a gallon to 55- 
gallon drums plus federal tax; 
100-lb. cup or H. P. grease $7.50. 
Montgomery Ward, 727 Madison, 
Covington, Ky. lt-c 



WANTED— Logs for making sled 
crooks Can be oak, ash, walnut, 
cherry, or red elm, 12 inches to 
diameter and over. Will pay 
good prices. Write W. A. Waters, 
Florence, Ky., or Tel. Burlington 
577. 32-tf. 



FOR SALE — 8 Duroc Jersey gilts 
to farrow first part of March; 1 
cow with 4 -week-old calf; 1 good 
work mare, weigh- 1400 lbs. B. 
C. Stephens, Petersburg, Ken- 
tucky. 32-2t-p 



LOST — Female fox hound, black, 
brown and white spotted, Dec. 24, 
1944, near Woolper Creek; with 
Joe Black name on callar. Re- 
ward $5.00. Notify Mr. H. F. 
Cummins, Route 1, Petersburg, 
Ky. 32-2t-p 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your oar and pays all 
legal damage claims, plus medic- 
al and hospital service costs to 
yon, family or guests If Injured. 
Prompt service. Save each. 
Walter Gaines, Petersburg; Joe \ 

*Dringenburr, Florence; Ryle Ew- 
bank, Warsaw, Ky. ofeb46 



FOR SALE— One extra good 7-year- 
old team of horses, weigh 1550 
lbs; sound, stogie line and per- 
fect workers. John Delahunty, 
Florence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 305. 22-2c 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road. This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf . 



WANTED— Tenant to tend 115 
acres, good land, Boone County; 
plenty water. Must have team, 
tools and sufficient help to raise 
4y 2 acres of tobacco, 15 acres corn 
15 acres hay; milk cows optional. 
E. Scherf , 800 Dixie Highway, Er- 
langer, Ky. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Four 
building lots, located to Carp- 
enter subdivision, Florence. Price 
$500. or will trade for cows or 
heifers. R. E. Eubanks, Ludlow, 
Ky., R. 2. 31-8t-pd. 



FOR SALE— Fresh cow with sec- 
ond calf by side. Lawrence 
Barnes, Petersburg, Ky., R. I. 

32-2t-p 



FOR WELL DRILLINO-^Call or 
. write Hubert Ferris, 3846 Read- 
tog Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210; Work guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 



INCREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. Pullorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. aired mattogs. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY, 
Paducah, Ky. . oaugl 



TWENTY YEARS in radio servicing 



Specialist, 600 Recti Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf . 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Five beef- 
type cows, to begin freshening 
In March, by a purebred Here- 
ford bull. Will trade for milch 
cows. R. L. Bowman, Ludlow, Ky. 
R.2. Tel. Heb. 187 32-2t-c 

FOR SALE— Team of farm horses, 
gelding and mare. Cheap. E. 
Grater, Union, .Ky. TeL Flor- 
ence 293. 32-tf. 



AVOID DISAPPODTTMRNT 
NOW 



Special This Week on 

SPRING FILLED LIVING 

BOOM SUITES 




DIXIE BARGAIN HOUSE 

221 Pike St. Cev. Co. 1756 



isksmstJ 



if- 






the Boone county Recorder 



ESTABLISHED- 1875 -,i 



VOLUME 6S 



T 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY Thursday, February is, imj 



^S* 



«w 



&& 



j^nf 




CONSTANCE BOY 
REPORTED KILLED 



WHILE FIGHTING WITH U. S. 
ARMY IN GERMANY-SON OF 
MRS LAURA KINDLE— OVER 
SEAS SIX MONTHS. 



Staff Sgt. George H. Kindle was 
reported Wiled In action in Ger- 
many January 9th, while fighting 
with the U. 8. Army according to a 
telegram received by his mother 
Mrs. Laura Kindle, of Constance, 
Ky.' 



Hebron Fives Take 
Three Games From 
Burlington, 



=35 



esc 



S-Sgt. Kindle received his train 
ing at Camp Wolters, Texas, and 
Camp Ogdett, Oregon, before being 
sent overseas six months ago. He 
entered the service thirty-eight 
months ago. 

He attended school in Constance 
and was well known throughout 
this section. Another brother 
Frank Kindle, la stationed with the 
U. 8. Army in England. 
He is survived by his mother, and 
! four brothers, Kelly, John, Cecil, 
v and Frank Kindle. 
\ The telegram received by Mrs. 
Kindle follows: 

r ^The Secretary of War desires 
me to express his deep regret that 
your son Staff Sergeant George H. 
Kindle was killed in action on 9th 
of January in Germany. Conflrm- 
'ing letter follows. J. A. Ullo, AdJ 
General." 

Sgt. Herman Smith Missing 
Mrs. Blma Marie Smith, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Willard Ryle, 
of Grant, Ky., received a telegram 
from the War Department stating 
that her husband Sgt. Herman 
Smith has been reported missing 
in action since the 26th January in 
Luxembourg. . 

The telegram follows: 
"Mrs. Elma M. Smith 
1S5 Main St. 
Rising Sun, Ind. 

"The Secretary of War desires to 
express his deep regrets that your 
husband Sgt. Herman Smith has 
been reported missing in action 
aince the 35th of- January in Lux- 
embourg. If further details or 
other information are received you 
will be promptly notified. J. A 
Ullo, Adj. General." 

Sgt. Smith was serving with Gen 
Patton's Third Army. He is a mem- 
ber of the 80th Infantry Division 
Sgt. Smith has been in the ser- 
vice two years and had been over- 
seas eight months. 



Friday night Hebron's hoopsters 
Journeyed to Burlington, where 
they trounced the locals In three 
games on the hardwood. 

Hebron's high school boys were 
easy winners over the Burlington 
boys by a 47-13 count. Hebron 
took an early lead and ma i n ta in ed 
a safe margin throughout the 
game. Stephens was high point 
man for Hebron with 14, while 
Loomis Was high for Burlington 

with 4.. 

In a preliminary game, Hebron 
reserves wore victorious over the 
Burlington reserves by a score of 

84-13. 

Hebron's Independent five em- 
erged on the long end of a 46-38 
count over Burlington* Independ- 
ents in the final gaakftfet the even 
ing. 




Grandson of L-M. Johnson 
Confined To Navy Hospital 

Seaman First Class, Robert G. 
Loomis, Co. 38, Mclntire Unit, Ra- 
dar Group, Great Lakes, HL, is re- 
ported to be confined to the Naval 
Hospital, suffering from an attack 
of scarlet fever. He is receiving his 
"boot" training at the naval sta- 
tion there. j/\ 

Seaman Loomis is a grandson of 
Conservation officer E. M. Johnson 
of Walton. 



BUREAU BANQUET 
TO SET RECORD 



IN ATTENDANCE, ACCORDING TO 
REPORTS— PLANS MADE FOR 
TWO HUNDRED— TICKETS ARE 
ON 



Utopia Meeting 

Date Is Changed 

The February Utopia Club meet- 
ing date has been changed from 
February 22nd to Wednesday night, 
February 28th, according to Grant 
Maddox, president. The change of 
date is made so that W. W. Magill, 
fruit specialist from the College, 
may be the guest speaker. The 
meeting will be held at Burlington 
at 8:00 p. m. on the later date. 



PROJECT WORK TO 
BE SUPERVISED 



The 1M6 Farm Bureau banquet 
to be held at Burlington school 
auditorium on Friday evening, 
February 33rd, is expected to set a 
record for attendance, according 
to Walter King, president. Two 
hundred farmers, members of their 
families, arid friends are expected 
to attend. 

County 4-H Club champions and 
county garden and live at home 
champions will be honored by the 
Farm Bureau at the banquet. 
Guest speakers from the State 
Farm Bureau and adjoining Coun- 
ty Farm Bureaus have made plans 
to attend. * 

Banquet tickets are on sale from 
Farm Bureau officers and direct- 
ors and at the agricultural offices 
in Burlington. 



MEMBERSHIP GOAL 
REACHES HUNDRED 



IN FARM BUREAU ORGANIZA- 
TION—LARGEST MEMBERSHIP 
SINCE COUNTY FARM BUREAU 
WAS ORGANIZED. 



Farm Bureau membership reach 
ed the 100 goal this week, accord 
ing to Walter King, president. This 
is the largest membership since 
the County Farm Bureau was or- 
ganised three years ago. The di- 
rectors feel that Boone County 
should have 500 members support- 
ing the-State and National Farm 
Bureau programs. 

The February 15th Boone Coun- 
ty Farm Bureau membership In- 
cluded the following farmers and 
farm leaders: 

J. C. Aylor, R. Z. Asbury, J- C. 
Acree, Aylor Bros., J. C. Bedlnger. 
Ben F Bedlnger, Charles Beall, 
John Boyer, John Burns, Sam 
Blackburn, John Boh, B W. Brink, 
Willie Buckler, Sherman Durcham, 
Conner Carroll, L. H. Congleton, 
John W. Conrad, John Conrad, Or- 
ville Conrad, H. L. Crlgler, John E. 
Crlgler, W. W. Crlgler, Ralph Ca- 
son, Mark Cook, Virgil Campbell, 
Cecil Conner, Harry Coppage, 
Douglas Daley, Jdhn P. Dolwiek, 
Val B. Dolwiek, J. W. Dolwiek, Gil- 
bert Dohvick, Wilford Dixon, Elmer 
Elllston, Shirley Ferguson, H. R. 
Forkner, Bill Feldhaus, 4 Joel Gray, 
R. C. Garrison, Edgar Graves, J. W. 
Grant, Harry Gulley, Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, George Hell, C. L. Hemp- 
fling, Chas. Hempfllng, Vaughn 
Hempfling, William Hill, Joseph 
Huey, Lasslng Huey, J. H. Huey, 
Harper Construction Co., J. B. 
Heizer, OrviUe Httisley, W. P. Hol- 
lis, J. C. Hollis, C. G. Jones, Arthur 
Jones, W. W. King, R. E. Klrtley, 
John Klopp, Orvllle Kelly, Roy 
Lutes, Pearl McGlasson, W. H. 
Moore, D. H. Norris, W. M. Presser, 
j. G. Pennington, O. W Purdy, 8. 

D. S. Ransom, E. Y. Randall, G. C. 
Ransom, A. B. Renaker, O. R Russ, 
Joseph Ryan, J. E. Rlddell, *. H. 
Rouse, R. R. Ragland, Lillard 
Scott, Beckham Shields, Lloyd 
Siekman, Fred Siekman, W. M. 
Smith, Sparks & Sparks, John T 
Stevens, Wilton Stephens, James G. 
Smith, W. J. Scott, J. B. Scroggin, 
Dorothy Souther, Benjamin Step- 
hens, John Terlau, C. W. White, H. 

E. White, Jess Wilson, George Wal- 
ton, Ray Walton, Albert Willis, and 
Robert Youell. - 



NUMBER OF PUBLIC 

SALES RRWICE NEWS 

We are foretd to omit 
many news items from this 
issue due to the number of 
public sales swearing this 
week. We were forced to turn 
down one* sale due to lack of 
space/being completely filled 
up Monday evening. • ., 

Persons desiring us to 
carry their sales should noti- 
fy us early » order that wt 
can reserve a place for their 
advertisement. Had wo had 
the proper amount of time 
we could have printed addi- 
tional pages, but time does 
permit for this issue. 
• •••••*•••* 



Used Fat Situation Rente 



RED CROSS QUOTA 
SET AT $6,800.00 



ACCORDING TO FIGURES RE- 
LEASED BY COUNTY CHAIR- 
MAN IRVTN ROUSE— DRIVE TO 
GET UNDER WAY MARCH 1. 



Used fats are needed now more 
than any period during, the war. 
The War Food Administration 
needs every drop and mora during 
1945. 

Boone County housewives can 
help by making a renewed effort to 
save kitchen fats, strain them into 
metal containers and turn them 
in for the usual two red points per 
pound. The quality of salvaged 
fat is deteriorating, so make sure 
that all drippings are put through 
a coarse strainer in order to re- 
move particles of meat and for- 
eign matter. 

Fats and oils for. industrial pur- 
poses are going to be scarcer dur- 
ing the next twelver months. Few- 
er hogs and cattle will be slaugh- 
tered so the quanti" 
f at, tallow, and gr< 
dustry will be » 
large quantities of 
used by industry 
year will be re 
purposes in 1945. 

Salvaged kitchen \ fats go into 
the general pool of Inedible tallow 
and greases and about a quarter 
of it is used in the manufacture of 
lubricants and for other industrial 
purposes. The rest finds its way 
into soap, with about a fourth of 
the soap being usee for wax pur- 
poses. Glycerol, a by-prcduet of 
soap making, is used for synthetic 
rubber, explosives, and other war 
products. 

Be sure the grease is in a metal 
container. If you do not have a 
lid, cover with waxed paper and 
tie with a string. 




of lard, pork 

going to in 

ced. In fact, 

d which were 

the past 

for eating 



Twins 01 



Comity tfri Heroes 



Boone County's quota in the Red 
Cross War Fund drive to begin 
, i March 1, has been set at $6,800.00, 
, jit was announced Wednesday night 
, I February 7th by County Chairman 
Irvin Rouse, at a meeting of pre- 
cinct chairman in the courthouse, 
Burlington. 

Quotas were assigned each pre- 
cinct, and supplies were passed out, 
so that work on the drive could be- 
gin promptly on the first day. Any 
chairman not receiving his supplies 
shoud do so at once by contacting 
Mr. Rouse. 

Plans for a "kick off* meeting 
for the public, to be held the lat- 
ter part of February were discuss- 
ed, and It was announced a War 
movie had been secured for the 
event. Watch this paper for the 
exact date, to be announced later. 

A list of precinct chairmen and 
their quotas follows: 

Beaver, $244.07, Mrs. Joe Heiser; 
Belleview, $257.17, Miss Kathryn 
Clore; Hebron, $580.15, Mrs. J. C. 
Aylor; Bullittsvllle, $225.00, Mr. J. 
W. Whitaker; Burlington, $898.71, 
Mrs. J. G. Smith; Carlton, $233.79, 
Mrs. John Ryle; Constance, $364.50, 
Mrs. George Kottmyer; Florence, 
$1,180.33, Mrs. Lewis Houston; 
Hamilton, $217.16, Mrs. J. C. Acree; 
Petersburg, $356.47, Mrs. Alberta 
Stephens; Union, $529.43, Mrs 
Joseph Huey; Verona, $321.70, Mrs 
Grover Ransom; Walton, $1,04653, 
Mrs. Helen Jones; Richwood, $256, 
Mrs>Robert G. Robinson. 



The old neighboTs, friends, rela- 
tives and an of the Maple of 
Rswn> County wish to congratul- 
ate Chrrie Graves Dove, formerly 
of the Bullittsvllle community up- 
on the wonderful achievement* of 
her twin soldier sons. Tfc 
are the sons of Captain 
Dove of World War I, whose quiet 
unassuming manner la 
ed by.all who ever knew hfcn, al- 
though he has passed to his re- 
ward many years ago. 

Bob Dove has been wounded in 
the Belgium area and Is not yet 
back to action. Lt. John (Jack) 
Dove has also been wo d nda l bat 
has returned to action. He was 
of the officers of the Sixth 



BITING COWS, HOGS 
OTHER STOCK 

as*"™" 



• 




one 

Rangers who passed 35 miles thru 
the Jananese Unas and w#h the 
assistance of some native Filipinos 
killed about 150 Japanese 
and carried 51S prisoners of 
from the Japanese prison camp to 
safety, leaving In all 628 dead 
Japanese to their wake. 

Boone County congratulates yon 
Carrie, as well as your soldier sons, 
and may-they, and ours, return to 
us well and strong when this con- 
flict ends is our prayer. 



SCOUTS TO SPONSOR 

PAPER DRIVE SUNDAY 

The Boy Scout Troop of Florence 
will sponsor a scrap paper drive 
on Sunday afternoon from 1:30 to 
5:00 p. m. All persons are asked to 
cooperate. 






■ 



a*. 



Housewives Urged To 

Protect Kitcheo Tools 



AGED LADY DIES 
AT LIMABURG 



Steve McDaniel, of Gunpowder 
killed a mad dog near his 
last week, after it had 
through Waterloo and Rabbit 1 
biting several head of cattle and 
anything with which it came to 
contact 

The dog. a German ponce and 
Shepherd mixed bit several pure- 
bred Jersey cows owned by Jack 
Purdy of Waterloo, and btt hogs, 
chickens and other animals with 
which it came to contact. 

A report from the bacteriological 
laboratory of the University of 
Kentucky states that, the head 
of the dog was positive for rabies 

Persons throughout the section 
visited by the dog should exercise 
every precaution to prevent the 
spread of rabies, by keeping their 
dogs confined and Observing thler 
livestock carefully. . 

The report from the University 
of Kentucky follows: 

The bacteriological laboratory 
Of this department reports that an 
examination of the dog head sub- 
mitted by you and delivered to the 
laboratory on February 8, 1945 by 
bus, gave the following results: 

'Lab. No. 266782, Specimen: Dog 
head, owner, stray; examin ation 
positive for rabies. 

"Inasmuch as the examination 
of the brain indicates that this an- 
imal was Infected with rabies or 
hydrophobia, anyone exposed to 
the saliva through handling or 
feeding or from having been bitten 
within a period of ten days prior 



SERVICES HELD 
ERLANGER. 



SATURDATAT 



Good 
knives, 
market 
protect 



Date Announced For 
.. Leaders' Training Class 



• 



CLOSELY DURING TE AR, A C- 
CORDING TO COUNTY EXTEN- 
SION' OFFICE— EIGHT COM- 
MUNITY CLUBS ORGANIZED. 



fr 



Boone County 4-H Clubs are 
planning an efficient community 
organization in 1945, according to 
the County Extension offices. 
Four-H project captains and adult 
leaders this year are planning to 
more closely supervise project 
group work and to render^ greater 
assistance in record keeping. 

Eight community clubs including 
Grant, Petersburg, New Haven, St. 
Paul, Burlington No. 1, Burlington 
No. 2, Hebron and Qpnstance were 
organized the past week. Hamil- 
ton and Florence Clubs are sche- 
duled to organize on Friday and 
Walton and Verona On Monday. 

Community clubs will be divided 
into project groups where five or 
more members are enrolled oln one 
project. Each project has one or 
more adult leaders and a group 
captain who supervise project act- 
ivities. Major agricultural projects 
this year will include garden, dairy 
tobacco and farm labor service. 
Minor agricultural projects will in- 
clude corn, hogs, beef, and sheep. 
Home Econ6mlcs projects will In- 
clude - foods, clothing, canning, 
home labor service, and room im- 
provement. 

All -boys and .girls ten years or 
older who are interested In carry- 
ing improved farm and home pro- 
ject work are ^invited to be 4-H 
Club members. ^Enrollment cards 
are available at the County Ex- 
tension Offices or from community 
club officers or adult leaders. 



Home furnishings leaders In the 
Homemakers' Clubs will hold their 
second training class Wednesday, 
February 21st. The day meeting, 
10:30 a. m. to 3:60 p. m, will be 
held at the home of Mrs. John L, 
Vest In Walton. Two leaders from 
each of the eleven Homemaker 
Clubs In Boone are invited to this 
meeting. 

Miss Vivian Curnutt, home furn- 
ishings specialist, University of 
Kentucky, will present the lesson 
on window treatment. Leaders 
will give this lesson to local clubs 
in March. 



Local Jersey Herd 

Has High Rating 



Number of Boone 

Countians Work At 

Ft. Thomas Hospital 



County Kitchens Become 
Tin Mines For War Items 



Women of Boone County can 
"mine" tin sufficient for 350 l Vi 
ton Army trucks this year. 

These figures were compiled by 
J. A. Stewart, vice-president of the 
American Can Conipany, on the 
basis of canned foods consumed by 
civilians In the county during 1943. 
On the basis of last year's con- 
sumption, civilians will open 876,- 
420 cans of .foods this year, he said. 
According to a table recently issu- 
ed by Washington, 2,500 cans pro- 
vide tin sufficient for one ity-tbh 
Army truck. ' •'' 

Meanwhile, the armed forces 
consumed approximately three bil- 
lion cans of food during 1943 and 
needs for the current year are ex- 
pected to rise to three and a quart- 
er billion cans, Mr. Stewart said. 
He points out that with a greatly 
Increased number of the armed 
forces in overseas duty, more can 
ned foods will be needed because 
the can has proved the most prac 
tical container for the shipment of 
foods abroad. 



The W. G. Kite registered Jersey 
herd of Burlington, Ky., was re- 
cently officially classified accord- 
ing to a report from The American 
Jersey Cattle Club, New York. The 
official who went over each cow In 
the herd Individually comparing 
her to the model of the breed in 
type was Professor S. M. Salisbury 
of Ohio State University. 

Eight animals in the Kite Herd 
averaged 80.63 percent on a score 
card basis. Included In this aver- 
age are five Good Plus and three 
Good Individuals. The animals De- 
sign Elverian Sue 1332683, Elverian 
Lady Love 1352653, Alta Majesty 
Design 1270748, Design Carmel 
Princess 1397062 and Design Alte 
Girl 1195570 were rated Good Plus. 

The registered Jersey herd of 
Jeannetta Kite Purdy was also re- 
cently officially classified accord- 
ing to a report from The Ameri- 
can Jersey Cattle Club, New York. 

Six animals in the Purdy herd 
averaged 80.83 percent on a score 
card basis. Included in this aver 
age are two Very Good and four 
Good individuals. The animals 
Alfriston Noble Design 1195572 and 
Baby Spotted Design 1263843 were 
rated Very Good. 



Despite the continued bad weari- 
er I am very happy to give you 
the following list of women who 
worked at Ft. Thomas in January, 
and the number "of hours that 
they gave through the medium of 
the Red Cross: Miss Alice Ander- 
son,; Miss Dorothy Bessler, 5; Miss 
Mary Bess Cropper, 6; Mrs. Oleva 
Dolph, 32; Mrs. Marjorle Freeland; 
2%; Mrs. R. C. Garrison, 6; Mrs. 
Harold Martin, 6; Mrs. Elizabeth G. 
Nestor, 12; Mrs. Helen Snyder, 34; 
Miss Patricia St. Germain, 9; Mrs. 
LulO Tolin, 21; Mrs Wm. Townsend 
12%; Miss Billy e Wilson, 6, mak- 
ing a grand total of 154% hours for 
the month of January, according to 
Mrs. Elizabeth Goodridge Nestor, 
chairman Volunteer Special Ser- 
vices, Boone County Chapter, Am- 
erican Red Cross. v - 



Mrs. Ruth Clore, of Covington is 

quite ill at St. Elizabeth Hospital. 



: • .'. ; 



Easton-Roberts 



"A very pretty wedding was sol- 
emnized Saturday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 10th, 1945 at 3 o'clock, when 
Miss Nellie Virginia Easton and Ed 
Roberts were unltedLln marriage by 
Rev. tj. E. Bedlnger of Walton. The 
brides mother, Mrs. Idella Easton 
and sister Carrie Marie were the 
only attendants. 

The bride is the eldest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Omer Easton, Of 
near Independence, Ky. She has 
many relatives and friends In 
Boone and Kenton Counties who 
will be surprised to learn of .the 
event. The groom Is a native of 
Owenton, Ky. 

A lovely wedding supper WW 
served after the ceremony at the 
home of the bride's parents. 

The best wishes of a host of rel- 
atives and friends are extended to 
this fine young couple. 



MICHIGAN BOYS 
ARRESTED FRIDAY 



CHARGED WITH STEALING OAR 
OF LUTE BRADFO RD— PLACED 
UNDER $1000.60 BOND— AWAIT 

action of grand- 



two Dearborn, Michigan youths 
are being held in Burlington Jail 
in default of $1000.00 bond, charged 
with stealing the car of Col. Lute 
Bradford at Florence Friday after 
noon of last week. 

Bradford, who had parked his 
car on the streets of Florence, re- 
turned In a few minutes to find his 
gone. He. reported the loss to 



kitchen tools, especially 
are hard to find on the 
The housewife needs to 
tools used daily In the 
kitchen, according to Mary Hood 
Gillaspie, Home Demonstration 
Agent. — *— 

More thought given to the prop- 
er care of kitchen knives would 
save time and labor for many a 
housewife, and make for better 
meals and more safety in- the kit- 
chen. Home equipment specialists, 
of the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture say that knives are the most 
used — and abused — of any kitchen 
utensil. Today good knives are too 
scare and valuable to be dulled or 
chipped by knocking about in a 
drawer with other utensils, or put 
to the wrong uses. 

Many knives are broken by using 
them to open cans or pry up lids. 
Knife blades also may be broken 
by sudden changes of temperature. 
A knife at room temperature should 
not be used to slice a brisk of hard- 
frozen Ice cream. Run cold water 
over the knife to chill lt before- 
hand. Never let wooden-handled 
knives soak In dish water, because 
this swells the wood and may loos- 
en the handle. 

A knife rack that keeps each 
knife, lined up in its separate slot 
saves knives and time for the cook, 
and is easy for any home carpent- 
er to make. A strip of wood, with 
silts sawed In, may be fastened in 
a kitchen drawer that Is deep 
enough, or may be fastened on the 
wall, out of reach of children but 
in easy reach of the cook. Such a 
rack saves the hurried housewife 
from pawing through the miscel- 
laneous articles In a drawer, tak- 
ing the first knife that comes to 
hand, and then wasting time and 
food by peeling potatoes with a big 
slicing knife or hacking off bread 
or meat In trying to slice with a 
little peeling knife— to give two 
examples. , . 

A sharp knife does the best Job 
and Is actually safer than a dull 
knife. A dull knife is difficult to 
direct, and often slips and causes 
cuts. Sharpening may be done on 
an oilstone, or with any of the 
various kitchen sharpening devices. 



Mrs. Harriett Utz, 92, a native of 
Boone county passed away Thurs- 
day at her home in Limaburg. She 
was well known throughout this 



WAS OLDEST MEMBER OF HOPE- 
FUL LUTHERAN CHURCH— [^ the first symptoms, should take 



section and was probably one of the 
oldest women of the county. 

Mrs. Utz was a member of the 
Hopeful Lutheran Church, being 
the oldest member of that church. 
She was a lifelong resident of this 

county. 

Funeral services were held Sat- 
urday at the Philip Taliaferro fu- 
neral home, Erlanger at 2:30 p. m. 
Burial was In Hopeful Cemetery. 

Philip Taliaferro, Erlanger fu- 
neral director was in charge of 
arrangements. 



the Pasteur or anti-rabic treat- 
ment Immediately to guard against 
contracting the disease. 

Linwood A. 

i 

■- ! 






Hog Specialist 

To Address Fanners 



Boone Farmers Sells 



Prof. R. W. Plfer, Instructor to 
hog production at the University 
of Kentucky, will address Boone 
County hog raisers at Bur- 
lington courthouse at 1:30 p. m. 
on Tuesday afternoon, February 
20th, according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent All farmers are in- 
vited to attend. 

This will be the first hog meet- 
ing to be held hi the county in 
several years. During this period 
much progress in parasite control, 
I breeding, and more efficient feed- 



CropS For Nigh Averages ing practices have been made. Mr. 



William Hill, Idlewild farmer sold 
part of his crop raised on his farm 
near Idlewild, last Thursday for 
an average of $56.47 per hundred 
weight. - .. s 

Mr. Hill reported that he did not 
reach the ton per acre, to entitle 
him to be a member of the club, 
but that he was well satisfied with 
his average. He sold a total of 8048 
pounds, and has more tobacco to 
put on the market thliOyear. 

Virgil Vice, Woolper farmer sold 
2762 pounds of tobacco Thursday, 
February 8th for an average of 
$57.09. The two high baskets sold 
for 58 cents and two low baskets 
for 56c. This crop was grown on 
2.1 acres. 

L. R. Vice sold 2756 pounds on 
the same day for an average of 
$57.25. His high basket brought 
58 cents and his lowest basket was 
66 cents. His crop was grown on 
2.3 acres. 



Pif er is rated as one of the most 
qualified men in the state to dis- 
cuss these practices. 



J. M. 

writing. 



Eddins remains ill at this 



ear 

Deputy Sheriff Irvln Rouse, who 

broadcast an alarm. 

The youth, Leroy Wilson, 17 and 
Carl Slatton, 17, of Dearborn, were 
apprehended Friday night at Mt. 
Vernon, Ky., by State Highway 
Patrolmen. 

State police notified Sheriff 
Olenrose Williams that the boys 
were being held at Mt swif^f. 
and Deputy Rouse called for them 
and returned them to Burlington. 
They will be held for action of the 
Boone County grand Jury will be 
In session in April. . 



ii u 



a 



10 *i ">.nfb9H 

Union Masonic Lodge 
Makes Contribution To 
Convalescent Hospital 



A most generous contribution to 
the Boone County Fund for use at 
the aaf Convalescent Hospital, Ft. 
Thomas, has been received from 
the Masonic Lodge of Union. 

Thf ri»T»v«> of this group will be 
added to the framed list of or- 
ganizations participating in 
project, now on display In the 
Boone County Day Room, building 
twelve. 



Blood Quota Is Exceeded 
During Year 1944, Is Word 

Exceeding its quota for the 
fourth straight year, the American 
Red Cross Blood Donor Service In 
1944 procured 5,371,664 pints of 
blood for the armed forces, or 371,- 
664 pints more than their estimated 
requirements, it was announced by 
Basil O'Connor, Red Cross National 
Chairman. 

The 1944 record represents an 
average of ten pints of blood a 
minute day and .night throughout 
the year, add brings to 11,024,015 
pints the total amount procured 
since the inception of the project 
to. February, 1941, Mr. ©*©annor 
stated. He said that the Army and 
Navy have requested the Red Cross 
to continue procurement In 1848 at 
the present rate of 5,000/100 pints 
a year. 

Many pe/sons from Boone Coun 
ty give their blood regularly at the 
Blood Donor Center In Cincinnati 
Those who are unable to do 
may still participate in the gs 



HOLDUP MAN GIVES 
NAME OF LOCAL BOY 



WHEN SHOT BY BARTENDER AT 
JACK'S TAVERN SATURDAY- 
HAD STOLEN PURSE OF GUT 
BUTLER OF UNION. 



Charles Roberts, 28, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, who iras arrested last Sat- 
urday by Kenton County police, 
following an attempted holdup at - 
Jack's Tavern, Dixie Highway. 
Lookout Heights, gave his name as 
Guy Butler, of Union. 

Ponce found a wallet on Roberts 
bearing Identification cards of Guy 
Butler of Union. When asked tt 
that was his named, he a ns were d 
that lt was. Upon investigation lt 
was revealed that Roberts had re- 
moved the wallet from Butler's 
room at the Kentucky Inn. 

Roberts sres wounded In the hip 
by Robert Houston, 28, bartender 
at Jack's Tavern, who was part- 
icipating in a search tor the alleg- 
ed robber. 

Butler's name was given to daily 
papers concerning the attempted 
holdup, bat was absolved of all 
blame after investigation. 



the humanitarian project by 

something extra to their contribu- 
tions to the Red Gross War Fund 
Drive to begin March 1. 



ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

L. W. Gulley purchased from & 
B. Arvin. the brick house and tot 
adjoining the store property of 
Galley and Pettit to Burlington, 
last week. 

Orin Edws 
farm near Big] 
this to D. F. Mitts and wife, of 

Mitts will operate this fans by a 
tenant this year. 



A B. Renaker. 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY U, INS 



nil BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



frgnyg cnuHTYREcnRnER 



A. E. STKFHEN8, 
RAYMOND CKM 



Rtttered at the Post Office, Burlmgeon, Ky„ as Beoond Claw HAH Matter 
rOBUSHED EVERY THURSDAY 



BEST ADVEKTlHmO MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 

ADVERTISING (INEpRMATION 

DMPLAY : X9c per axHum Inch. \ A 

JKJTMBS AND CARDS of THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 

words $1.00. 

6LASSD71ED ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
ward one cent each. All classified ads. payable in advance. 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 
ems; column depth, 21 Inches. Use mats or electros. 



Trapp the 10th and Jno Louden the 
10th. 

Mrs. Mellei Wlngate, Mrs. Mattle 
Hodges called on Mrs. B. W. Clore, 
Sunday. 



Mr. and Mrs. Oakley *T3B|bert, 
Mrs. Helen Buckler called on Elm- 
er Jar rell and wife, Sunday. 
, J. J. Scott and Gene Wlngate 
were in Eflanger Saturday. 



.$1.50 Per Year 



AMERICAN PRESS 

Far Over Fifty Y« 



RABBIT HASH 



V 



Quit 




f 



I 

i 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

BURLINGTON 95 

) ■ 
We pay 'phone charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 



luite a few- from here attended 
services at East Bend Church, last 
Sunday. * 

Mrs. Lou VanNess is not improv- 
ing very rapidly. 

J. W. Craig underwent an oper- 
ation last Wednesdoy. 

Several from here were shopping 
in Covington and Rising Sun, Sat- 
urday. 

Jimmie Jarrell and family visit- 
ed their mother, Mrs. Birdie Rect- 
or and son Paul, Saturday. 

Bruce E. JByle and family, J. J. 
Scott and children, of East Bend, 
visited their parents, S. B. Ryle and 
wife, of Rising Sun, Saturday. 

B. W. Clore was visiting H. M. 
Clore and family, of Lick Creek, 
Friday. 

Henry Black sold his farm last 
week to J. W. Craig. This farm is 
better known as the W. B. Stephens 
farm. Mr. Black will move to a 
farm near Union, soon. 

Mrs. Pauline Louden and hus- 
band recently entertained their 
daughter and husband. 

M/s. Wanetta WOods is now re- 
siding in Florence and is employed 
in Cincinnati. 

H. M. Clore will have* a sale this 
Saturday, February 17th. 

Wm. Delph and family moved to 
McVille, last Tuesday. 

Mrs. Edith Cunningham, of Ris- 
ing Sun spent Sunday at her place 
below town. 

Little Arlene Acra celebrated her 
6th birthday, Sunday, Feb. 11th. 
Others celebrating birthdays were 
Mrs. Martha Hodges the 12th, Lee 



\h 'if— iMl . \I ■ \n ■ ■ O-T^^a^^^^— 



REMEMBER WHEN 



—the chautauqua pitched tent each 
summer? It dispensed education and 
entertainment in easy doses for both 
young and old at convenient hours 
during the day and evening. That was 
before the movies captured America. 
Remember? 

. " • . ■ . . 



THANKS 

We want to take this opportuni- 
ty to thank the boys of the Walton, 
Ky. High School basketball team, 
also the boys of St. Henry basket- 
ball team, Erlanger, Ky., who so 
usly gave the entire proceeds 
'of their game last week at Walton 
to the Boone County Infantile 
Paralysis Fund. 

Mrs. Allen Gaines, Watton Chmn. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ooodridge Nestor, 

Director Boone Co. Infantile 

Paralysis Campaign. 



Three carloads of sweet potatoes 
were shipped in December by the 
Graves County Cooperative Mar- 
keting Association. 



RECORDER 1 YEAR $1.50 



MAN HAD BRICK IN HIS 
STOMACH FOR 10 YEARS 



One man recently stated that for 
10 years he felt like he had a brick 
in his stomach. This feeling was 
due to the lump of undigested food 
he always had inside of him. He 
was weak, worn out, headachy, 
swollen with gas and terribly con- 
stipated. Recently ,he started tak- 
ing ERB-HELP and Says the feel- 
ing like a brick in his stomach 
disappeared the second day. Bowels 
are regular now, gas and headaches 
are gone and he feels like a new 
man. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Heirbsj they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas^from stomach, act on sluggish 
ljver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. 



CATHERMAN 
FUNERAL HOME 

Tel CO 2580 Ludlow, Ky. 



'I' 



••'•a 



^;^>v 



WH'IW' ~ 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines v 

W. E. Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W. Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm* of J. W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. 

John O. Richards, Jr., farm, 
Florence, Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the 'above list for $1.00 each and 
will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGEY 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop; 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 up 

Cold Wave 

Permanent .... .$10.00 up 

Make appointments early. 

Operators: 

Margaret Brumback and 

Edythe Amburgey 



±iiitiiiiit tit 1 1 ii iiiiiii 1*1 1 1 ■ i in 1 1 1 iti ii ■■ iii 1 1 ii iiiiii iii ■ i in 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 it i ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 it 1 1 1 1 1 ij^ 

WASHERS REPAIRED 1 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

WM. HAGEDORN 

| 856 Dixie Highway ; .Erlanger, Ky. I 

=Tiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii it iniiiii ii ii 1 1 1 nit i mi itn ii ti iinii mi n i ■ 1 1 1 1 mi 1 1 it in ( n,,= 



iHininiiiiuiiuiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 




M CHAMBERS & GRUBBS OFFER .. . 





KENTUCKr* 




A! kadhff bread* U.S. 
Appromd. Blood-teated. I 



euuJu 



, ttarted eUeka one, two »no 
tm ntn old. rncti right. Mao Send chlcki. 
FREECATALOG.Write: KENTUCKY HATCHERY 
ItT WEST FOUBTH 8TBZH • LKXINUTON. JUOrrUCKT 



— 



BRING YOUR 









service which the older residents of EoSne County have 
own and respected for almost half a century^-and which 
newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. 



J Chambers & Grubbs 

\ FUNERAL DIRECTORS WALTON 852 H 

I utimaiWHiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii;.!! iiiniml 




chickens! 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 

For Full Price and Honest 

Weight 

.Phone: HEmlock 6135 

Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



G 



AYETV 

THEATRE I 



EELANGER, ELSMERE, KY 



FREE PARKING LOT 



TONIGHT — FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 15 AND 16TH 




EDNC BRACKEN Oil 



Also Selected Short Subj 
FEATURE STARTS: 7:1579:16 




SATURDA 



FEBRUARY 17TH 



THEJAST SIDE KIDS 




A MONOGRAM PICTURI 



Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. m. 

Cartoon, Comedy 
Chapter 12 "Flying Cadets" 

FEATURE STARTS 
2:49, 4:41, 6:33, 8:25, 10:17 



SUNDAY and MONDAY 

FEBRUARY 18TH AND 19TH 



I BUD A LOU 

ABBOTT LOSTEU.0 



In M-O-M'S 



tOSTfNA 
HAREM' 

WITH 

MARILYN MAXWELL 

JIMMY DORSEY &. 

-putt- 



Directed by 

CHARLES RIESNER 

Produced by 

GEORGE HAIGHT 



Sunday Continuous 2 to 11:30 p. 
News - Disney Cartoon 



m. 



FEATURE STARTS „ 

Sunday: 2:38, 4:39, 6:22, 8:10, 9:58 
Monday: 7:20, 9:26 



TUESDAY 



»„ 



FEBRUARY 20TH 
DOUBLE FEATURE 



STOLEN MASTERPIECE 
DRAWS FOUR 
TO DEATH...!' 




•aTQNI 

CONWAY 

Htm 



rro*, c .d by MAURICE GRAGHft 
gfcfjNj by WttltAM IBBCl 

— ■ m. 

and 



Trail Bldiere 



MAYNARD GIBSON 

-STEELE. 
^£ST^RDBOUH0 

A MOf<< IORAM PiMIIWF 



rf.-- *mja 



WED., and THURSDAY 
FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 21, 22 AND 23RD 



i\ 




= 



IMPROVED 

UNIFORM INTERNATIONAL 

SUNDAY I 
cmool Lesson 

Oi Tbe Moody Bible Inntltut* of cWagO, 
Heleaaed by Weetetn Newspaper Union. 

•^ ^ ^ — " 

Lesson for February 18 

t ee een subjects and Scripture texts se- 
lected «nd copyrighted by International 
Council of Bellgioua Education; used by 
permission. 

TREASURES OF THE KINGDOM 

LESSON TEXT— Matthew 13;4«-46; 14:13- 
H. 

GOLDEN TEXT— Every good gift and 
•very perfect gift Is from above, and com- 
eth down from the Father of lights, with 
whom la no variableness, neither shadow 
of turning.— James 1:17. 



Selected Short Subjects 



FEATURE STARTS 



7:12 and 9:17 



Hidden treasure!— there Is some- 
thing about it that catches our imag- 
inations and stirs our expectancy of 
discovering great riches. Men are 
constantly going on expeditions to 
seek out lost treasure. Others are 
engaged in study and research to 
bring out new treasures in nature 
or in tfie realm of learning or art. 
Why not stir up a little excite- 
ment about the unbelievably rich 
treasures which are hid in Christ 
and in the life of faith in Him? It 
is not hidden, except to the eye of 
unbelief, but it is greatly neglect 
and all but forgotten by many. 

The Scripture portions assigned 
for our lesson are not as well adapted 
to it as one could wish, but we may 
make good use of them. We learn 
here : » . 

I. The Cost of Redemption (13:44- 
46). 

Undoubtedly the lesson committee 
had in mind the usual interpretation 
of these parables, which i presents 
the sinner as the one. «eeking the 
treasure and giving up all that he 
may have Christ. 

While it is true that our redemp- 
tion is worth more than anything 
else in all the world and that the 
Christian would gladly set aside (or 
would he?) everything for Christ's 
sake, yet that does not fulfill the 
thought of this parable. After all, 
what has a sinner (whose own right- 
eousness is described in Scripture 
as "filthy rags") to sell in order to 
obtain redemption? And is it for 
sale? (See Eph. 2:8). 

Obviously, we here have the Sa- 
viour with His all-seeing eye and 
loving heart noting in fallen human- 
ity the pearl of great price, His own 
Church. He then gives up all the 
glory He had with the. Father, 
comes to the earth, and even be- 
comes sin for us that He may bring 
its to God. 

Salvation in Christ is no little 
thing, not something which was pur- 
chased with gold or silver, but with 
the precious blood of Christ. We 
ought to value it highly, and be- 
cause we are bought with such a 
price we ought always to glorify God 
(I Cor. 6:28). 

n. The Heart of Compassion (14: 
.13-16). 

The One who was willing to die. 
that men might have eternal life 
was not unmindful of their need of 
His mercy and grace for their 
daily problems. Jesus not only died 
that we might have redemption from 
sin, but He 'lived (yes, and lives 
now!) with tender-hearted com- 
passion toward those in need. 

He who is the living Bread was" 
not willing that men should hunger) 
for their daily bread: The disciples 
saw only one solution— to send them 
away, but Jesus said, "They need 
not depart." 

One is fearful that the church has 
been all too quick about sending the 
needy away to some social agency 
or community charity, when it 
should have won their confidence by 
its compassion, and then brought 
them to Christ. 

a. "Little is much when God is in it, 
and by the divine touch of Jesus the 
multitude was fed. Could we not 
do far more for Christ if we would 
only use the little we have, with. 
His blessing, for the help of our 
fellow meh? 

III. The Miracle of Provision (14: 
17-21). 

We pray, "Give us this day our 
daily bread," and it is only as God 
provides it that we have it. He gives 
life to the seed, and multiplies it 
in rich harvest, and we eat, we 
trust, with thankful hearts. 

That is a miracle — so oft repeated 
that we have lost a bit of the wonder 
and glory of it. Here in the story 
of the feeding of the five thousand 
and more (v. 21) with five loaves 
and two fishes, we have such a mira- 
cle of provision taking the little and 
making it enough for the multitude. 

The Lord may not work in exactly 
the same way today, but do not 
God's servants see Him multiply 
their meager storetoas they give it 
out in His name? That is true 
whether the gift be of material or 
spiritual things. God can and does 
bless those who trust Him. Letting 
what we have pass through the 
hands of Christ results in transfor- 
mation" and multiplication. Try it! 

Men and women are value-con- 
scious in our day. While money is 
plentiful, goods of real quality are 
scarce, and one must look for that 
which has durability and worth. The 
treasures which Christ offers are en- 
during. He says, "Lay up for your- 
selves treasures in heaven, where 
neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, 
and where thieves do not break 
through nor steal" (Matt. 6:20). 

By contrast, "the things Satan of- 
fers are temporary. In a few years 
most earthly honors and wealth 
must be laid aside. But the treas- 
ures of the kingdom are treasures 
which God intends that we should 
possei-3 forever. 



NORTH BEND ROAD 

The Sand Run R. A.'s, G. A.'s and 
Sunbeam Band will have their reg- 
ular meeting Saturday, January 17 
at 2:00 p. m. 

Wallace Blaker and wife were 
supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jake 
Blaker, Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wilson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Ryle and 
daughter spent Sunday with Mr, 
and Mrs. George Bggleston and 
daughters of Richwood. 

Vivian Cave spent Wednesday 
night with Betty Jean Ryle. 

Bro. and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton 



and family were In Crittenden 

Wednesday on business. 

, Mrs. Edgar Graves is on the sick 

list. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker enter- 
tained Sunday for Mr. and Mrs. 
William Blaker and family. 



SHEEP PAT CLUB BOY 

Frank. W. Paxton, an Adair coun- 
ty boy, last year raised 10 lambs 
from his five ewes and sold the 
lambs for $100. The ewes produc- 
ed 30 pounds of wool which sold 
for $12.50. After allowing for 
grain and hay, but not for pasture, 
Frank made a profit of $07. 



M A KC HOME REPAIRS HOW! 



(4\Jh K 



Quality 

Roofings 
Service 



?&'W&& 



m a 



AVAILABLE WITHOUT DELAY 

If you need roof repeire, or em entirely now roof, 
thara is no government regulation that willf delay 
Hi* work. We) have available ample stock of CAREY 
Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of prompt service 
•ad the) biggest roof value to be had anywhere. 
Call us, or come in about your roofing needs. We 
handle all details. No red taps.! 

•Buy WAR BONDS 
and STAMPS 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

tit CRESCENT AVENUE 

Erlanger -:- Kentucky 



*„.ur 



STANDARD FOR OVLR GO YLAR.«> 

ROOFING & SHINGLES 



CONTINUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Eiknger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER 




KENTUCKY 



We will be glad to explain our direct reduction 
Loan plan to you, which includes taxes and in- 
surance in monthly payments. 

INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



JNVEST to BACK OUR BOYS 
«v BUY WAR BONOS 
-We Issue Them 



BULUTTSVKXE CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 
Noble Lucas, Minister 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 a. m. Ben Kottrayer, Snpt. 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Tarda. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope you win eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES^ " £iSiJ£" & 

the first man you meet. 







|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin^ 
I FULL CREDIT I 



given on = 

I ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES J 

1 TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



= Phone ERL. 87 




Ambulance Service 



111 




A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP&STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE $ P^OISfE 

SERVICE * FLORENCE 13 



BUUUHBU 



■HUHBS 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BUtttWQTON. REWTPCEt 






— 



= 



McVILLE 



Tom Rogers has been in Cincin- 
nati in Deaconness Hospital since 
last Wednesday. He is reported 



convalescing nicely and will return 
home the first of the week. 

Mrs. Nellie Ryle entertained the 
Ladles' Aid of the Christian Church 
on Thursday. 

Seaman and Mrs. Cliff Stephens 



LINOLEUM 



TTT 



CHOICE OF 50 PATTERNS 



KITCHEN and LIVING ROOM RUGS 



•> 



Covington 
& Roofing Co. 



3RD AND SCOTT 



COVINGTON, KY. 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Many taxpayers ask "Why should I bother about tax re- 
turns, since my employer withholds my tax from my salary or 
wages?" The government may owe you a tax refund. 

There are three methods of determining which tax form 
is most economical for you to use. Don't guess which form suits 
you, consult one who knows. Reasonable fee. 



R. V. LENTS 



* NO. 1 LLOYD AVE 

Office Hours 6 to 9 p. m. 



FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 116 




and family and Mrs. Haael Wil- 
liamson and children called on 
Mrs. Vernon Scott, Monday even- 
ing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Wolfe were 
entertained Sunday at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Maurer at 
Burlington. 

John McMann, of Cincinnati 
spent the week-end with his rel- 
atives, Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Sutton. 

Eva Lou Walton spent Friday 
night and Saturday with Vera D. 

Raymond Stevens spent the 
week-end with his wife in Coving- 
ton. * — •' r — . — '—. 

Mary Lou Kelly has been ill the 

past week. 

Mrs. Vernon Scott and sons vis- 
ited her mother, Mrs. Anna Ryle 
at Rabbit Hash, Sunday. 

Several of the ladies from here 
attended the W. M. U. meeting at 
Mrs. McNeely's at Belleview, Wed- 
nesday. 

Mrs. Ashcraft, Mrs. Kruse, Stella, 
Pearl and Zora < Bcott spent Wed- 
nesday with Mrs. Grace Brown, 
helping with hog killing dinner. 

Mrs. Hazel Williamson spent the 
week-end with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Craig at Rabbit Hash. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ott Rogers called 
on Mrs. Tom Rogers and family on 
Sunday evening. 

Mr. Ashcraft and Rev. Smith 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Sut- 
ton, Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Harry Ashcraft and daugh- 
ters called on Mrs. Wm. Kruse, Fri- 
day afternoon. 

Mrs. Cliff Sutton and Mrs. Lizzie 
Smith were shopping in Covington, 
Sa,turdflv. 

Nellie Joe Purdy spent Sunday 
night with Mary E. Presser. 

The Ladies' Aid met at the home 



of Mrs. Rod Ryle, Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Delph and 
daughter moved to this communi- 
ty, Tuesday. 

Mrs. Walter Buckler and children 
spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Badger Buckler and children. 

Betty Jean Ryle spent the week- 
end with her sister, Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Clore, of Norwood, O. 

Cal Setters of the U. 8, Army vis- 
ited his sister, Mrs. Mabelj Abdon 
and children one day last week. 



Mr. and Mrs. Holbert Rue 
son of Norwood, Ohio, spent Sun 
day evening with his sister, Mr 
and Mrs. Leslie Shinkle. 

Wendell Louden spent Friday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Pete West and 



afld on 4 
Sun- Ihg. 



on Charles Shinkle, Sunday even- 



Mary C. Ashcraft called on Chas. 
Shinkle, Sunday evening. 



Harold Hodges was calling on 
Mr. and" Mrs. Wm. Delph and 

daughter, Sunday. 

Lewis E. Kelly spent the week- 
end with his aunt in Cincinnati. 

Mary Dolph and Wm. See called 



— 



fMXMXHXMXIIXKXHXIIXHXHXMXHrMXMXMXHXHXMXKXMXMXIIXMXMXMXI 

JOHN DEERE FARM MACHINERY 

• DELAVAL MILKING MACHINES 
DELAVAL CREAM SEPARATORS 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



w. 

sms, W. M. 
Piper, all at ■*•» count*, 
ed «0t» Jtf»» » t» of 
the 



Louden Dairy Barn Stalls-Stanchions 
Meyers Pumps and Water Systems 



HUDSON BROODERS and POULTRY 

EQUIPMENT 

Bring In Sheep Shearing Combs and Cutters 

To Be Sharpened 

FARM FENCING AND GATES 



The Jansen Hardware Co 



CO. 0910 



108-110 PIKE ST 



COVINGTON, K¥. 



Smxhxhxhxhxhi 



I 



fMXHXHXMXHXMXMXMXHXHXHXMXJ 

NEW and CLEAN 

Used Furniture 




MiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiii^ 

1 PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. j 

COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 

3 ..." - s 

| i 

Deposits Insured Under the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... 

7iiiiiiiiiiiHiiii»iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii<iiuiiiiuiiiiiiuiiiimiiimmnHg 



DIXIE DRY GOODS 

SAVE ON OUR^ 

FEBRUARY CLEARANCE 

SALE! 

* 

— - HERE ARE A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS 

ONE LOT OF MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS %\ M 
All colors and sizes. $1.98 value for 

MEN'S WORK SOX — • 15c 

CHILDREN'S PRINT DRESSES gQ^ 

Sizes 1 to 3 — 3 to 6 

LADIES' COTTON HOSE -25c 

LADIES' BEDROOM SLIPPERS ^c 

LADIES' RAYON HOSE 36c 

m SHEETS special $1.79 

40-INCH MUSLIN' 19 « 

12-FOOT AAA BLUEGRASS TOBACCO $Q.0O 
CANVAS I** 10 ° H* 

BUILT-UP SHOULDER SUPS 75C 

Reg. size 65c ....extra size ■ *^ 

LADIES' COTTON PRINT DRESSES 1.69 - 1.98 

DIXIE DRY COODS CO., INC. 

On The Highway - ERLANGER 



For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 
ERLANGER KENTUCKY 



| Madison Furniture 
i Store 

5 432-434 Madison Ave. 

■ Covington. -:- Kentucky 

SaHXWSHSKXMXMSeHJtHXHTI 





a 




t 



I 



I WILL OFFER FOR SALE TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, AT 
THE FARM OF LOUIS RYLE ON LICK CREEK, TWO MILES 
EAST OF RABBIT HASH ON UNION ROAD, 



SAT., FEB. 17 



AT 12 O'CLOCK (CWT) 

- * V ' 

\ 

The following property: Two good work horses; 2 fresh cows; 
1 thoroughbred red male hog, wt. 225 lbs.; 1 thoroughbred red 
sow, wt. 200 lbs.; 2 sets of work harness; collars, bridles and 
check lines; 1 road wagon; one 2-horse sled, good as new; mow- 
ing machine; hay rake; disc harrow; 1 Oliver breaking plow; 1 
hillside plow; 1 single shovel plow; 1 double shovel plow; one 
5-shovel plow; 1 iron International smoothing harrow, good as 
new; one-horse corn drill; pitchforks; post digger; wire stretch- 
er; 1 sledge hammer; 40 bushels of corn; some good alfalfa hay; 
1 scalding box, good as new; 1 lard kettle and other articles too 
numerous to mention. 

TERMS: CASH 






Having sold my farm, I wilHell at Auction 

to the highest bidderjat my farm located 

1 mile northwest of Burlington, on the 

Burlington-Idlewild road on 



Friday, Feb. 16 

Beginning at IS O'clock Sharp C. W.T. 



LIVESTOCK— Three milch cows, one will be 
fresh by day of sale; 3 heifers will be fresh soon; 
2 brood sows, will farrow soon; Z Duroc male 
hogs ; 18 head sheep; some chickens; 1 gray horse 
nine years old; l^sorrel horse five years old. 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS— 1 set double leather 
harness, collars, bridles and halters; 1 road wag- 
on, box bed, hay bed; mowing machine; nay 
rake; two-horse corn Ranter with fertilizer at- 
tachment; one 2-horee grain drill; 1 Oliver rid- 
ing turning plow; 1 disc harrow; one 60-tootn 



harrow; 3 double shovel plows; 
doubletrees and many other articles. A lot of this 
equipment is practically new. 
MISCELLANEOUS— Fifty bales of nice straw; 
some hay, loose or in bale. • 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Good heatrola 
3-piece bedroom suite; 2 bedsteads and 2 dress- 
ers; 1 library table; 1 davenett; some chairs; 1 
kitchen set, table and four chain; 1 oii stove. 4- 
burner; 1 bath tub and wash bowl; 2 feather 
beds; 1 DeLaval cream separator; 3 ruga. 



*. 



I 

i 



H.M. CLORE 



■TERMS : CASH 



A. G. McMULLEN, Owner 



REUBEN KIRTLEY, Auctioneer 



Kirtley and Bradford, Auctioneers 



mmSDAY, KBKUABY IS, IMi 



HOONC COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 




POULTRY EQUIPMENT and 
SUPPLIES 



■v 



OIL id* ELECTRIC 
BROODERS 



METAL FEEDS - WATER 
FOUNTAINS 

POULTRY REMEDIES 
FUL-0-PEP and DR. HEINZ 
' NU-WAY FEEDS 




T- LANG 



** 



512 Pike Covington, Ky 

1 

.HE. 9168 Open DaUy till 7 p.m. 






GASBURG 

• "1 

Wilson Leek, of Newport spent 
'Ttrtday night with Mr. and Mrs. E. 
i. Klopp and son. — 

Mrs. Charles White has been on 
the sick list. 

Misses Mary Bess and Shirley 
Burns spent Saturday evening 
with Misses Norma, Harriett and 
Betty Jarboe. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Thompson 
and daughter Mila, of Ohio, spent 



the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. H. 
W. Baker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kimberly 
were the Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Floyd Snyder. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son and (heir house guest, Wilson 
Leek, were shopping in Aurora, on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Arnold spent 
Saturday afternoon with Mrs. 
Elizabeth Keim, of Petersburg. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Rector and 



UBIKO FEEDS! 

GRASS SEEDS OF ALL KINDS - SOYBEANS 
ELECTRICAL WIRING 

' FLORENCE FEED & ELECTRIC STORE 

, t^ 

Florence 106 Raymond Gross, Prop. 



Lowest Cash Prices In Town 

ON MATTRESSES, FLOOR COVERINGS 

Mattresses, Floor Coverings, Stoves, Rugs, Furniture, Odd Pieces 

50 Lb. All -J'elt Mattress K $10.98 



Felt Daven- 
port Mattress 
$5.98 
50 Lb. 
Cotton 
Mattress 
$8.98 
27x36 
Jute Rugs 

69c 

Enamelware 

Dish Pans 

85c 



llllllllllllllll 
9x12 Linoleum 
'.. RUGS $3.98 * 

SPECIAL 

55 Lb. Pure White 

Felt Layer Mattress 

$14.98 



Felt Day Bed 
Mattress 

$8.98 

Baby Crib 

Mattress 

$3.98 

Rubberized 

Crib 

Mattress 

$6.98 
Linoleum 

Mats 
35c Each 



We have any size linoleum ru*s— Gold Seal & Armstrong Quaker 

J. A. BAUMGARTNER 

21 Pike St. and 24 W. 7th Covington, Ky. 



Next Door to Geo. W. Hill, Grocer 



IGEO.W.HILL&COJ 

ANOTHER BIG 

YEAR 




BIGGEST DEMAND FOR 
FOOD IN OUR HISTORY 
CHALLENGES EVERY 
FARMER . . . 



PLAN NOW 

Send for our 
complete list. 
Post card will 
do, with your 
name and ad- 
dress. 

Price List By 
yiteturn Mail 



DIXIE BRAND 



L, 




«^ 



best for field and garden 



Fresh, New Seed, tried and proven, high in 
germination and purity, best results as- 
sured. Modern laboratories of experienced 
seed analysts pat Hill's Dixie Brand Seeds 
through the acid test and put their stamp 
of approval on them. Make this year your 
most profitable! 

DR. SALISBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES AND 
DR. HESS PTZ POWDER AND PELLETS 




Since 1963 

ILL 



AMD 



COMPANY 



SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 

24-tt W. 25-29 PIKE 

SEVENTH ST. STREET 

COVIKG TON, KENT DC KY 



daughter spent Sunday afternoon 
with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp. 

Mr. nnd Mrs. *!!?n Burcham and 
sons spent Sunday with Mr. and 
Mrs. Ralph Cason and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas FfMds are 
the proud parents of a son born 
Thursday night. 

Mrs. Wm. Bradburn spent the 



week-end 'with"Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
White. 

Miss Emily Dell Sietonan does not 
improve very rapidly. _ " . '■ 

Mr. and Mrs..Shelton Stephens, 
of Norwood, spent Surfflay with 
Messrs James, Cleve and Miss 
Emma Aylor. 

Mr. and Mrs. Finley Biggley and 



baby are the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Couch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kittle and 
son, Of Lawrenceburg, Ind., and 
Mrs. Ira Kittle, of Idlewlld spent 
one day last week with Mrs. Lydla 
Abdon and family. 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 



TOBACCO SEED 

41A - 16 Warner's Golden Burley - Twist Bud 

Pratts N-K Worm Capsules 100 for 1.50 

Lee's Vapo Spray for Coughs, Wheezing, 

etc., .t-. bottle 50c, 1.00 

Lee's Perch Paint, vaporizes in coldest 

weather, can 85c - 1,50 

Hess Panamin, 5 lbs. 85c 10 lbs. 1.50 

Kow-Kare 60, $1.25 Bag Balm 60c 

^Old Settler - Clears up Black Water 
Chimney Sweep, Cleans soot etc., from 

stoves and furnaces, box 60c and 1.00 

Golden Blend Coffee, the best in our store lb. 30c 

GEO. C. 000DE 



The Binder boys from Illinois 
were visiting relatives in this sec- 
tion over the week-end. 

F. H. Sebree and wife entertain- 
ed Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Garland 
Huff and daughter, and Mr. and 
Mrs. H. E. Love. 

Bryant Jones called on Frank 
Sebree, Monday morning 



COVINGTON, 



KENTUCKY 



• 



Antique Collector 

Wants old kerosene lamps, furniture, dishes, col- 
ored glass, ornaments, ffuns, coins, music boxes. 

Best Prices Paid 

S. D. HEMPPLING 

Constance, Ky., or Box 110A, RFD 2 Ludlow, Ky. 



SHOP AT COPPIN'S 



SEETHE 
NEW SPRING 

FASHIONS 



COPPIN'S 

MADISON AT 7TH 
COVINGTON, .-:- KENTUCKY 



FRAMES 



and MOUNTINGS 



A picture is not really com- 
plete until it is properly 
mounted or* framed. Mount- 
ing not only protects the pic- 
ture but displays it to better 
advantage. 

You can get good frames at 
either of our studios^ at any 
time—tout right now the 
prices on some types of 
frames have been greatly re- 
duced. 

Should you have a picture 
or any other article that 
should be protected or dis- 
played to better advantage 
bring it to us for framing. 



STEVENS 
STUDIOS 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 






"Good Portraits" 



Baby Chicks 

PULLORUM TESTED 

Purina Feeds - Poultry, Hog, Dairy 

Metal Feeders and Fountains 

Electric Brooders ; Oil Drum Brooders 

Baied Straw Serval Litter 

25% Deposit on All Chicks Sent Parcel Post 

Orders placed now on chicks will assure you of 
early delivery 

Pollitt's Chick ® Feed Store 

215 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. 

Phone Dixie 7785 



SJIIIIHIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH ■IIIMMIIf lllllll IIIIJIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIL 

SAVE ON THESE VALUES 

I Just Received— New Shipment 

| CHINAWARE - GLASSWARE - POTTERY 



I 



7-Pc. Water Set 

Beautiful design, 8-oz. 
Pitcher and Six 10-Oz. 
Footed Tumblers AO«» 

$1.50 value. Set..^J{$|; 



-la. 



32-Pc. Breakfast Set 

Service for six. Solid col- 
ors—either yellow or green. 
$8.50 value. $/».95 

Set W\ 



6 TO 8-CUP COFFEE MAKER 

Drip style. Dunbar heat-resisting; glass. Guaranteed against 
breakage from heat. $1.75 value. Only 50 <*► $ 4 .39 



sell at 



each 



Visit Our Pyrex Counter 



PAT'S CHINA STORE 1 

Also Location GORDON SUPPLY CO. 
736 Madison Ave., Covington HE. 4988 1 

~1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 • I f 1 1 ( 1 1 . j ,(,, f f , = 



t 




WAYNE FEEDS! 

DAIRY — HOG — CHICKEN 

32% $3.35 EGG MASH IN $0.85 

24% 3.20 PRINT BAGS «f 

l°/» 2.85 Use mash, then make 

Topper 2.60 pretty dress from sack. 

40% Hog Supplement .:... $4.15 

35% Pig and Hog Supplement ...; 1.05 

Pig and Sow Meal 3.80 

Wayne Chick Starter 4.30 

Wayne Broiler Ration 4.15 

Wayne Grower 4.00 

Wayne Flushing Mash \ 5.75 

25 Lb. Bag Wayne Flushing Mash 1.55 

We handle a full line of WAYNE FEEDS 
We Also Handle all Raw Materials 

COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 



AUCTION 

., Feb. 24th 




AT 2:00 P.M. 

LOCATION— TWO SQUARES OFF U. S. 25 ON KENTABOO 
DRIVE AT THE HOME OI* THE LATE HATTIE LUCAS. WE 
HAVE LISTED WITH CpL. WORTHINGTON TO SELL THE 
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY : 



HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN FURNITURE— One Good Will 
coal range, in good condition; 1 four-burner oil stove; 1 kitchen 
cabinet; dishes and pans; 2 sets of silverware; 1 dresser-chif- 
fonier; 2 bed and springs; - Philco radio; bedding and linens; 
one lot of antiques; also about 2>/ 2 tons of coal; and many other 
articles too numerous to mention. 



Dixie 7720 - Dixie 7721 



Erlanger, Ky. 



Rosella 



Administrator 

Col. Worthington, Auctioneer 




3 



*i 



wmm 



MMMHMMi 



THE BOON! COUNTY BBCOBDCK, BUftUNOTON, KENTUCKY 



pifniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiitii»niifliiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii| 
Seen And Heard Around j 

The County Seat I 



lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIHIIIIII 

Mrs. Joe Walton, of Brlanger 
spent the week-end with her par- 
eaUtJUr. and Mrs. J. M. Eddins. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Easton vis- 

^Jed Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clore and 

ftonVShnday. 
I Mr. and Mrs. George Cook, of 
florence and Mr. and Mrs. Mark 
Cook, were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Sam Ryle and family. 
■\ Miss I*ucile Cotton spent Sunday 
night and Monday with her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Cotton, of 
Latonia. 



IIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllif 

Mrs. Susie Stephens spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hall 
and family, of Latonia. 

Miss Dean Stanley, of Lebanon, 
Ohio, has been Tisittag $er par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Charle* Kelly. 

Haxry Holtzclaw and two chil- 
dren Don and Lee, of Dayton, Ohio 
visited her father W. L. Cropper, 
last week-end. 

Mrs. Victor Reese, Walnut Hills, 
Cincinnati, spent Monday with 
her mother, Mrs. Levina Kirkpat- 
rick and family. < 



=C 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiMiiwuiiiiiiiiiS 

B. R. COOPER FARM 
Known as the Gran Butler, or Otis Bishop Farm 

S 333 1 /* AdRES 




i 




n 



JUST THINKING 



When you are ill you think of your "doctor, 
When you need groceries you think of your grocer, 
When you need legal advice you think og your lawyer, 
When you want to know the news you think of your newspaper, 
When you have money or need money we like to have you think 
of this bank. _J; 

WE ARE AS MUCH INTERESTED IN YOUR SUCCESS 
AS WE ARE IN THE SUCCESS OF OUR OWN BUSINESS. 
MAY WE HELP YOU? 



Peoples Deposit Bank 



M 

I 
■ 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY gg 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation x 

Capital $50,000.00 . Surplus $150,000.00 m 

IH «HXH«HIHXHXHXM»H«H«HXHIH»HXH«H«H«HXHXHXHXHXHg»l«H» 



wmmmmm^M^^^^ 



*T«* 




AT AUCTION 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17TH— 10 A. M. 
Mt. Zion, Ky. 
Also 44 Head of Cattle and some Farming Equip- 
ment, Work Stock, Etc.. 

a hi/ Is an deal farm for an investment or a home. It lies back 
a little bit and is an extra .good farm. 250 acres of this farm you 
will find is as good a land as you ..*rill find in an average good 
farm. Plenty of black locust land, alfalfa land, grows extra good 
tobacco. A large portion in blue grass, 25 acres in alfalfa, 8 acres 
tobacco base, plenty of good water and wood, improved with a 
nice 2 story 8-room frame, tenant house, 1 extra large tobacco 
barn, 2 other feed and stock barns, and all necessary outbuild- 
ings. 

Mr. Gran Butler, the former owner of this farm, lived and oper- 
ated this farm for years, and was one of the community's most 
successful farmers, and the farm has been, well taken care of. 
LIVESTOCK— 47 head, 9 Jersey milch cows, age 3 years and up, 
2 with calves by side, 13 Angus and Hereford 2-year-old heifers, : 
will freshen soon, 7 cows, beef type, will freshen second time soon, ; 
10 heifer calves, 3 male calves, 1 registered Angus bull. 
HORSES — 3 two-year-olds, heavy work stock. ' = 

TOOLS — 1 Joerger concrete mixer on rubber, 1 binder, 1 power 3 
wood saw, other small tools too numerous to mention. 
On account of trie man power shortage, Mr. Cooper's business 
In town requires all of his time, and does not leave him time to : 
devote to his farm, as he would like, as he and Mrs. Cooper have 1 
signed a contract with us to sell the above farm for the high 
dollar bid. - 

Here is your chance to buy a farm at a reasonable price, that - 
will make you large returns on your investment. One of the — " 
safest places to invest your money is in "Old Mother Earth." = 

8 WE EXPECT TO SELL 68 ACRES THAT ADJOIN THIS ABOVE I 
5 FARM AND BELONGING TO THE ABERNATHY HEIRS AT THE I 
SAME TIME AND PLACE. As this advertising was going to press I 
we had not received word from all of the heirs, but expect to = 
by the day of sale. 

FREE KENTUCKY BURGOO FREE = 

(Tom Cody's Recipe) Everybody Invited I 

TERMS MADE KNOWN ON DAY OF SALE. CAN FINANCE. I 

HOW TO GO TO SALE I 

Follow Dixie Highway No. 25 to Sherman, Ky., from Sherman I 
to Mt. Zion, from Mt. Zion about five miles to farm. 

R. M. LUCAS & CO. BESSIE HALEY 

Auctioneers Broker 

115 W. 3rd St., Cincinnati, O. 322 Dixie Highway, Erlanger = 

CH. 8537-4330 Dixie 7346 = 

IF YOU HAVE ANYTHING TO SELL, SEE US. I 
OUR TERRITORY— U. S. A. and CANADA 

_l(iiiiiiiiiffliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiinT 



Miss Ann Fulton, of Cincinnati,! Larry Allen Mfrree, *» «tf Ux \ **• aad Mm - Mmrl 
spent the week-end with Miss and Mrs. Onrffle Setoree tpf been lObflngtou were 
WilmaAtha. I quite ill for the past few days. iMr. and Mrs. J. G. BrnML 

^ 



B = 



II 



r / 



Women in Service Work 
Applaud these Styles! 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like for your 
hours on duty . . . feminine and flattering for your gala even- 
ings! Get your go-everywhere hairstyle today! 

A LaRose Permanent will make it last and last 



RESTYLING-CUT, SHAMPOO-SET 



.$2.00 



LaRose Beauty Salon 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Collins, Prop. 



JUST ARRIVED 



Just arrived two cars heavy field fence No. 9 top and bot- 
tom a'nd 11 filler, also NoT9 48-inch high and barb wire. 

Large shipment 5-V galvanized roofing; 2-horse riding 
cultivators and mowing machines on hand. Steel is scarce don't 
wait too long. 

Large supply ground government wheat, salt; oyster shells 
and a full line of other feeds. 

Bi-County Co-Op. Farm Bureau Association 

W. W. WOODWARD, Manager DEVON, KENTUCKY 



ACCORDIONS 

WANTED 



CASH PAID 

HANSER MUSIC CO. 

540Madisorf * Covington HE. 7413 



The Home Store 

IIIIIIIIUIIItlllllHIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIUIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIHMIIIIIIIIMIMMIMI 

ORDER YOUR REQUD1EMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL 

FERTILIZER NOW! 

WE WILL HAVE OUR NEW CROP GRASS SEED ABOUT FEB- 

1— BOOK TOUR ORDER NOW! 

• ■ 

■ i " ' | . 

TOBACCO SEEDS1 

.. • 
STAFFORD'S SPECIAL ORIGINAL LONG LEAF 

GOLDEN BURLEY 1 «. $1.50 

BELL'S BOURBON WHITE BURLEY, a smoker from 

bottom to top; root-rot resistant tobacco seed 1 «w. $1.50 

NO. 18. WHTTE BURLEY CERTIFIED SEED 1 oi. $1.50 

WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY 1 ob. $1.50 

NO. S3 WHITE BURLEY WILT RESISTANT SEED oz. $1.50 

PENETRO COLD SALVE . . .-.-. .....:. .25c and 60c 

ST. JOSEPH COD LIVER OIL pt. $1.00 

PENETRO NOSE DROPS .25c and 50c 

PENORUB FOR COLDS ..". 35c 

LANDFORD COUGH MEDICINE .; 25c 

PENETRO BABY COUGH DROPS 25c 

LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC ...* 25c 

FLETCHER'S CASTORIA 35c 

ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN 10c, 20c and 35c 

ALKA SELTZER ...j. $0c and 60c 

BROMO SELTZER -, 30c 

LANDFORD COLD TABLETS 10c 

PENETRO QUININE TABLETS FOR COLD fZ&c 

GROVES' COLD TABLETS . ...'...... - 25c 

STANBACK HEADACHE POWDERS, 6 dozes pkg. 10c 

.FEEN-A-MINTS 16 tablets 25c 

CARTER'S LITTLE LIVER PILLS 25c 

ANACIN TABLETS, Relieves Pain , box 25c 

.SAFETY KIT, With gauze dispenser ..15c 

JVICK'S SALVE . 30c 

PENETRO INHALER for head colli 25c 

RUBBING ALCOHOL ' > pt. 30c 



GUUEY & PETTIT 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



WELDING! 

ACETYLENE and ELECTRIC 

PORTABLE 



Have Your Welding Done At Home 

Prompt Service . —-.... Reliable Work 

». S. L-tli li p^, 



No job too 



>r too small 



R. B. TAYLOR 

PHONE FLOR. 1493-J - DIXIE 7454-M 
FLORENCE, ~T -:- KENTUCKY 



Used Cars 

- 

Many are guaranteed! 

'36 INTERNATIONAL PICK-UP, guar. 345.00 

'36 CHEV. Vz TON PANEL TRUCK 255.00 

1936 TERRAPLANE 4-DOOR 200.00 

'34 CHVERQLET COACH 175.00 

'40 DODGE TUDOR ! 963.00 

'37 BUICK SEDAN .;..: 560.00 

'36 DODGE COUPE :. 350.00 

'34 NASH SEDAN 150.00 

'37 TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

'39 HUDSON COACH 695.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



PUBLIC 



WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC- AUCTION ON THE LUTE 

MILES FROM FLORENCE, ON 



ROUTE 42, 



Ov 



At 11:00 (CWT) 

THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: 
LIVE STOCK— 9 good milch cows, 2 with calves by side, one 
fresh by day of sale, 6 milking now; two coming 2ryear-old 
horses; 2 coming 3-year-old horses; 1 aged mule, work anywhere 
single line. 

FARM EQUIPMENT— 1 farm wagon; hay bed; turning plow; 
. also other plows; 1 extension ladder, 30-ft. long, good as new; 
tractor on good rubber; set cultivating tractor plows; two 14- 
inch cut tractor plow; tractor disc; good Rastus plow; new 2- 
horse corn planter with fertilizer attachment; one 2-horse sled; 
10 cow chains; milk cart; two 10-gallon milk cans; three 5-gal- 
lon cream cans and milk strainer; pitchforks; jsingletrees and 
doubletrees; posthole digger; hoes; shovel, log chains; double 
set harness; collars and two steel barrels. 

MISCELLANEOUS— Two Estate heatrolas, one large size, one 
medium size; °ne porcelain coal and wood range in good condi- 
tion; 2 kitchen tables; 4 kitchen chairs; 100-pound ice box with 
porcelain inside; 50-pound ice box; tabletop porcelain gasoline 
stove, good as new; Simplex brooder stove, 500-chick size. 

LUNCH SERVED BY FLORENCE HOMEMAKERS 

TERMS: CASH 



&> 



COL. WORTHINGTON, Auctioneer 









PUBLIC 







I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON MY FARM LO- 
CATED AT LIMABURG, UP CREEK ROAD, KNOWN AS THE 
JOHN AYLOR FARM, ON 







23RD 



BEGINNING AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON JCWT) 

FARM IMPLEMENTS— 1 Box bed wagon; 1 hay bed; 1 mow- 
ing machine; one 60-tooth smooth harrow; 1 International cult- 
ivator; 1 John Deere turning plow; 1 Scotch Clipper turning 
plow; 1 wheat drill; 1 Gayle 3-horse turning plow; 1 double 
shovel plow; 1 Syracuse hillside plow; 1 small jumper plow; 1 
log chain ; 1 crosscut saw ; 1 wagon jack; % long handle hay forks 
3 manure forks; 1 corn scoop; 1 set leather tug work harness; 
lot of odd size collars; 1 set doubletrees and singletrees, odd 
singletrees. 

LIVE STOCK— One team dapple gray work horses; 4 young 
Jersey cows, 3 will freshen by March 20; 2 heifers; 1 male hog. 

HOUSEHOLD.. FURNITURE— 1 good piano; 1 living room • 
suite; one 8-ft. round dining table; 1 solid oak center table; 3 
rockers; lots of straight chairs; 2 metal bedsteads and springs; 
3 feather bids; 1 settee; 2 chest of drawers; 1 wash stand; one 
12x12 Axminister rug; three 12x12 good congeloum rugs; ;one 
17x14 red velvet rug; one 9x12 Axminister rug; new coal heater; 
1 Estate heatrola; 2 card tables; 1 lard press; 1 sausage mill; 2 
milk pails; all kinds of dishes and some cooking utensils and 
miscellaneous articles too numerous to mention. , 

*• TERMS OF SALE— CASH 

. J. OGDEN, OWNER 

COL LUlt SHAurunu, Auununttn 



r* 



swwes 



1 



II 



THURSDAY, FfcBRUARY II, lMi 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



HEBRON 

Mr. and lira, Mart Kennedy, Jr., 
«re parents of a little son born, a 
tmr weeks ago. 

Seaman Second Class, Harry Lee 
Aylor returned to Great Lakes 
■aval Training Station Friday, 
after a nine-day furlough. 

Wm. Crlgler and the Infant son 
Of Mr. and Mrs. John crrigier nas 
been 111. 

Ben Paddack is on the sick list. 

.Mrs. C. T. Tanner, Mrs. Frank 
Aylor, Mrs. Wm. Waters and Mrs. 
Ed Baker attended the funeral ser- 



vices for Mrs. Harriet Utz, Satur- 
day afternoon at the Taliaferro 
funeral home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Fogle and 
family, of Crittenden were the 
week-end guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leo Jarmen and daughters. 

Seaman Harold Utz, of Great 
Lakes was called here on account 
of the death of his aunt, Harriet 
Utz. Aw 

Mrs. Wilbur Shinkle, of Hooven, 
Ohio, was the week-end guest of 
relatives here. 

Mrs. Lee Marshall, of Bullittsville 
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. M. 



M. Oarnett and Mr. and Mrs. B. K. 

Stephens. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tanner and 
sons and Ronnie Oarnett were the 
Sunday " guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Easton and Mr. and Mrs. 
Arnold Easton, of Price Pike. 

Mrs Viola Hlckey, of Covington 
spent Saturday afternoon with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Craves. 

Mrs. Bessie Enist returned home 
Friday from Hyde Park, where she 
spent several weeks with her son 
Raymond and family. 

The Missionary Society of the 
Lutheran Church will meet at "the 



3E 



DO OUR FEET BOTHER YOU, ~ 

FOOT SUFFERERS? 

Why Hobble about when you can be spry and happy? Bring your burden 
of foot troubles to us where thousands have been helped. You get expert 
advice, a series Of electric manipulations and hand massages and you only 
pay for your prescription shoes, THAT'S ALL! 



church Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 
21. Mrs. Emmett Riddell will be 
the leader. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Avery and 
daughter, of Erlanger and Mrs. 
Berry, of Taylorsport, spent Sun- 
day with Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 
Goodrldge and daughter. 

Miss Ruth Stevens, of Newport 
and Miss Dorothy Watts were the 
week-end guests of Mrs. Hallie 
Herbstreit and son. 

Mrs. Hallie Herbstreit was the 
guest of Mrs. Ruth Cloud and Mrs. 
Chris Whitaker last Thursday. 

Mrs. Mamie Bullock and Miss 
Jessie Gordon called on Mrs. H. L. 
McGlasson on Sunday afternoon. 

Mrs. Russell Kittle spent Thurs- 
day with Mrs. Mary Utz. 

Friends of Mrs. Rose Crlgler are 
glad to know she is able to leave 
the hospital and is at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Anderson, 
of Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs" Bernard Wilson 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. A. 
B. Ligon, of Bullittsville. . 

Harold Utz returned home Friday 
night from Great Lakes Naval 
Training Station to attend the fu- 



FREE 

Electric Oscilating 
Treatments 



N.TULCH 

FOOT COMFORT 
SPECIALIST 

Associates — D. E. Witzleben 
C. Kenenth Kruse 




FREE 

Foot analysis. Get to 
the bottom of your 
Foot Troubles. 



PEOPLE'S 

SHOE STORE 

"Where Foot Comfort Begins" 

814-816 Madison Ave. 
Covington, Ky. 




Clear vision, no head- 
aches or nervous attains 
. . . the boy that sees 
well LEARNS WELL. 



D R.J. O.TYSON 

Of F ICC AT 

MOTCH 

THC JC WC L€RS 

61315 MADISON BV.COVIMGTOM 

SINC€ /BS7 





sold my farm I will offer at Public Auction 
at my farm on Route 20, at Bullittsville, 

Kentucky, on 



>■» • 



Sale to begin at 10:00 A. M. 



LIVESTOCK— 3 horses, two aged 7 years, 1 age 
9, all good workers; 10 cows, three with calves 
and others to fresh in spring; 14 shoats, hogs. 



FARMING TOOLS— Road wagon with box bed 
and sideboards; hay frame; manure spreader; 2- 
horse sled; tedder; new hay rake; new mowing 
machine; 50-tooth harrow; new corn planter; 
practically new disc harrow ; riding plow, all used 
two years; corn crusher with new belt; electric 
milk washer, 6-10 gal. cans strainer; 5-tooth cult- 
ivator; smoothing and hinged harrow; pitchforks 
singletrees, doubletrees, posthole digger and 
shovel; iron wheelbarrow; several large boxes; 
extension ladder; roll of roofing; 2 iron kettles 
with spider; stack hay; 8 or 10 tons hay in barn; 
40 shocks fodders; 10 cow chains; crosscut saw; 



harness, bridles, collars; 1 breaking plow; double 
shovel plow; side saddle; one 14" John Deere 
breaking plow; and other things too numerous 
to mention. ^ 

HOUSEHOLD Fl/RNITURE— Three-piece liv- 
ing room suite; dining room suite, consisting of 
12-foot round table, 10 leather bottom chairs, 
sideboard, sold as whole or separate; square 
table and six chairs; chifforobe; dresser; look- 
ing glass; coal vase; 10 or 12 chairs; lot of bed 
clothes including three good feather beds; lot of 
dishes; graniteware; Southbend cooking stove; 5- 
burner builtin oven coal oil stove; kitchen cab- 
inet; glass safe; folding bed; several tables; cot; 
one iron bed; 1 half bed and walnut bed; 2 rugs, 
one good 9x12, one 10x12 ft. rug; one small rug. 

a 2Q » 



Terms Cash 



Lunch Served in Basement 






AUCT: C. L. LANCASTER 



neral of his aunt, Mrs. Harriet Utz. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Siekman and 
family called on Mr. and Mrs. How- 
ard Acra Friday evening. 

Mrs. Stanley Graves spent Tues- 
day afternoon with Mrs. Frank 
Aylor. 

Miss Jessie Gordon spent Tues- 




SMNXMMXKXMHZHMl 



Da bundys ,, 

Winter prodi* 1 - 



OHECrJKTrlAT 

.C«tocoaterTqp<L 



BUNOY THOMAS 



day with Mrs. Mamie Bullock and 
family. 

Mrs. Emmett Kilgour spent Mon- 
day with Mrs. George Moore. 

Henry Crlgler was removed from 
his home last week to the Veterans 
Hospital, Dayton, Ohio. . 



Want Ad--They Sell 



BROTHERHOOD DINNER 

The annual Brotherhood dinner 
will be held at the Bullittsville 
Christian Church on Wednesday, 
February 31st at 7 p. m. 



Mrs. C. R. Johnson of Simpson 
county, who has bean a leader in 
her homemakers' club for IB years, 
was awarded a pin and certificate. 



The leader since 1S40. 

For use over wallpaper, 
calcimine or most any Inside 
surface. An oil base. 






fZHXHXMZMXHXMXMXMJ 



MARCH 15th— 

The Last Day For Filing Tour 

1944 INCOME TAX 
RETURN 

Avoid The Last Minute Rush 

For prompt and effective 
compliance with the New Tax 
Law, consult — 

ISRAEL AR0N 

Accountant and Auditor 

32 E. 7th St. Covington, Ky. 
BX 2718 



Mar-Lu Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining luster. , We also 
specialize in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 



mm 



Your 
Eyes 

Are You Irritable — Nervous? 
Perhaps your eyes are the 
cause. An examination may 
reveal it. 

Jos. B. Schnippering 

Optometrist and Optician 

5 Pike Street, Covington 

Phone HEmlock 0700 



1 1 T 1 1 II 1 1 1 llll 11 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 I1II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IX 1 1 1 1 II I It 1 1 

I New James 

Theatre 

NEW SHOW TIME 

One Show Each Night at 7:30 CWT 

Sunday Matinee at 2:30 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday & Thurs. 



William Boyd, Andy Clyde, in 

MYSTERY MAN 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15 



Jeanne Craine, Frank Latimore, 
and Eugette Pallette, in 

IN THE MEANTIME, 
DARLING 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 16 and 17 



Benny Goodman, Linda Darnell, 
Lynn Bar! in 

SWEET AND LOW-DOWN 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18TH 



Kay Kyser, Ann Miller, Victor 
Moore in 

CAROLINA BLUES 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH 



NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY Z0TH 



Benny Fields, Gladys George and 
Al^n I>ln chart, In 

MINSTREL MAN. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21ST 
|i<!l!Hlfiilll!!!l!in?IMIMII!UlMll(l!IMUII|l 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 
FREE CHECKING 



R. Michels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St. Covington, Ky. 



BLANKET 

SALE! 

72x84 Double Blanket, 25% Wool $C.98 

by Nashua. Wide Satin binding ** 

72x84 SINGLE BLANKET $0.98 

25 Percent Wool ^ 

TOBACCO COTTON 9 Feet wide $£.98 

100 Feet Long ** 

REG. $3.98 SKIRTS, pleated $2.98 

100 Percent Wool Slipover Sweaters $3.98 

CHILDREN'S SNO SUITS AT »/ 2 PRICE 

You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," - 
"Poll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The House of Quality"— Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



a . :»«■ 



Buy Your Hardware Early! 

. 

IT IS SCARCE... 



Jamesway 500-Chick Elec. Hovers $39.95 

Oakes 300-Chick Elec. Hovers 29.95 

James wfy 500-Chick Oil Brooders 25.00 

All size chick feeders and fountains 

Flock Feeders, on legs 4.75 

Flock Heated Waterers on stand 8.50 

Electric Units to build brooders 6.95 

Electric Water Heaters for Fountains 3.95 

Water Fountains for Barrels 2.95, 

^«_ »* ' ; ■ — " ". a . . ■ ;' ■ . ' V — — 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Tonic 

PTZ Capsules and Powder for Worms 

Hog Lye for Feeding Purpose 

5 and 10-Gallon Milk Cans 

Single Wire Stretchers 2.50 

Seed Sowers (Cyclone) ......... 2.75 

Plenty of saws, axes, grub hoes, mattocks, picks 
% iron wedges, posthole diggers and 
handles of all kinds. 

a ■ 

Large Selection of Harness 

PLANT BED FERTILIZER BY THE BAG 

NITRATE OF SODA BY THE POUND OR BAG 

OLIVER AND VULCAN CHILLED PLOWS 

Most all repairs for both 

GARDEN/PLOWS - 3-SHOVEL CULTIVATORS 

SLED SOLES and BAR IRON 

GALVANIZED WATER PIPE and FITTINGS 
ELECTRIC WHtlNG MATERIAL 
ELECTRIC FENCE CHARGERS 

WIRE FENCE and BARB WIRE 

Linoleum Rugs and Linoleum by Yard 

30-Gallon Range Boilers 

Coal Water Heaters 

Grate Baskets 20" and 24" \ 
^ Electric Tool Grinders * , 

Large assortment of belts, pulleys and grinding 

* wheels. 

CONRAD HARDWARE 

PHONE 23 *_ WALTON, KY. 



■M^i^ 



■ 



THE BOON* COUNTY 



BUBLWGTON, 



n\ L 



BELLEVIBW 

Mrs. Russell Rogers and daughter 
and Mrs. John Maurer were shop- 
ping In Covington, Friday. 

Mr. and - Mrs. Robert Rogers, Mr. 



and Mrs. Allen Roger* and daugh- 
ter Wllla Deck and Charles~Shinkle 
called on Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ash- 
craft and daughters, Thursday 
evening. { 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brown and 




1ET US EXAMINE YOUR EYES THE MODERN WAV 



LJ.METZCER 



OPTOMETRIST - 
631 Afaci/SOM Ave . 



■ 



- OPTICIAN 
Covington, H\ 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 . \ PHONE 762 

ARLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



daughter were shopping in town 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Chrlstena Klrtley is staying 
with Mrs. Sam Ryle, of Burlington. 

Mrs. Jess Bagby and children of 
Waterloo, spent Tuesday night 
with her parents, Mr., and Mrs. 
Stanley Stephens and family. 

Several from here attended the 
ball game at Burlington, Friday 
night. 

The Missionary meeting at the 
Baptist Church was held at the 
home of Mrs. C. B. McNeely, Wed- 
nesday. __^ 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. McNeely spent 
the week-end with their son James 
L. McNeely and family, of Maderla, 

Ohio. , 

Mrs. Lizzie Smith, Mrs. Bertha 
Sutton and Mrs. Alice Aylor were 
in Covington, Saturday. • 

Mrs. Bud Scheben and daughter 
'of Erlanger spent Sunday with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sherman 
Burehftni f 

Miss Evelyn Rogers spent Satur- 
day with Betty Rogers. '* 

Bro. and Mrs. Edwin Smitrrand 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Allen Rog- 
ers and daughter spent Sunday 
with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ajhcraft 
and daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rogers Jr., 
and daughter were Sunday guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rogers, Sr., 
and family. 




vTLLE 



Raymond Earl Mattoz spent 
Wednesday night with his grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Theo Birkle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sullivan and 
daughter Carolyn called on Mr. 
and Mrs. A. B. Ligon and son on 
Tuesday evening. Miss Frances 
Wilson and Henry Mlkkelson also 
were callers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Tipton 
called on Mrs. Hubert Ligon and 
son Billy Ray Tuesday afternoon.- 

Mrs. Alberto Stevens has had a 
well drilled at her place recently. 

Misses Mary Frances Bondurant 
and Shirley Mlkkelson spent the 
week-end In Indiana, visiting Miss 
Bondurant's parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson and 
daughters Bonnie and Sandy were 



PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed $2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.20 

32% Dairy Supplement 3.25 

Big V Laying Mash 3.40 

40% Hog Supplement 3.75 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Rations 3.35 

55% Meat Scrap 4.35 

41% Soybean Meal 3.05 

Ground Wheat 2.90 

Wheat Middlings 2.75 

Wheat Bran 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal 2.85 

Hominy Meal v •—• 2.85 

Poultry Scratch . 3.20 

24% Brewery Grain 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet 3.30 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt 1*25 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells ~ 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



More than nine-tenths of the 
400 frozen food lockers in Mont- 
gomery county are rented by farm- 
ers. 



DUTCH STANDARD 

4-Hr. Enamel, 18 colors. White for 

furniture, woodwork AF» : 

floors & walls. $1.25 vaL^J^qt. 



Thursday evening guests of Mr 
and Mrs. A. B. Ligon and son. 

Mrs. John Sebastian and son 
Douglas are visiting her sister, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Hawkins in Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Clifford 
and son were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Fred Reitmann and 
daughters. 

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hubert Ligon and son Billy Ray 
were Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 
and daughters and Mr. and Mrs. 
Leonard Tipton. 

Mrs. John Whitaker and Mr. and 
Mrs. Alvln Earl Whitaker and 
daughter Sue, were visiting Miss 
Irene Green, Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Ligon and son 
Jack entertained for Mr. and Mrs. 
Marvin Ligon and daughter Janice 
Rhea, of Belleview, Rev. and Mrs. 
W. T. Gardner called in the aver- 




Quick- Dry Enamel 



.$1.98 gallon 



Aluminum Paint- 
Heat resisting. $4.95 val. 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 



noon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Ligon attend- 
ed a show at the Albee Theater in 
Cincinnati, Saturday eyening. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



TAKE CARE OF THE THINGS YOU HAVE 



*> 



LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 

COVINGTON 

BREAKFAST - .LUNCHEON 

DINNER 

6 A. M. to 8:00 P. M. 
AIR CONDITIONED 




Tossing brickbats and bouquets, 
he illustrates Times editorials 



EDWIN A. FINCH . . The Louisville Times* editorial illustrator and 
cartoonist sees the fanny side of even the most serious jditorials, and 
helps yon get the point with a few deft brash strokes. Born in a suburb 
of Cincinnati, Ed swept into Louisville just ahead of the flood in 1937 
and soon after found himself high and dry when the promotion scheme 
he had undertaken failed completely. That's when he joined the news- 
papers, where he soon reached peak popularity with his Roto comic 
»trip character "Ser^o-mt Cinch.' » 

As America armed for World War II, Finch, who had been a sergeant 
with Company D, 330 Infantry, in World War I, put bis proxy into 
the thick of rookie training, via the comic strip, and himself spent many 
a rough week-end at Fort Knox and Bowman Field sketching comic 
situations on the hoof. Using actual names, the "Sergeant Cinch" car- 
toons appealed to old vets and new rookies alike. * 

The man who signs bis daily cartoons simply "Finch" is a finely 
drawn, handsome gentleman with a prematurely white crest of hair. 
At home he has six charming young Finches, ranging in age from a 
nine-month-old baby to a glamorous sixteen-year-old deb. 



\ 



« 



Follow Finch while he illustrates 
important editorial points daily in 



The Louisville Times 




W. E. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 

correction and 

protection of 

EYESIGHT 



27 E. 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KT. 

iHours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 



Evenings by appointment 

Phone HE. 2088 



Tightening of civilian production controls means you'll probably 
to wait longer for those new electric appliances you want. So don't 
neglect your present equipment. Give k the continued good care it 
needs to make it last. 

Follow These Tips on Appliance Care 

e Oil motors regularly according to 
manufacturers' directions. (Some mo- 
tors are enclosed in hermetically sealed 
units and need no oiling.) 

e Keep appliances doom. Wipe care- 
fully after each using. Dirt, dust, food, 
crumbs, can cause trouble. 

e Tighten nuts, bolts and screws at the 

first sign of looseness. 






-1 



* Watch out for loose connections. If 

appliance sparks or motor stalls, dis- 
connect instantly and have checked. 



e Ntnrur immerse an appliance la wa- 
ter. It may result in a short circuit, 
damaged appliance or both. 

• Don't drop appliances and don't knock 
'diem around. Treat them with care. 

r 

o Don't tinker. Unless yon know ex- 
actly what you're doing, have an -ex- 
pert serviceman handle your repairs. 

■e 

e Treat cords carefully. Don't kink, 
knot or allow to rub on sharp edges. 
Keep away from oil, moisture, hot ap- 
pliances. Don't yank to disconnect. 






i 



•A - 



Ask Us for Suggestions on the Care and Use of 
Specific Appliances 

COMMUNITY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY 



, —- 



- 



BUG SALE 

I will offer at Public Auction on the Mary Berk- 
shire farm, located on Woolper Pike, just 

off State Road 20, on 



FEBRUARY 



At 12:00 [CWT] 

THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED PROPERTY: 



LIVESTOCK —1 cow, Jersey and Shorthorn, to 
freshen in April; 1 Jersey and Shorthorn, fresh- 
en in May; 1 black Jersey milking* now; 1 Jersey 
cow with calf by side; 1 Shorthorn Brown Swiss 
heifer, freshen in spring; 1 heifer, six months 
old; 1 team 5-year-old horses, work anywhere; 
one 9-year-old bay mare; 1 black horse; 1 black 
mare 5 years old. / \ 

FARM EQUIPMENT— 1 jumping shovel plow; 
one 5-shovel cultivator; one 14-inch Syracuse 
turning plow; 1 Rastus plow; one 60-tooth har- 



row; 1 David Bradley disc harrw; 1 Internation- 
al cultivator; 1 David Bradley 2-horse corn plant- 
er; 1 Model A Ford tractor on rubber; one 2- 
horse sled, same as new; 1 mowing machine; 1 
double set work harness; 4 horse collars; 4 halt- 
ers and bridles and check lines; 1 lot double trees 
and singltrees; 1 man saw. 

MISCELLANEOUS— 1 wood heater; 1 coal heat- 
er, heatrola type, good as new; 3 young turkey 
hens; 1 lot timothy hay, and many other 
too numerous to mention. 



TERMS-CASH 



HUBERT BRADY, Owner 

BRADFORD & DUNCAN, AUCTIONEERS 




—= 




T 



— — 



■^ 



— 







i 



uaby is, iM0 '. V-. i 1 " 



BOONS COUNTY 



BURLINGTON. KENTUCKY 



ss=s 



HAMILTON 



fet&fc ! Schaf fer, Mrs. ClMIord Ewers 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hartman, Jr., 

called on the and children. Afternoon callers 

. vaM'Mn. Ltezie Schwenke and son 

of Mr. and Mm Norman, Miss Lena Binder, James 

John Hartman, 8r., were Mrs^l*. Jones, Mrs. Georgia Ryle and 



Mrs. TImHB Ifnff 

IftraH irirwKmST 
Sunday guest* of 




SMITH'S GROCERY 



We Delivef — phone 74 



BURLINGTON, 



,er- 



n&l 



..•I. • 




box 



15c ,....-.... 3 lb. 






m 

MOTHER'S OATS , small box 15c ...\...., S lb. box 30c 

CREAM OF WHEAT large box 85c 

CAMPBELL'S FORK * BEANS .... J ... . . .16 os. can l«c 

GREEN BEANS, No. 2 can ....... It pts. per can 14c 

CORN, White, whole kernel, No. 2 can, 20 pts. per can 15c 

SFTNAOL No. I can ....Vhr.. . . ...lt-frta. per can 16c 

SWEET POTATOES, No. 3 can ... .... .,/... 19c 

PANCAKE FLOUR, 1 lb. 4 01., special box 5c 

NE W ENGLAN D PANCAKE SYRUP bottle 25c 

POPPED WHEAT, Cellophane bag . . . . » 2 for 15c 

STRAINED HONEY \, JR pt. jar 30c 

NU-MAID MARGARINE .>„;.. S pts. per lb. 20c 

CHURNGOLD MARGARINE 3 pts. per lb. 27c 

LARD, Caantry .;, amJK.J pts. per lb. 20c 

OR ANGES f,.^ per dozen 40c 

GRAPEFRUIT, pink meat «, 2 for 15c 

DELICIOUS APPLES per lb. 12c 

BOLOGNA 3 pts. per lb. 23c 

BOY-AR-DEE SPAGHETTI DINNER pkg. 35c 






Mr. Munker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Johnson 
and son Junior of Aurora, lad., were 
Saturday guests of M*» and Mrs. 
Wm. Huff. 

Everett Jones moved Henry Blan- 
chett from the Lewis Ryle farm to 
the farm of Mr. and Mrs. Tomlin 
near Walton, Saturday. 

Clifford Readnour, Miss Lillian 
Brlstow, -Mr. and Mrs. John Hart- 
man and John Schaeffer met at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 
Ryle, Saturday to transact busi- 

Connar" Carroll moved Mr. and 
Mrs. John Hartman, Br., to the 
home of their daughter, Mrs. John 
Schaeffer in Remington, O., Mon- 
day. We regret to lose these 
people from our 'community, after 
being residents of this place for 39 
year*. Mr. Hartman is in poor 
health at present. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hartman sold 
their farm last week to Clifford, 
Carl and Clarence Readnour. 

Wilma Hunt spent the wSeek-end 
with her aunt, Mr. and Mrs. 
Claude Black. Sunday guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Huff and son 
Oayle. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Black and fam- 
ily moved into the flat above Con 
ner Carroll's store last Tuesday. 



Mr. and Mrs. Earl Easton and 
family were guests at a lovely wed- 
ding dinner at the home of Mr 
■and Mrs. Omer Easton, Saturday 
evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed Roberts. 



I 



Cabinet Sinks - Showers PLUMBING SUPPLIES 

Light Fixtures for every room 
Water Heaters, Gas, Electric Coal 
R. E. A. Wiring - Switch Boxes - Switches 
Toilet Tanks and Bowls - Lavatories - Faucets 
Pin Up Lamps - Bed Lamps - Florescent Desk Lamps 
Pitcher Pumps - Electric Water Systems - Foot Yalves 
Laundry Trays - Pearl Toilet Seats - Sink Traps 
Gas, Coal and Oil Ranges - Bath Room Heaters 
Hot Air Furnaces - Gutter - Downspouting - 
Complete Line of Tools - Pipe Wrenches 
Enamelware - Cutlery 



Mr. and Mrs. William Rudicill 
are the proud parents of a 9% 
pound boy, born Monday night at 
their home on Burlington-Belleview 
Road. 



Steel Medicine Cabinets 
Electric Drill - Bells 



Door Locks - 
Towel Bars 
Transformers 



Roofing 
Vises 
Pad Locks 
Paper Rack 
- Wire 



Elements for Irons, Toasters, Heaters and Stoves 
Pipe - Valves - Chrome, Brass and Iron Fittings 
Pre-War Bath Tubs, Recessed, on Priority 
<f Winkler Stokers - Wiring Devices 






BLUEGRASS SUPPLY CO. 

(Formerly Lavanier Supply Co.) 

|\ ffl 12l' PIKE STREET COVINGTON 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES UEnilock 5726 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select FrOm 




All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 

CARDOSI 

NEW LOCATION 

2 Miles South of Florence 

Opposite Spanish Villa 

Telephone Flor. 386 



\M 



4-CAN SIZE 



America's Mos t 
• COMPLETE* 
FARM STORE 



milk cooler 
245-m 



FARM 
MASTER 



Saves time and labor in cooling 
milk for market. Refrigeration 
unit guaranteed for 5 years. Gray 
finish. . 





COAL BROODER 



FARM 
MASTER 



17 



Non-clog draft with cleaner. 2 
powerful thermostats, Burns hard 
or soft coal. 48-in. canopy. Broods 
300 six weeks chicks. 



DAVID BRADLEY 

TRAILER KIT 




New all steel kit. Converts Model ' 
A or V-8 Ford chassis into' farm 
wagon on high speed trailer. Bol- 
ster stakes adjustable from 38 to 
42 inches. Available with horse 
or stub pole. 




WATER FOUNTAIN 

Double wall fountain. Va- 
cuum feed type. Galvanized 
steel. 5- gallon 4% .30 

size <a£ 

STEEL MILK CAN 

Seamless neck and breast. 
No rivets in bottom. E* 25 
10-gal. size 4& 



FENCE 
CHARGER 

2450 

For battery or hi-line term- 
inals. Switches and extra 
fuses on bottom of case. Pro- 
tected from weather and 
animals. Compartment inside 
for 6-volt battery. 



<^&<xnA>, i\»*AwacA* 0^ 



I 



IS W. Seventh 



Covington 



HE. 2004 




SPEC! Afl4 HEW 8 

See Our Windows Starting 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19TI1 

For Special Announcement! 

QUALITY SAMPLE SHOES 

627 Madison Ave. Covington CO. 1430 

Open Saturday Evenings 



Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cason, of 
McVille were Sunday guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Rudicill and son 
and Mrs. J. W. Goodridge. 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kelly Clore, 
of Lexington, spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Eddins. 



William Huey, who is stationed 
with the Seabees at Providence, R. 
I., is spending a ten-day furlough 
with his wife, here. 



Mrs. J. L. Aylor and Miss Nancy 
Huey, of Petersburg were dinner 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Porter, last Tuesday evening. 



Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Combs 
son spent the week-end with rela- 
tives in Jonesvllle. 



Mrs. Frank Maurer entertained 
a group of friends at . her home 
last Thursday night. The guests 
were Mrs. Luther Smith, Mrs. 
Roscoe Akin and childern, Mrs. 
Raymond Combs and son, Mrs. 
William Townsend, Mrs. William 
Jarrell and Mrs. Pete Stephens. 



Mrs. Rosa Isaacs and Mrs. Henry 
Black were pleasant xttllers at The 
Recorder office Saturday morning. 
While here Mrs. Isaacs had her 
name placed on our subscription 
list. 



■ju u CARD OF THANKS 

We. wish to express our sincere 
thanks to the many friends for 
kindness shown during the illness 
and death of 

Mrs. Harriet Vie 

Especially do we wish to thank 
'.Dr. M. A. Yelton, for his untiring 
services and Philip Taliaferro for 
the efficient manner in which, he 
conducted funeral arrangements, 
and to the donors of the beautiful 
flowers, 
lt-p Mrs. Florence Brothers. 



JfOR SALE— 2ft tons 4t 
alfalfa, baled. $40.00 per 
Write 109 Erlanger Road, Br; 
er, Ky., or call Di 7603-41 



Mrs. Jake Cook spent last Sat- 
urday with Mrs. Jas. G. Smith. 

Mrs. A D. Yelton, Miss Mary 
Hood Gillaspie and Mrs. Harold 
Conner, of Florence were in Clncln 
natl last Saturday afternoon, sel 
ectlng some new books for the 
Homemakers' library. , 



Chas. W. Fowler, Mayor of Heb- 
ron states that one of the fair 
ladles of that community, appar- 
ently believes that they are oper- 
ating bus lines without collecting 
fares. 



Miss Frances Sebree of Lock- 
land, Ohio, Miss Bernice Sebree, 
who is attending the University of 
Kentucky, Lexington, and Miss 
Kathryn Sebree of Flemingsburg, 
Ky., spent the week-end with their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Dolpha Se- 
bree of Florence. 



BIG BONE 



Mrs. Garfield Hamilton and son 
Glenn have been on the sick list, 
but are improved at this writing. 

Joe Miller hauled coal for Mr. 
Hodge and Mrs. H. E. Miller, Satur- 
day. 

Mrs. Dora Jones and Mattie M. 
Miller called on Mrs. H. E. Miller, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Mabel Miller and daughter 
Dottie Young spent Wednesday 
with the Millers. 

Russell Miller, Jr., moved Ed- 
ward Hamilton from the Allen farm 
to Garfield Hamilton's place be- 
tween Beaver and Union. 

Wanda Lee Miller spent Satur- 
day night with her cousin Jackie 
Kline, of Erlanger. 

Mattie Miller spent Saturday 
night with Bertha Wood. 

Melvin Moore and wife called on 
his mother, Mrs. Ida Moore, Sun- 
day afternoon. 



IN LOVING MEMORY 

Of my mother, Mrs. Carrie M. 
Gross, who passed away February 
10, 1943. 
Deep in our hearts lies a picture 

O a loved one laid to rest; 
In memory's frame we shall keep it 

Because she was one of the best. 

She had a nature you couldn't help 

loving, 

A heart that was purer than gold 
And to those who knew her and 

loved her, 
Her memory will never grow old. 

Sadly missed by ber husband, 
daughter, son-in-law and grand- 
children. 



FOR SALE— Team of good Wtftk 
horses, weigh 1400 lbs., work any- 
where; also fresh cow- with sec- 
ond calf. Kirtley McWethy, 
Union, Ky. Tel. Flor. 403. 34-20 



It is estimated that approximate- 
ly 50,000 trees w^l be ordered in 
Marshall county for planting in 
February and March. 



COMMISSIONERS SALE 

Commonwealth of Kentucky 

Boone Circuit Court 
Irma Knasel, et al., Plaintiff 

versus 
John F. Walton, et al., Defendant 
NOTICE OF SALE 

By virtue of a Judgment and 
order of sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court rendered at the December 
Term thereof 1944, in the above 
cause, I shall proceed to offer for 
sale at the Court House door in 
Burlington, Kentucky, to the high- 
est bidder, at public auction on 
Monday, the 5th day of February 
1945 at One O'clock P. M., or there- 
about (being County Court Day), 
upon a credit of 6 months, the 
following described property to- 
wit: 

Lying and being in Boone Coun- 
ty Kentucky and being lots 2, 3, 4, 
5 and 6 Midway Place Subdivision 
on the Covington and Louisville 
Highway, the dimensions of said 
lots being shown in detail on the 
plat of said subdivision recorded 
in Plat Book No. 1 page 71 on the 
Boone County Records at Burling- 
ton, Boone County, Kentucky. 

For the purchase price, the pur- 
chaser must execute bond, with ap- 
proved surety bearing legal inter- 
est from the day of sale, until paid, 
and having the force and effect of 
a judgment. Bidders will be pre- 
pared to comply promptly with 
these terms. 

A. D. YELTON, 
Master Commissioner Boone C. C. 



SOLD! You're Too Late For These 4 Farms 
This Week! 

123 Acres, Verona; 69 Acres, Visalia; 3 Acres, Taylor Mill; 22 Acres 
Near Airport. 



OUT Taylor Mill, 5 acres; 4-room 

house. $2200. 
124 ACRES near Ryand; 5-room 

house, large barn, tenant house. 

$5500. 

63 ACRES 12 miles out, on black- 
top road, bus line; 5-room house, 
3 barns. $7500. 

100-ACRE Dairy and tobacco; 6- 
room house, electric; 3 barns; 15 
miles out $10,000. 

12 ACRES 20 miles out concrete 
road; 4-room house, basement, 
furnace, electric. $4500. 

7 ACRES on LLL; old buildings; 
good location, want offer. 

74 ACRES, Nicholson; 7-room 
house, electric; on school bus; 
good road. $7000. 

110 ACRES, Nicholson; best loca- 
tion in Kenton county; see sign. 

96 ACRES on LLL; on a bus line; 

6 -room one -floor; large barn, 
tenant house, vacant; possession 
now. 

116 ACRES near Independence; one 
of Kenton County's best modern 

homes; good buildings. 
14 ACRES near Independence; 6 

room modern home, barn and 

outbuildings. $8500. ' 

40 ACRES near Independence; 4- 

room house, electric, 2 barns, 

good road, tobacco base; vacant; 

to settle estate. $7000. 
300 ACRES near Wllliamstown ; 2 

houses, 4 barns, 5 acres tobacco 
. base. Per acre $35. 
47 ACRES near Gardnersvllle; niee 

5-room house, electric, dairy barn 

for 10 cows. $5500. 

53 ACRES— State Route 22; near 
Wllliamstown; 5-room house and 
barn. $4500. * ^ 



OUT Dixie Way: 40 acres; 6-rocm 
house and barn; no electric; off 
road; cheap at $3200. 

300 ACRES 20 miles gut, facing on 
2 roads; large colonial brick 
home, early American style; 2 
large stock barns, tenant house 
and barn; to settle estate. Per 
acre $65. ' ! £ 

100 ACRES on Dixie 15 miles out; a 
real tobacco and dairy form; 
good buildings. 

80 ACRES: side road; 6- room stone 
house, 2 barns, tenant house; 
this stone house cost $8000; 
owner says sell all for $6500. 

16% ACRES, Burlington pike near 

Florence; no buildings but nice 
level land with lake. $3000. i 

39 ACRES oh state road 20; 6- room 
house, 2 barns, 3 chicken houses, 
5 acres alfalfa, 8 acres of fruit; 
lots of water $6950. 

155 ACRES near Burlington; house, 
2 barns. Vacant; a cheap farm. 
Per acre, $60. 

77 ACRES near Limaburg; «ie- 
floor plan home, dairy barnjall 
level land. $10,500. 

160 ACRES near Dixie; nice new 
one-floor home, basement, furn- 
ace, electric, large barn nice level 
land. $14,000. 

240 ACRES near Burlington; 8- 
room house, 2 barns, large to- 
bacco base. Per acre $75. 

187 ACRES, Grant Co.; 7-room 

' house, 2 large barns, all for $8000 

CAMPBELL CO — 86 acres, Grant's 
Lick; level land; house and barn, 
electric. $6000. 

87 ACRES near Wesley Chapel; 6- 
room house, electric; 2 barns; to 
settle estate. $4500. 

43 ACRES near Alexandria; 4-room 
house, barn, 2 chicken houses. 
$3400. 



COMMISSIONER'S SALE 

Commonwealth of Kentucky 

Boone Circuit Court 
Raymond Cheesman, et al. Plaintiff 

versus 
George W. Cheesman, et al. 

Defendant 
NOTICE OF SALE 

By virtue of a Judgement and 
order of sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court rendered at the December 
Term thereof 1944, in the above 
cause, I shall proceed to offer for 
sale at the Court House Door in 
Burlington, Kentucky, to the high- 
est bidder, at public auction on 
Monday, the 5th day of March 
1945 at One O'clock P. M., or there- 
about (being County Court Day) 
upon a credit of 6 and 12 months, 
the following described property 
to- wit: 

Lots Nos. Twenty (20) and Twen- 
ty-one (21) of Glenn Subdivision, 
on Walton-Verona Pike, near the 
town of Walton, as shown by plat 
of said subdivision recorded in 
Plat Book No. 1, page 3, of the 
Boone County records at Burling- 
ton, KentucJor.:; '" * 

For the purchase price, the pur- 
chaser must execute bond, with 
approved surety bearing legal in- 
terest from the day of sale, until 
paid, and having the force and 
effect of a Judgment. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly 
with these terms. • 

A D. YELTON, 
Master Commissioner Boone C. C. 



FOR SALE— Fordson tractor with 
FergusorTplows; also- horse drawn 
disc harrow and 8*tnch David 
Bradley ifa^g|tedeTK7B. East- 
on, Price P^tteV Florence, Ky. Tel. 
Flor. 445. n-p, 



FOR SALE— Several gallon of good 
molasses. Price $2.00 per gallon. 
Can deliver around Burlington. 

5 Virgil S. Vice, Burlingtoir,;Ky., R. 
2. MBt-pd 




FOR SALE— 10-barrel slop tank, 
with 2-inch valve, in A-l condi- 
tion. Robert E. Grant, Burling- 
ton, Ky., R. 1. Tel. Burl. 353-X. lp 

FOR SALE TOBACCO PLANTERS, 
Bemus and Tiger makes, tractor 
discs corn cultivators and various 
equipment. Violetfs, Route 17, 
Madison Pike, Fiskburg, Ky. 1-p 



WANTED— Stock sheep. J. W. 
Eckler, WiUlamstowBu Ky. TeL 
Wllliamstown 4084. 34-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Gasoline automobile 
heater, work on any car. Bill 
Sullivan, Florence, Ky. Tel. Flor. 
758. lt-pd 



FOR SALE— Five-room house and 1 
acre lot in Petersburg; electric, 
garage, chicken house. Call J. 
W. Grant farm, Petersburg. 
James Hudson, Petersburg, Ken- 
tucky. 84-2t-p 



KENTON CO. SPECIAL 

123 ACRES, Green Pike; blacktop 
road; slick as a nlckle, rich, pro- 
ductive, good laying farm, fenced 
and cross fenced with woven wire 
to hold anything (bull or mouse) ; 
buildings all modern, up-to-date 
6-room house, furnace, electric, 
cabinet sink, electric pump, front 
and back porch, garage, 2 large 
chicken houses, milk house; 
(sanitary) dairy farm, tobacco 
farm; 6-acre base, tenant house, 
25 acres alfalfa hay. Also 18 
head of registered dairy cows, 

. farm tools of every kind; a real 
show place; selling on account 
of old age and ill health. If you, 
want a good farm, abundance of 
good water, come out, look for 
yourself. George Griffith, own- 

REL C. WAYMAN, Agent 

HE. 5107 Independence 5064 
i .i . . 



CLASSIFIED ADS 

RADIO REPAIRS at reasonable 
rates. COlonial 1121: 509 Scott 
St. tf 



WANTED— Man with family to 
raise 3 or 4 acres tobacco, 10 
acres corn and work by day when 
not in crop. G. B. Yates, Bur- 
lington, Ky. Tel. Burlington 
259. 33-2t-ch> 

FOR SALE— 1 new black and white 
porcelain tabletop cook stove, 
burns coal or wood; 1 Fannmast- 
er coal burning brooder, 350 
chick capacity, complete, like 
new. Tel. Burl. 462. 33-2c 



Don't Be Too Late 



I Exchange Dirt For Dough— You Furnish The Dough, 

I'll Furnish The Dirt 

REL C WAYMAN 



623 WASHINGTON ST. 
HEm. 5107 



COVINGTON 
In* 5064 



WANTED TO RENT— Farm on 50- 
50 basis. Can furnish half of 
stock and all of tools, if neces- 
sary. Can milk 10 to 12 cows, 
raise 3 or 4 acres of tobacco. Can 
give reference. John Hopperton, 
Burlington, Ky., R. 1. . Tel. Heb. 
146. 33-2t-p 



FOR SALE— Four-room plastered 
house with garage and large cis- 
tern on Route 20, about two 
squares from Anderson Ferry 
Road. This property has about 
1 acre ground. Write or call at 
residence of Frank Fisher, Con- 
stance, Ky. 29tf. 



WANTED— Tenant to tend 115 
acres, good land, Boone County; 
plenty water. Must have team, 
tools and sufficient help to raise 
4y 2 acres of tobacco, 15 acres corn 
15 acres hay; milk cows optional. 
E. Scherf , 860 Dixie Highway, Er- 
langer, Ky. 30-tf. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE— Four 
building lots, located in Carp- 
enter subdivision, Florence. Price, 
$500 or will trade for. cows or 
heifers. R. e. Eubanks, Ludlow, 
Ky., R. 2. 31-8t-pd. 



FOR SALE— Team of farm horses, 
gelding and mare. Cheap. E. 
Grater, Union, Ky. Tel. Flor- 
ence 293. 32-tf 



FOR SALE— Home Comfort range, 
practically new. K. E. Easton, 
Price Pike, Florence? Ky. Tel. 
Florence 445. lt-p 



DAIRY COWS— 25 head Brown 
Swiss, Holstein and Guernsey 
dairy cows. These are all record 
Wisconsin cows with plenty of 
quality; all T. B. and Bang's 
tested. Also 30 head of, mares 

, and horses, aged 4 to I years; 
all good chunks with plenty of 
quality; CHEAPf All stock guar- 
anteed. A week's trial given. 
Easy payments can be arranged. 
Hog feed, $1.75 per 100 lbs. GEN- 
ERAL DISTRD3UTORS, 30 E. 
Second St., Covington, Ky. Open 
Sunday. it-c 



WANTED— Dairy hand to work in 
sales barn; Good Salary. Apply 
GENERAL DISTRIBUTORS, 30 
E. Second St., Covington, Ky. lc 



FOR SALE— One 200-pound thor- 
oughbred Hampshire sow. Ed 
Berkshire, Burlington, Ky., R. 2. 
Tel. Burl. 465-X. l-c 

FOR SALE — Lard press in good 
condition. Mrs. Charles Chipman, 
848 Dixie Highway, Erlanger, 
Ky. lt-p 



FOR SALE— One team, mare and 
horse 5 years old, weigh 1400 lbs. 
each; 1 team mares 6 and 7 years 
old, weigh 1400 lbs., each. These 
are all good workers and are 
free from any stable cold. 
Joseph Randall, Petersburg, Ken- 
tucky. Tel. Burl. 232-X. 34-tf 



CUSTOM GRINDING every Mon- 
day. Roscoe Akin, Burlington, 
Ky. Tel. 170. 34-tf. 



FOR SALE— One Farmall tractor, 
on steel; complete with cultivat- 
ors, disc and plows. R. L. Bow- 
man, Ludlow, Ky., R. 2. Tel. 
Heb. 137. lt-c 



FOR SALE— Two O. I. C. male 
shoats, weigh 75 lbs. Earl Easton, 
Burlington, Ky. Tel. 274. lt-p 



FOR SALE— Pair ladles turf tan 
pumps, new. Ph. Burl. 71. lt-c 



INSURANCE— That repairs or re- 
places your car and pays all 
legal damage claims, plus medic- 
al and hospital service costs to 
yon, family or guests if injured. 
Prompt service; Save cash. 
Walter Gaines, Petersburg; Joe 
Bringenburg, Florence; Ryle Ew- 
bank, Warsaw, Ky. ofeb4« 



FOR WELL DRILLING— Call or 
write Hubert Farris, 3346 Read- 
ing Road, Cincinnati 29, Ohio. 
Plaza 1210. Work ,. guaranteed; 
pumps set and repaired. omar22 



INCREASE YOUR PROFITS WITH 
HELM'S GOVERNMENT AP- 
PROVED CHICKS. Pullorum 
controlled. Improved for years 
with America's heaviest laying 
strains. R. O. P. sired matings. 
Sexed chicks. Free brooding 
bulletin. HELM'S HATCHERY 
Paducah, Ky. oaugl 



TWENTY YEABS in radio servicing 
W. ML STEPHENSON, Radio 
Specialist, 509 Scott Blvd., Cov- 
ington. COlonial 1121. tf. 



AVOID DISAPPOINTMENT 
—BUY NOW 

Dining Room Suites 




Avenue furniture Co. 



501 Madison, Cov. HE. *273 
MOBB FOB TOOK MONEY 






■M 



MM^A^ 



————————— 







65TH DISTRICT 
TOURNEY SET 



FAST GAMEJtt NEW HAVEN 18 
SKT FOB THURSDAY EVENING, 
MARCH L-BURLINGTON NEW 
HAVEN FIRST TO MEET. 



The 65th District Basketball 
tournament, comprised -of Burling 
ton, Hebron and New Haven 
Schools, will get under way on the 
New Haven hardwood Thursday 
evening, March 1st at 8:00. The 
New Haven and Hebron reserve 
teams will compete In the first 
game of the evening. The second 
game, starting at 9:00 will see the 
Burlington and New Haven "A" 
teams battling for the privilege to 
play in the finals on Saturday 
evening, March 3rd. 

The winner of the reserve game 
will meet the Burlington reserves 
In the finals on Saturday evening 
at eight o'clock. At nine o'clock 
on Saturday evening the winner 
of the Burlington-New Haven "A" 
team game will meet the Hebron 
five In the finals to compete for 
the trophy and the honor of repre- 
senting the 05th District in the 
9th Regional tournament during 
the second week in March. 

The referees will be "Kit" Car- 
son, coach at Dixie Heights high 
school, and Don Tanner of Union. 
The official score keeper will be A. 
W. Weaver, of Burlington. The of- 
ficial timekeeper will be secured 
In the near future. The Union De- 
posit Bank will donate the trophy 
tothe winner of the "A" team 

finals. - _iii 

The New Haven P.-T. A. will 
handle the concessions. The doors 
will open each evening at 6:45 and 
all games start promptly on time. 
Admission, students 30c. adults 50c. 



New Haven To Be Host 

In Benefit Game Friday 

The New Haven five will enter- 
tain the Burlington five on the 
New Haven floor on Friday even- 
ing, February 39. The proceeds of 
this game will be donated to the 
American Red Cross and the Ft. 
Thomas Convalescent Hospital. 
This promises to be a good game 
as the teams are fairly evenly 
matched and much interest will 
be shown In this pre-tourney 
tusssle. 

Come and support your team and 
at the same time have a part in 
this worthy cause. Admission 20c 
and 30c. 



Morten 



diaries Beacom 



Funeral services for George J. 
Horton, of Union, Boone County, 
will be held at the Big Bone Bap- 
tist Church today (Thursday) at 
1 p. m. Burial will be in the BJg 
Bone Cemetery. He was 72, 

Mr. Horton, a retired farmer ana 
a lifelong resident of Boone coun- 
ty, died Monday at his home fol- 
lowing a long Illness. 

He is survived by his widow, 
Mrs. Sally Horton; one daughter, 
Mrs. Marie McNeely^ Cincinnati; 
one brother Sanders Horton, Ris- 
ing Sun, Ind.', and four grandchil- 
dren. 

Tharp & Stith, Florence funeral 
directors were in charge of funeral 
arrangements. 



ERLANGER CIVIC 
LEADER IS CALLED 



HENRY F. CHILDRESS DIES OF 
HEART ATTACH ON STREETS 
OF ERLANGER— WAS FROMIN 

ENT JEAN. 



SALE IS 
OVER THE TOP 



| TO FINAL REPORT 
COUNTY CHAIRMAN- 
SALE AMOUNTS TO 9944.72 IN 
COUNTY. 



The Boone County Christmas 
Seal sale has gone over the top by 
more than' forty dollars, according 
to a statement released this week 
toy R. V. Lehts, Executive Secre- 
tary Of the Boone County Tuber- 
culosis Association. The sale 
amounted to more than $900. 

The sale of each school district 
was as follows: 

Belleview .$ 99.50 

Burlington ».. 147.89 

Burlington colored school. 24.94 

Constance 86.98 

Florence 176.09 

St. Paul .■„' 7.1 

Hamilton 18.78 

Hebron 128.87 

Petersburg 44J4 

Union .-. * 99.35 

Verona •.••• ••*•»• 51.50 

Walton 118.75 

Miscellaneous 10.42 



Funeral services were held at 3 
p. m. Saturday at Taylorsport 
Methodist Church, Boone County, 
for Charles Beacom, 88, retired 
Boone County farmer, who died 
Thursday at his home in Taylors- 
port. Burial was In the church 
cemetery. 

Mr. Beacom was a member oi 
the Excelsior Lodge, Junior Order, 
U. A. M- and of the Taylorsport 
Methodist Church. 

Be Is survived by three sons, 
Charles Beacom, Middletown, O.; 
Raymond Beacom, Sayler Park, O.; 
and William Beacom, at home; a 
brother Carl Beacom, Taylorsport 
and a daughter, Mrs. W. R. Price, 
Middletown, Ohio. 

Funeral arrangements were in 
charge of the Catherman funeral 
home, of Ludlow. 

HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 

Paul Rimmer, Pastor 
The weekly Lenten Service will 
begin at Hebron Lutheran Church 
on Thursday evening at 7:30. 
..The Hebron Council will meet 
lor a short session immediately 
following the service. 



SPECIALISTS WILL 
ADDRESS FARMERS 



IN ALL-DAX>MEETING AT BUR- 
UNGTOnIdOUBTHOUSE TUES- 
DAY, FEB T»— FERTILIZATION 
DAIRY FEEDING, SUBJECTS. 



Henry F. Childress, 66, collapsed 
Tuesday morning while standing 
on the Dixie Highway at Graves 
Avenue/ HWanger waiting for the 
auto In which he customarily rode 
to Cincinnati, where he was em- 
ployed as manager of the special 
envelope service department of the 
Chatflekl Paper Corporation. 

He was removed to his home, 114 
Elm Street where Dr. W. R. Miner, 
of Ft. Mitchell pronounced him 
dead. 

He was the father of Capt. Henry 
P. Childress, Jr., former spprts ed- 
itor of The Kentucky Post and now 
stationed with the Marine Corps 
at Camp Lejeune, N. C, following 
15 months' duty in the South Pa- 
cific and Cpl. Richard Childress, 
of Will Rogers Field, Okla. 

Mr. Childress was a member of 
the Erlanger Baptist Church, Good 
Faith Lodge F and A. M., Cincin- 
nati Advertisers' Club, Cincinnati 
Chamber of Commerce Forum, 
Cincinnati Masonic Club and the 
Cincinnati Sales Executives' Club. 
He was a past master of Good 
Faith Lodge. 

Interested in local history, Mr. 
Childress wrote a history of Er- 
langer in 1928; of Good Faith 
Lodge at Its centennial celebration 
in 1984, and upon the occasion of 
the 50th anniversary of the Er- 
langer Baptist Church in 1940. 

Besides his son, he is survived 
by his widow, Mrs. Kathleen Foley 
Childress; one brother L. L. Child- 
ress, Erlanger and one sister, Miss 
Statira Childress, of Louisville. 

Funeral arrangements are In 
charge of the Philip Taliaferro 
funeral home, Erlanger. 



Total $944.72 

The Boone County Tuberculosis 
Association wishes to thank this 
paper, the teachers of each school, 
the pupils, and the many purchas- 
ers of the Christmas Seals for their 
cooperation in making the sale a 
success. 

Sixty-eight per cent of the pro- 
ceeds wih be used right here in 
Boone County to aid tubercular 
patients, according to Mr. Lents. 
He further stated that there are 
now two patients in sanitariums 
and two more ready to enter the 
sanitarium which will cost the 
Boone County Tuberculosis Associ- 
tion more than $12 a day. 

No one connected with the Boone 
County organization receives any 
pay. All proceeds except the 
amount necessary for postage and 
stationery go for T. B. ( , 

Mrs. Rodamer's room of Burling- 
ton and Mrs Coyle's room of the 
Constance school won > the extra 
prizes for selling the most seals per 
room. 



• '* • • • 
WARNING ISSUED — 

TRUCK OPERATORS 

Due to the present serious 
condition of the roads In 
Boone County caused by the 
weather during the past 
weeks, and the additional 
damage that will be caused 
during the next few weeks by 
heavy hauling. It Is hereby 
ordered by the Boone Coun- 
ty Fiscal Court that all 
trucks operating on any of 
the County roads must Vurit 
their loads to two tons, or 
leas, in exeess of the 
of the truck 

This drastic order Is 
sary to stop further damage 
and the Boone County Fiscal 
Court will greatly appreci- 
ate the cooperation of all 
truck operators, and the pat- 
ience of the citizens of the 
County who must travel 
these roads, and the Court 
wishes to assure them that 
the roads will be repaired as 
soon as possible. 

The Boone County Road 
Department has more than 
300 miles of road to main- 
tain with a crew of ten or 
twelve men, and due to the 
labor shortage It is impossible 
to employ additional men. 
With the present road crew 
it will take months to repair 
the damage caused to the 
roads during the last few 
weeks. 
Boone County Fiscal Court. 



• 



KICK-OFF MEETING 
SET FEBRUARY 28 



FOR BED CROSS WAE FUN» 
DRIVE— WAR MOVIE WBLL BE 
SHOWN AT MEETING HELD IN 
FLORENCE SCHOOL. 



On February 28 at 7:30 p. m. 

* I there will be the "kick-off" meeting 
•» for the Red Cross War Fund Drive 

* Jin Boone County held in the Flor- 
' fence school house. The public is 



> 



FARMERS URGED TO 
SECURE FERTILIZER 



NEEDS EARLY— SUPPLY WILL 
BE LIMITED ACCORDING TO 
SURVEY OF INDUSTRY— OPA 
HOLDS TO CEILING PRICE. 



Methodists Plan 

Special Youth Rally 

>A special,. Youth Gospel Team 
will visit the Burlington Methodist 
Church for a week-end of services. 
This team is composed of Miss 
Ruthanne Shockley, Asbury Col- 
lege, Miss Marjorie Johnson, As- 
bury Theological Seminary, and 
Rev. John Blackford, seminary. 

These services will begin Satur- 
day evening at 7:30. These young 
people will give their experiences 
and rendered special messages and 
special music in song. 4 

Rev. John Blackford will preach 
Sunday evening. 

The public is cordially invited to 
attend, and a special invitation Is 
extended to all the young people. 
Come expecting a real blessing. 



Lynn Copeland, dairy specialist 
and Wm. Johnstone, field agent in 
crops work from the College, will 
address Boone County farmers in 
an all-day meeting at Burlington 
courthouse on Tuesday, February 
27th, according to H. R. Forkner, 
County Agent. The morning pro- 
gram starting at 10:00 a. m. will be 
devoted to crop fertilization and 
improved feed crop production 
practices. The afternoon program, 
starting at 1:00 p. m. will be devot- 
ed to latest dairy feeding and 
breeding developments that will be 
o* interest to all dairymen. 

Wm. Johnstone will lead the 
morning discussion, giving an out- 
line of new findings that are in- 
creasing pasture, hay and grain 
yields. Feed crops are the found 
ation of profitable agriculture In 
the country. Johnstone is rated as 
one of the authorities on improved 
production practices of these crops 

Lynn Copeland, former head of 
testing work of the American Jer 
sey Cattle Club, is an outstanding 
authority on dairy oattle breeding. 
The couutyt is foctiuutle in *e«iui' 
ing these two outstanding discus 
sion leaders at this time. All farm 
ers are invited and it is hoped i 
large number can attend. 



Taylorsport Boy 



Reported Wounded 



Pfc. William E. Aylor, 32, hus 
band of Mrs. Elizabeth Aylor and 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Aylor, 
of Taylorsport, was wounded in 
action Feb. 1 in Germany, his fam- 
ily has been advised", by the War 
Department. He now is recovering 
in a Belgium hospital. 

Pfc. Aylor has been decorated 
with the Purple Heart, with' an Oak 
Leaf Cluster, denoting his second 
combat injury. He was hospitaliz- 
ed four months after suffering the 
first wound. ,'■-,, 



Moore-Darby 



Winters Farm Sold 

Fred Winter sold bis 50-acre 
farm, 1 mile out on East Bend 
Road, known as the C. C. Hughes 



farm, to Mr. and Mrs. Alex Jones 
of Union. Mr. Jones has been a 
tenant on the farm of Joseph Huey 
for the past few years and will 

£bntlnut with Mr. Hutj thk y&u 
and later build on his purchase 
n materials are available. The 



The marriage of Miss Helen E, 
Moore, eldest daughter of Mr. and) 
Mrs. A. J. Moore, of Covington and 
Cpl. John Robert Darby, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Vester Hisle, of Florence 
was solemnized Monday, Feb. 5th 
at the Southside Baptist Church 
with Rev. O. J. Steger officiating 
at the double ring ceremony. 

Prior to the ceremony, two beau- 
tiful vocal selections were render- 
ed, "The Sweetest Story Every 
Told," by Miss Jane Bristow and 
"O Promise Me" by Russell Hodge. 

The bride who was given In mar- 
riage by her father wore a white 
bridal dress with shoulder-length" 
veil, which fell in soft folds from 
two white ostrich plumes. She car- 
ried a bouquet of white rose buds 
and carnation*; tied with white 
satan streamers. 

Her attendants were her sister, 
Mrs. Mildred Victor matron of hon- 
or, Miss Kittle F. Darby, Miss Hel- 
en Darpel and Mrs. Ruth Meranda 
another sister of the bride. 

The matron of honor was attired 
to pink chiffon, carrying pink car- 
natlons tied with blue satin 
streamers. The bridesmaids wore 
pink, aqua, and blue chiffon, all 
carrying carnations. 

The groom had as his best man, 
Cpl. Wm. C. Stottiebowers, who 
served with the groom in the 
Southwest Pacific for 35 months. 

Following the ceremony the 
couple left for a short bridal trip 
In Indiana, after which the groom 
will return overseas. The bride 
will reside with her parents for. &e. 
duration. 



sale was handled through A. 
Renaker. 



B 



Boone County farmers are urged 
to order and secure their fertiliz- 
ers immediately, according to. H. R. 
Forkner, County Agent: Leading 
farmers in planning the local 1945 
agricultural improvement pro- 
grams, consider this one of the im 
portant farm jobs that should be 
done. now. 

The survey of the fertilizer In- 
dustry shows that the supply of 
commercial fertilizers this year 
will be limited but that more farm- 
ers can be served If deliveries can 
be made early. Commercial ferti- 
lizer prices have been held at pre- 
war levels under OPA celling prices 
while prices of farm crops have 
advanced. Fertilizers are neces- 
sary for maximum and most effi- 
cient yields and farmers are plan- 
ning to use record amounts this 
year. 

Prof. P. E. Karracker, head of 
agronomy department at the Col- 
lege, advises that sulphate of pot- 
ash, commonly used on tobacco, 
will be in many cases, most diffi- 
cult to secure. He advises that a 
grower may use a complete ferti- 
lizer on tobacco containing murit- 
ate of potash up to 1000 pounds 
per acre In a 8-8-6 analysis. If 
more than the 60 pounds of potash 
found In this amount of the above 
analysis is used, it should be in the 
sulphate form. This statement is 
Important In that the tobacco crop 
especially suffers from potash de- 
ficiency "and In that many Boone 
County farmers are planning to 
use 1000 or more pounds of com- 
plete fertilizer per acre. 

Straight nitrogen and phosphate 
fertilizers are also scarce this year. 
The A. A. A. will probably secure 
less phosphate and It may be de- 
livered later in the season. The 
County Agent's office advises that 
the wise farmer will probably ord- 
er and secure his fertfilaer needs 
at the earliest possible date. If 
one dealer can not supply your 
need, see another one* The deliv- 
ered materials should be stored in 
a good dry place and held for use 
until needed. 



invited to attend, and this promises 
to be a most interesting occasion. 
A War movie, showing the Red 
Cross at work will be shown, and 
two soldiers from the AAF Con- 
valescent Hospital, Ft. Thomas, 
have been Invited to tell what the 
Red Cross has done for them per- 
sonally. The always popular Boone 
County School Band has been ask- 
ed to furnish music. Admission is 
free. 

Boone County's quota In the War 
Fund Drive, which starts March 1, 
Is $6,800.00. There are approxim- 
ately nine hundred Boone County 
boys in the Armed Services, so it 
will mean only eight dollars will 
have to be collected for each of 
our boys. The Red Cross is always 
ready to serve any boy that needs 
it. Let's make our contributions 
large this year and "keep the Red 
Cross at his side." 
Excerpts from Recent News Stories 
In Sibul, Luzon, American and 
Allied men rescued from Cabano- 
tuan, receiving cigarettes and com- 
fort articles— their first in many 
months— from American Red Cross 
representatives, acknowledged re- 
ceipt of Red Cross messages from 
home and parcels of food and med- 
icine during imprisonment in the 
Philippines. 

When internees were liberated 
from Luzon they said, "If we had 
not received Red Cross medical 
supplies, food, and clothing In De- 
cember 1943, most of us would not 
have survived. 

Several shipments of Red Cross 
chapter-produced clothing were 
prepared^?***'. Philippines at the 
request of General MacArthur's 
headquarters, well In advance of 
the capture of Manila. Special 
articles were shipped /for civilian 
internees to meet immediate needs, 
but the bulk of the supplies is be- }*' 
lng sent to the Islands for distri- 
bution to Filipinos and U. S. citi- 
zens according to need. 

An average of 1,600 tons of par- 
cels per week during 1944 has been 
shipped from the United States to 
our prisoners of war. 



ton, Gallatin, Boone and , CmiwH 
Counties, Kentucky, and that the 
Cooperative had hoped *e ••*« 
than double its present mileage 
and members by Post War Con- 
struction on an area coverage basis 
tout that the above action of REA, 
marts necessary by the recent Pub- 
lie. Service Commission ruling, will 
greatly handicap, if not entirely 
eliminate, this Cooperative's plans. 
The lines now operate* by the 
local Cooperative are f inaneed by 
an REA loan and the Cooperative 
has made all its interest and prtn 
cipal payments as they came due 
and has invested approximately 
$40,000.00 of its depreciation reserve 
fund in loan prepayments and Wat 
Bonds. ' m \ 

The text of Acting Administrat- 
or Neal's letter is as follows: 
To Mr. Curtis Brown, President, 
Kentucky Rural Electric "> • 

Cooperative Assn. . r * ! 

Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Ky. 
Dear Mr. Brown: • 

The Rural Electrification Ad- 
ministration Is compeUedrto wm- 
pend all further loan allotments 
for Kentucky pending completion 
of new feasibility studies taking 
into consideration the full implica 



ttTHfeOMRttrl 
SUCCUMBS AT 79 




FUNERAL SERVICES 

UNGT 
CHURCH. 

t < ' .* 

Jeff M. Eddlns, 79, lifelong rest- 
dent of Boone County paisrrt sway 
at his home in Burlington on 
Thursday, after being seriously III 
for three weeks. He had been hi 01 
health for several 

Mr. Eddlns, a retired 
born near Union, Ky. He was a 
member of title Burlington 
dlst Church, and was wen 
and respected throughout the 
county. He and his wife Mrs. Lizzie 
Eddlns celebrated their sixty- 
ond wedding anniversary 
her 8th. 

Besides his wife, he is 
by two sons, Jessie R. and Stanley 
Eddlns, both of Burlington; two 
daughters, Mrs. H. E. White, of 
Burlington and Mrs. Joseph Wal- 
ton, of Erlanger; seven grandchil- 
dren and five great-gra n d ch ild r en. 

Funeral services were conducted 
from the Burlington Methodist 
Church, Sunday afternoon at 2:30, 
with Rev. O. B. Thomas and Rev. 
R. A. Johnson, officiating. Burial 
was in the L O. O. F. Cemetery, 
Burlington 

Funeral arrangements were hi 
charge of the Philip Taliaferro fu- 
neral home, Erlanger. 






tions of the January 22 ruling by 
the Kentucky Public Service Com 
mission. This ruling grants the 
application of the Kentucky and 
West Virginia Power Company te 
construct 1186 miles of line in six- 
teen eastern Kentucky counties. 

A very substantial proportion X 
the consumers on the Power Com 
pany's proposed lines are members 
of existing REA cooperatives. On 
the basis. of their applications for 
service from the cooperation REA 
funds had been made available to 
finance construction of the lines 
necessary to serve them. Commis- 
sion certificates had been obtain- 
ed here by the cooperatives for 
some of the lines, which were re- 
leased for construction and ad- 
vances were made by the Govern- pfc. Virgil H. Oulley, son of Mr. 
ment to cover the initial costs, the and Mrs. Lloyd Oulley, of Union R. 



intervention of the war and the »*■ 
suiting War Production Board r*r- 
strlctions made it impossible, of 
course, for-«.the cooperatives .to 
build the lines. But since it seem 



Virgil Galley Reports 
Seriously 



1, has been reported seriously 
wounded in action January 10 at 
Luxembourg, according to a tele- 
gram from the War Department, 
■received by his wife. 



ed clear that construction was, only I ,Ffe. Oulley Is a graduate of the 
postponed until materials again be- New Haven High School, and ts 
came available, REA officials have we u known throughout the county. 

At present he ts confined to 
the Lawson General Hospital, At- 



REA PROGRAM 
JEOPARDIZED 



COMPELLED TO SUSPEND FUR- 
THER LOAN ALLOTMENTS FOR 
KENTUCKY AS RESULT OF RE- 
CENT RULING. 



came _ 

had no question as to the adequacy 
of the Government's security and 
substantial additional allotments 
for post-war construction In Ken- 
tucky have been freely made. 

The Commission's Order auth- 
orizing the Power Company to serve 
these cooperative members makes 
impossible the completion of the 
projects for which loans in the 
state would be self-liquidating. 

REA cooperatives, in order to ac- 
complish complete area coverage, 
must necessarily Include some of 
the more densely settled territory 
If, after a cooperative has com- 
pleted plans for service In a part- 
icular area and obtained an REA 
loan to finance the necessary con- 
struction, Commission action al- 
lows a Power Company to serve the 
consumers to the more densely 
populated areas, the security for 
the loan Is threatened and may 
well become Inadequate. I am sure 
you will understand that the ac- 
tion we feel forced to take does not 



lanta, Ga., suffering from wounds 
to his right arm. 

The telegram received from Mrs. 
Dorothy J. Gulley, follows: 

"Regret to Inform you your hus- 
band Private First Class Virgil H. 
Gulley was seriously wounded in 
action tenth January in Luxem- 
bourg. Mall address follows direct 
from hospital with details. Delay 
in notification due to difficulty hi 
ascertaining your present address. 
J. A. Ulk>,- the Adjutant General." 



Rev. J. W. Campbell Is much im- 
proved after a recent Illness. 



Awarded Bronze Star 



Acting Administrator William J. 
Neal of the Rural Electrification 
Administration has notified H. 
Curtis Brown, President of the 
Kentucky Rural Electric Coopera- 
tive Association, that loan allot- 
ments to all Kentucky Cooperatives 
have been suspended because of a 
recent Kentucky Public Service 
Commission ruling affecting the 
security of Government funds in- 
vested or to be Invested. 

The ruling, granting a certificate 
to the Kentucky-West Virginia 
Power Company, to build lines of 
which part had been granted to 
four R. E. A. Cooperatives to earlier 
certificates, was made January 22, 
1945. 

Mr. Brown expressed disappoint- 
ment at this R. E. A. action, but 
said it w8h necessary. "REA makes 
loans, not grants," he~ said. "On 
the basis of earlier commission 
rulings REA had not only 1 agreed 

actually ad 



Help Keep Cookie 

Jar Filled At Hospital 



. 



In the Boone County day room 

at the AAF Convalescent Hospital, 

Ft Thomas, Is a cookie Jar, which 

Boone County women plan to keep 

filled for the soldiers, each corn- 
nun we *cci muvwu w »«« »««. «-~- . ,. ,. ..._,. - ---.. — 

emanate from any lack of Interest k^ta^ijstarn. >£■*•£ 
on our part in the 297,000 rural \Mvsb ^* ??WK.^fcJ£ 
families in Kentucky who do not V*^"*^.**^.*^ 
now have electric service, but it Is mode cookies please give 
based solely on the l e qulrs so ent of 
the REA Act that our loans be self- 
liquidating. 

Sincerely, 

WILLIAM J. NEAL, 

Acting Admiiiiatr 



Four-K Specialist 

Visits Boone Couaty 

Miss Edith Lacy, 4-H Home Ec- 
onomics specialist, spent one day. 
in Boone County last week. .She 
met with local 4-H leaders In Flor- 
ence and Hebron. Plans for pro- 
ject Instruction were outlined at 
each meeting. 

Previous to the meeting. Miss 
Lacy visited the yard goods depart- 
ments of several stores. The ma- 
jority of stores had little. If any, 
cotton materials on the shelves. 



made cookies pie 
Mrs. H. R. Forkner 
that date. 



to 

before 







5arj&iwi=5ssai^j»-L»**s«af 



Tech. 5 Ruther D. Hodges, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. 1, has been award- 
ed the Bronze Star by Major Gen- 
eral Maurice Bene, Commanding 
General of the Third Armored Di- 
vision for outstanding achievement 
and gallantry in action during the 
fight against the German winter 
offensive, according to an an- 
nouncement received here this 
week. 



Mrs. Plummer Oulley and Mrs. 
W. P. Beemon are on the sick list aJble." 
this Week. 



tlon costs. The cooperatives must 
repay this money but they cannot 
build the lines from which they 
expect to receive the necessary in- 
come to pay back the loans." 

"REA Cooperatives want to get 
area coverage. Area coverage meads 
that if any one can get electric 
service, every one ought to be able 
to have it without prohibitive costs 
to any one. We, as REA Cooper- 
atives, can do the job bettor than 
any other agency because that is 
what we were set up and organized 
to do. The Commission ruling 
makes area coverage almost impos- 



Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Akin and 
daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Earl 
Sullivan and daughter spent Fri- 
day to Lexington. 



sacks, printed and plain,' for their 
sewing work in many projects. 
Those who do not have feed sacks 
probably will have to shop to many 
stores before finding suitable ma- 
terials, according to Miss Lacy. 

Home Economic project instruc- 
tion will be started in several 
clubs this week, according to Mary 
Hood Gillaspie, Home Demonstra- 
tion Agent 



The Owen County Rural Electric 

DeBell, Manager, "said, is operating 
897 miles of line serving 2800 mem- 
ber consumers in Owen, Scott, 
Grant, Pendleton, Campbell, Ken- 



R. D. Martin Tt Speak Here 

Rev. R. D. Martin, Promotional 
Director of Georgetown College, 
and former pastor of Erlanger Bap- 
tist Church, will be guest 
at the Burlington Baptists Church 

on flw'"" pvf»T»fn«» Vr'i ** «* V'W* 

p. m. 

A very interesting message is 
promised for the occasion and the 
public Is Invited to 



BY ORCHARD MEN OF 

COUNTY— MORNING 
TO BB HELD Df COUNTY OF- 
FICE. 



Two winter fruit planning meet- 
ings win be held Wednesday, 
ruary 28th, according to 1 
Forkner, County Agent. W. W. 
Oill, field agent .in orchard 
from the College, will be present as 
the meetings to assist to present- 
ins? the 1946 fruit outlook and to 
advise on new developments that 
may affect this year's 
practices. 

The morning 
at 10:00 a. m. at the County . 
office to Burlington, will be fol* 
lowed by a visit to a nearby orch- 
ard where field inspections will be 

ade. The afternoon meeting will 
toe held on the farm of C. Listen 
Hempfling of near Taylorsport. AH 
fruit growers ate Invited 
to attend one or both of 




= I 



■— 



— 



' 



». 



^5= 



= 



ah 



THE BOONS COUNTY RSOORDXR, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



tHMIE CDUNTY RECORDER 





A. E. afUBKKS, Bdttor and On—a 
RAYMOND OOMBS, Asm. Editor 


Altered at tlw Post Office. Burlington, Ky., as Second Glass MaU Matter 


■' ff 


ri Ill ETEBT THURSDAY 



ADV&KT9UNO MEDIUM IN BOONE COUNTY 
AD VERneftNQ INFORMATION 
DISPLAY: 25c per dcJnaon Inch. 



NOTICES AND CARDS of THANKS: 25 words and under 50c. Over 25 

words $1.00. _. _^_ ^ 1_ 

OLASSDnSD ADS: 25 words for 25c; minimum 25c; each additional 
ward one cent each. AD classified ads. payable in advance 
MECHANICAL INFORMATION: Columns to page, 7; column width 13 
ems; column depth, 21 Inches. Use mats or electros. 



Subscription Rate $ 1>50 Per year 



MEMBER 



AMERICAN PRESS 

For Over Fifty Yean 



NORTH BEND ROAD 



KOmJcKY PRES! 

As sociation , 

iniifRi TTnnTiitt 



DEAD STOCK 
REMOVED FREE 

For Prompt Removal of 

HORSES and COWS 

CALL 

BURLINGTON 95 

. We pay 'phone, charges 

Boone County Fertilizer 
Company 

BURLINGTON, - KENTUCKY 



Mr. and Mrs. Howard Wilson 
and Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilson 
and daughter were supper guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Wilson, on 
Tuesday evening*. 

Mrs. Franklin Ryle spent Thurs- 
day with Mrs. Bernard Wilson and 
daughters, of Hebron. 

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Aylor has been quite ill the 
past week. 

Mrs. John Jones called on Mrs. 
Grace Graves, Monday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Blaker enter- 
tained Mr. and Mrs. William Blak- 
er and family, Sunday. 

Bro. and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton 
and family called on Bro. and Mrs. 
W. T. Gardner, Sunday afternoon. 

Alice Ruth Eggleston and Wayne 
Gray were supper guests of Alice 
Eggleston . and nephew George 
Humphrey, Jr., Thursday.. 

Mrs. Ella Mae Mahorney < and 
son Johnny have been staying 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Cave the past few days. 

Mrs. Ada Gross was called to 
Bromley, Friday on acount of her 
mother, Mrs. Anderson, who is ser- 
iously ill. 

.Mrs. Grace Graves spent Tuesday 
with Mrs. Dell Graves and children 
of Hebron., 

Mrs'. Josie Blaker and son, of 
Pt. Pleasant called on Mr. and 
Mrs. Jake Blaker, Monday. 

Boatswain Ralph Eggleston-»and 
wife were Sunday guests of Miss 
Alice Eggleston. 

Elizabeth Stahl of Ft. Mitchell 
and Mrs. Mary Humphrey of Wal- 



ton, spent the week-end with rel- 
atives here. 

Bro. and Mrs. L. M. Hamilton 
and children and Mrs. Emma 
Moore and family were supper 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Kil- 
gour and -daughters, Tuesday. 

Betty Faye Eggleston was Friday 
night guest of Margie Ann Kil- 
gour. 

Mrs. Arthur Benson spen* Thurs- 
day In Covlnirton. shopping. 

Mr. and! Mrs. Ernest Collins and 
Mrs. Minnie Shawe entertained 
Friday for relatives. • 



HEBRON 



Mrs. Smith Goodridge, of Franc- 
"isvllle spent Thursday with Mrs. 
Grace ^ylor and Mrs. Roy Garnett. 



Mrs. Chester Goodridge^was the 
guest of Miss Laura McGlassori, of 
Taylorsport, last Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elza Poston and 
family and Miss Mary Jean Hen- 
sley of Burlington, were the Sat- 
urday evening 'dinner guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Poston and 
daughter. 

Rev. Paul Rimmer has started his 
work as pastor of Hebron-Hopeful 
Lutheran Churches. 

Miss Emalu Sprague, of Sayicr 
Park spent Friday night with Miss 
Jean Poston. 



Bowel Cleaning Power 

Of Erb-Help Medicine 



REMEMBERWHEN 



— the Chautauqua pitched tent each 
summer? It dispensed education and 
entertainment in easy doses for both 
young and old at convenient hours 
during the day and evening. That was 
before the movies captured America. 
Remember? 



CATHERMAN 
FUNERAL HOME 

Tel CO 2580 Ludlow, Ky. 



t^ / r- A 



l|r 



•:g 



One man recently took ERB- 
HELP three days and said after- 
ward that he never would have be- 
lieved his body contained so much 
filthy substance. He says his 
stomach, intestines, bowels and 
whole system were so thoroughly 
cleansed that his constant head- 
aches came to an end, several pim- 
ply skin eruptions on his face dried 
up overnight, and even the rheu- 
matic pains in his knee disappear- 
ed. At present he is an altogether 
different man, feeling fine in every 
way. 

ERB-HELP contains 12 Great 
Herbs; they cleanse bowels, clear 
gas from stomach, act on sluggish 
liver and kidneys. Miserable peo- 
ple soon feel different all over. So 
don't go on suffering! Get ERB- 
HELP. Elsmere Pharmacy, Dixie 
Highway. — Adv.. 



POSTED 

All persons are nereny notified 
that the lands of the following 
are "posted against hunting, and 
trespassing. Violators of this notice 
are subject to fines: . 

W. E. Hentschel, East Bend road, 
Burlington R. 2. 

H. W.- Baker Farm, Petersburg. 

The farm of J.'W. Marsh on 
Woolper Creek. 

John O. Richards,, Jr., farm, 
Florence, Ky. 

NOTE — Names will be added to 
the 'above list for $1.00 each and 
'will be carried in this paper each 
week throughout the year up to 
Dec. 31, 1945. Three posted cards 
will be furnished with each name. 
Additional cards can be purchased 
at the rate of 3 cards for 10c. 



MRS. EDYTHE AMBURGET 

Announces the opening of 

Margaret's Beauty Shop] 

at their home 
618 Dixie Highway, Erlanger 

Permanents $5.00 op 

Cold Wave 

Permanent $10.00 up 

Make appointments early. 

Operators: ^ 
Margaret Brumback and 
Edythe Amburgey 



^J 1 1 ■ f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 • 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1^ 



! 



WASHERS REPAIRED I 

AUTHORIZED MAYTAG SERVICE 

MAYTAG OIL — V-BELTS 
' All Size Wringer Rolls For All Makes 

I WM, HAGEDORN 

856* Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. 1 
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mi: 




pllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllH 



C^ft 




ERS & GRUBBS OFFER 



A service which the older residents of Boone County have 
known and respected fox almost half a century— and which 
newcomers may call with a feeling of definite assurance. 



. ■ " ^B 

I Chambers & Grubbs ! 



etucki 



AD laaOnff bread* V. 8. 

Appeared. Blood-te«t«l. •tmrt.d ehlcto one, two and 

rHEECATAL(fc,W r ri"." kHmTUCKY HATCHERY 

SS7 WEOT JTOUBTH STRUT • IXIINUTON. SJUTUCKT 




fT7NZRAL DIRECTORS 



WALTON 852 
llllllllllllllllltlllllllilllllllllllll] 






n * 



BRING YOJJR 

CHICKENS 

AND 

TURKEYS 

TO 

SCHMIDT'S 
Regal Store 

AT 

1100 PIKE STREET 

COVINGTON 

For Full Price and Honest 

Weight 

Will contract for your holiday 
poultry now. 



NOTICE 



Bids for caretaker of County In- 
firmary will be received by the 
Boone Fiscal Court on or before 12 
o'clock noon March 3, IMS. 

Successful bidder to execute bond 
In penal sum of $1000.00 and take 
charge of Infirmary May 1st, 1045. 

The court reserves the right to 
reject any or all bids. 

r. r> BENSON, Clerk. 
35-2t-c Boone Fiscal Court. 



—COVINGTON— 

ARMY STORE 

V. S. WAR DEPARTMENT 
CERTIFICATION OF 
AUTHORITY AG-095 

Military Accessories 

Insignia— Service 

Ribbons— Chevrons 

Patches 

Practical Needs 

—FOR— t 

Service Men 

PANTS — SHIRTS 

CAPS — BELTS 

SOX — TIES 

SWEATERS 

GLOVES — SCARFS 

Furlough Bags & Kits 

Shine & Sewing Kits 

Money Belts, Etc. 

I EF-KO 

ARMY 

-—STORE— 

508 Madison Ave. 
COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



FRAMES 

and MOUNTINGS 



A picture is not really com- 
plete until it is properly 
mounted or framed. Mount- 
ing not only protects the pic- 
ture but displays it to better 
advantage. 

You can get good frames at 
either of our studios at any 
time — but right now the 
prices on some types of 
frames have been greatly re- 
duced. 

Should you have a picture 
or any other article that 
should be protected or dis- 
played to better advantage 
bring it to us for framing. 



STEVENS 
STUDIOS 



804 Madison 
Covington 

HE. 8908 



639 Monmouth 
Newport 

HE. 9687 



"Good Portraits" 



liiihiiiimminiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiimii 

New James 

Theatre 

NEW SHOW TIME 

One Show Each Night at 7:3 CW T 

Sunday Matinee at 2:30 (CWT) 

Bargain Nights Monday & Thurs. 



Johnny Mack Brown, Raymond 
Hatton, in 

LAW MEN 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22ND 



Alan Ladd, Loretta Young, in 

AND NOW TOMORROW 

FRI. & SAT., FEBRUARY 23 & 24 



Monty Wooley, Jane Haver, in 

IRISH EYES ARE SMILING 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH 



Louise Allbritton, Robert Paige, 
Evelyn Ankers, in 

SON OF DRACULA 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26TH 



-NO SHOW 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH 



J. Carrol Naish, Ralph Morgan in 

THE MONSTER MAKER 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2kTH 
llllllimillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIII 




Improved 
uniform international 

StiNDAYl 
chool Lesson 

BY HAROLD L. LUNDQUIST. D. D. 

Oi, Ths Moody Blbls Institute ci Chlcaao. 

Released by Western Newspaper Union. 

Leason for February 25 

Lesson subjects and Scripture texts *a- 
lected and copyrighted by International 
Council of Religious Education; used by 

permission. * 



fry A Want Ad— They Sell RECORDER 1 TEAR $1.50 



JESUS, THE SON OF GOD 

i^aSON 1'jfiXT— Matthew 18:13-17: M:l-». 

GOLDEN TEXT — whosoever therefore 
■nail confess me before men. him will I 
confess also before my Father which is 
In heaven.— Matthew 10:32. 



"What think ye of Christ?" 

There is a question that every hu- 
man being must answer. Jesus 
asked it (Matt. 22:42), and each of 
us makes some kind of reply. 

It is the touchstone that tries men, 
and churches, organizations and 
movements. The answer to it is of 
deep importance, for it determines 
character, condition, and destiny for 
time and eternity. 

Jesus, the Christ, the Son of the 
living God, is the center of the en- 
tire lesson. 

I. Jesus Confessed (16:13-17). 

With His crucifixion now only six 
months away, our Lord in prepara-; 
tion for it is about to make a more 
definite claim to Messiahship, and 
thus to establish the truth in the 
minds of His disciples. He therefore 
asks this all - important question 
about Himself. 

First, it is a general query, 
"Whom do men say that I am?" 
The answer (v. 14) indicates that the 
common opinion concerning Christ 
was a very high one. He had made 
an impression on the people of His 
time, and this has been true down 
through the ages. Even those who 
do not believe on Him admit that 
He was "the ideal representative 
and guide to humanity," or the per- 
son before whom "everyone would 
kneel." But beautiful tributes to His 
character and leadership are worse 
than meaningless unless they lead 
to a personal confession of Him as 
Lord and Saviour. , 

The question becomes personal as 
He asks, "Whom do ye say that I 
am?" That question no one can es- 
cape. We cannot .refuse to answer.* 
Neutrality is impossible. Whatever 
we do or say, or do not do or say, 
is a decision. 

Peter's answer is really the sum 
and substance of Christian doctrine. 
He recognized Him as the Messiah, 
the fulfillment of all Hebrew proph- 
ecy, and as the Son of the living 
God, the Redeemer and Saviour of 
men, the One in whom centers all 
Christian faith. 

U. Jesus Transfigured (17:1-3). 

As His amazed disciples looked 
on, the eternal, divine glory of the 
Son of God could no longer be hid- 
den by the human body and the 
humble garments of our Lord, and 
"His face did shine as the sun and 
His raiment was white as light." 

They saw their beloved Master 
now for what He really was, the Son 
of God. The testimony of Peter was 
no longer mere words, although ever 
so blessed. His speech had been 
confirmed by sight and they knew 
their Master as the Lord of glory. 

It is essential in both the life 
and service of a Christian that he 
clearly understand the truth about 
Christ, His person and His work. 
When that understanding is tied up 
with a personal vision of His glory, 
there is assurance and power. 

The want of such a vision explains 
the lack of zeal for soul-winning, the 
ineffectiveness of witness, the un- 
willingness to suffer or sacrifice for 
Christ's sake. "Where there is no 
vision, the people perish" (Prov. 29: 
18) for want of a witness concerning 
the Saviour. .■ 

HI. Jesus Triumphant (17:4-6). 

The crowning point of the trans- 
figuration came when the voice 
spoke out of the bright cloud and 
gave not only the Father's unqual- 
ified approval of Christ, but also His 
command that men should listen to 
Him and heed His message of re- 
demption. 

Note how this word of the Father 
completed the transfiguration. In 
itself it might have been likened to 
that which happened to Moses (Ex. 
34:29, 30). We say likened to, be- 
cause the glory which showed forth 
in Jesus was from within, not just 
a reflected glow. 

But the words from heaven pro- 
vide the conclusive and final wit- 
ness, They so impressed Peter that 
he talked of them as a cherished 
memory and a transforming 
power in his life, even when he was 
an old man (II Pet. 1:16-18). 

How do they impress you? Are you 
ready to acknowledge Jesus as the 
Christ, the Son of God, and take 
Him as your Saviour? 

IV. Jesus Only (17:7-9). 

Having seen Him in His glory, 
they now saw Him alone. True, the 
others had gone, but is there not also 
the thought that He, the blessed 
God, now filled the vision of their 
souls? 

Surely we find it right at hand to 
make that application to our own 
lives. When we really see Him as 
He is, then He fills our vision, and 
when He does that, we have reached 
real satisfaction of life. 

"Jesus only" is more than a mot- 
to or a theme for a song. It is the 
epitome of a life worth while. It 
makes one want to ask everyone, 
"DO you know Him?" Well, do you? 
If not, will you take Him as* your 
Saviour right now? . Christian, will 
you let Him fill your life? 



BULLITTSVILLE CHRISTIAN 
CHVRCR 

htiui. AiUitU,, ft». ......... 

Preaching 2nd and 4th Sundays 
at 11 a. m. and 8:00 p. m. 

Church School every Sunday at 
10 «. m. Ben Kottmyer, Supt. 



JUST ARRIVED . . . 

Just arrived two cars heavy field fence No. top and bot- 
tom and 11 filler, also No. 9 48-inch high and barb wire. 

Large shipment 5-V galvanized roofing; 2 -horse riding 
cultivators and mowing machines on hand. Steel is scarce don't 
wait too long. t ; ;.♦;,; 

. Large supply ground government wheat, salt, oyster shells 
'Hfflda full line of other feeds. 

Bi-Counjy Co-Op. Farm Bureau Association 



W. W. WOODWARD, Manager 



DEVON, KENTUCKY 



MAKE HOME REPAIRS HOW! 



— 



Quality ' 

Roofings 

Service 
. . . available without delay 

If 70u need roof repair., or am entiruly new roof, 
there is no government regulation that wiUfdelay 
the work. We have available ample stock of CAREY 
Asphalt Shingles, your assurance of prompt service 
and the biggest roof value to be had anywhere. 
Call us, or come in about your roofing needs. We 
handle all details. No red tapa, * 

•Buy WAR BONDS 

and STAMPS _ 7\ 

Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 



219 CRESCENT AVENUE 



Erlanger 




CONTINUOUS SERVICE SINCE 1890 

Erlanger Perpetual Building 
and Loan Association 



ERLANGER, 




MEMBER 

EDERAL HOME 

t^NKSYSTT 



EL0a$> 



KENTUCKY 



We will be glad to explain our direct reduction 
Loan plan to you, which includes taxes and in- 
surance in monthly payments. 

3% INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS 



NORRIS BROCK 
CO. 

Cincinnati Stock Yards. 
Live Wire and Progres- 
sive organization, sec- 
ond to none. We are 
strictly sellers on the 
best all around market 
in the country. We 
hope yon will eventual- 

SERVICE that SATISFIES £ow? p £f£Je? y 22 

the first man you meet. 




Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

FULL CREDIT 



given on 



ALL BURIAL ASSOCIATION POLICIES 

I TALIAFERRO FUNERAL HOME 



H Phone ERL. 87 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii 



Ambulance Service 
IIIIIIIIIIIHIIIH 



A PLEDGE OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

that leaves behind memories of enduring beauty. 

TO EXTEND TO ALL ALIKE, regardless of how modest or how 

elaborate a funeral may be, a capable and sympathetic service 

THARP dt STITH 

FUNERAL HOME 

AMBULANCE PHONE 

SERVICE FLORENCE 13 



■ ■ ' 






THE BOONE COUNTY RSOOBDEB, BVKUNGTON, KENTUCKY 



**. 



AK¥ », 



\ 



WAYNE FEEDS! 

DAIRY — HOG — CHICKEN 

32% $3.35 EGG MASH IN $^.85 

24% 3.20 PRINT BAGS * 

16% 2.85 tlse mash, then make 

Topper . 2.60 pretty dress from sack. 

40% Hog Supplement $4.15 

35% Pig and Hog Supplement ....". 4.05 

Pig and Sow Meal 3.80 

Wayne Chick Starter 4.30 

Wayne Broiler Ration 4.15 

Wayne Grower ........; 4.00 

Wayne Flushing Mash , 5.75 

25 Lb. Bag Wayne Flushing Mash 1.55 

We handle a full line of WAYNE FEEDS . 
We Also Handle all Raw Materials 

COLONIAL 

COAL and SUPPLY COMPANY 
Dixie 7720 - Dixie 7721 Erlanger, Ky. 



— — 



BELLEVIEW 

Mr. ttnd Mrs. H. R. Hensley and 
daughter of Fort Thomas spent 
Monday with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. R. B. Hensley. / 

Mrs. Bud Burcham and family 
called on Mrs. Sherman Burcham 
and daughter-Monday. v 

Mr. and Mis. Russell Rogers and 
daughter were shopping in Coving- 
ton, Tuesday. 

•* Miss Mary Lou Abdon of Mc- 
Villc spent Thnmday night with 
Miss Loretta Snellmg. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rogers are 
visiting his sister, Mrs. Dorotha 
Aylor of Chicago. __ — _ 

Wm. Rogers, Sr., has been oh the 
sick list for several weeks. 

Harold Aylor, of Cincinnati and 
Wilbur Aylor, Huntington, W. Va., 
were called to the bedside of their 
mother, Mrs. Alice Aylor, who was 
stricken with pneumonia. 

Mrs. Hilda Sebree and children 
spent several days last week with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wu)ard 
Ryle. j"- V 

Mrs. Herman Smith received 
word one day last week that her 
husband Sgt. Herman Smith has 
been reported missing In action. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wiltard Ryle and 
daughter, Mrs. Herman Smith vis- 
ited Mr. and Mrs. Claude Smith, of 
Rising Sun, Tuesday. 

Miss Willa Deck jroent the week- 
end with Miss RulErjrityle, of East 
Bend. 

Mrs. Louvette Rogers spent sev- 
eral days with her sister in Cincin- 
nati, last week. 

Mrs. Lou Maurer entertained the 
G. A.'s with a Valentine party on 
Tuesday night. 

Quite a few from here attended 



the ball game at Burlington, Fri- 
day evening. 

Mrs. Chrlstena Kirtley is staying 
with Mrs. William Rudicill, of Bur- 
lington. 

Mrs. Charley Brown and daugh- 



ter were shopping in Cincinnati, 
Thursday. 

Mrs. Janey Ames and daughter 
and Mrs. Aline Brady - were shop- 
ping in Cincinnati, Friday. 

Leland R. Clore returned home 




^ For Sale By 

The Boone-Kenton Lumber Co. 

ERLANGER KENTUCKY 



£HXHXHXHXHXHX*XHXHXHXHXIIXK 

NEW and CLEAN 



Used Furniture 




H 

X 

Madison Furniture i 
Store | 

432-434 Madison Ave. 
Covington, -:- Kentucky ■ 

ISMS 



X 
M 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
H 
X 
I 

SxHXHSHXHXHXHXHXHXHXHXMl 




AS I HAVE RENTED MY FARM, I WILL SELL AT PUBLIC 
AUCTION AT MY PLACE KNOWN AS THE CARPENTER 
FARM, LOCATED 1 MILE NORTH OF UNION JUST OFF U. 
S. 42 ON 

SAT., MARCH 3 



: 



i 



Beginning at 1 :00 P. M. 



THE FOLLOWING: 



LIVE STOCK — Two cows to freshen in spring; 7 heifers; pair' 
of black mares, 5 and 6 years old. _ 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS-rJohn Deere mowing machine; 1 
Fordson tractor; 1 heavy duty trailer; wheelbarrow; 7 contract- 
or's jacks; tool boxes, brooder stove; 1 set of harness; 2 new 
collars; 2 bridles and set of lines; 4 forks; and a lot of small tools 
too numerous to mention. 

TOBACCO— Approximately 800 sticks of tobacco hanging in 
barn. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE— Heating stove, good as new; 
Favorite cooking range; white breakfast set; white kitchen cab- 
inet; single bed, springs and mattress; studio couch; library 
table; 2 small end tables,* and One good living room suite. 



: 



TERMS: CASH 



*' 



X 

U 




Bradford and Duncan, Auctioneers 



>•* 



i 



Baby Clucks 

PULLORUM TESTED 

Purina Feeds - Poultry, Hog, Dairy 

Metal Feeders and Fountains 

Electric Brooders Oil Drum Brooders 



Baled Straw, Peat Moss, Serval Litter 
25% Deposit on All Chicks Sent Parcel Post 

Orders placed now on chicks will assure you of 
early delivery 

CHECKER BOARD SEED 

Pollitt's Chick $ Feed Store 

215 Dixie Highway Erlanger, Ky. 

Phone Dixie 7785 



Wednesday from Key We»t Naval 
Hospital, after receiving a medical 
discharge. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. 8. Hensley soent 
Sunday with Mr: and Mrs. tt R. 
Hensley and daughter, off WtL 
Thomas. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rogers 8r., 
and family spent Sunday with Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Rogers, Jr., and 
daughter. 

Mutt Rogers and wife spent sev- 
eral days last week with his 




C. S. Bidden, of 

the Sunday aft- 

©f Mr. and Mrs. 



Aylor 



No charch services wtti be held 
at Constance Christian Church a»- 
tll further notice, dne to the in 
health of Rev. A. Tipton. 



Used Cars 

MANY ARE GUARANTEED! 

'36 CHEV. Vi TON PANEL TRUCK 255.00 

1936 TERRAPLANE 4-DOOR 200.00 

'34 CHVEROLET COACH 175.00 

'40 DODGE TUDOR 963.00 

'37 BUICK SEDAN , 560.00 

'36 DODGE COUPE 350.00 

'34 NASH SEDAN 150.00 

'37 TERRAPLANE COACH 295.00 

'39 HUDSON COACH 695.00 

And Many Other Low-Price Cars 

H. R. BAKER MOTORS 

20 East 4th St. Covington COlonial 3884 



VISIT 

DIXIE DRY GOODS 

SATE ON OUR 

EBRUARY CLEARANCE 

SALE! 

HERE ABE A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS 

ONE LOT OF MEN'S DRESS SHIRTS $ J .39 
All colors and sizes. $1.98 value for. * 

MEN'S WORK SOX £ 15c 

CHILDREN'S PRINT DRESSES CTflr 

Sizes 1 to a — a to 6\. <%#W 

LADIES' COTTON HOSE ......25c 

LADIES' BEDROOM SLIPPERS 89c 

LADIES' RAYON HOSE ..36c 

81x90 SHEETS special $1.79 

40-INCH MUSLIN 19c 

12-FOOT AAA BLUEGRASS TOBACCO $Q-<W 

CANVAS .....per 100 yds. • 

BUILT-UP SHOULDER SLIPS 75c 

Reg. size 65c .exti^a size ■ **• 

LADIES' COTTON PRINT DRESSES 1.69 - 1.98 

DIXIE DRY GOODS CO., INC. 

On The Highway - ERLANGER 




Serve America 



STAY ON YOUR WAR JOB 

—as our fighting men do! 



The men who are fighting (and dying) 
for us on far battlefields can't quit now 
and start looking for post-war posi- 
tions! The very least we can do is to 
keep at our essential war jobs, tiaramer- 
and-tongs, until Hitler's cruel machine 
is smashed, and the Rising Sun is sunk 
for keeps. Don't let our f~ r :ters down! 



See America Later 




■; 




YOU'LL ENJOY IT MORE 
— if JW help win Victory! 



.'■•■'> 

-i — I—, 



This America of ours is a vast treasure 
land of beauty, whose riches are best 
and moat Intimately explored by high- 
way. With fine new Super-Coaches, 
new comfort features, new carefree 
tours, Greyhound will re-introduce 
Americans to the land they love — 
when Victory comes. 



%, 






<s 



<S 



OSBORN'S DEPARTMENT STORE 



Phone Florence 133 



Florence, Ky. 



^ 







— 



V 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, ■J B flMUM 




*•+•»••••••••• 



POULTRY EQUIPMENT 

SUPPLIES 

OIL and ELECTRIC 
BROODERS 




/•-' 



METAL FEEDS - WATER 
FOUNTAINS 

POULTRY REMEDIES 

FUL-O-PEP and DR. HEINZ 

NU-WAY FEEDS 



D13 




512 Pike 



Cvvlnfton, Ky. 



HE. 910ft Open DaUy tOl 7 pom. 



*c 



FLORENCE 



Mrs. Jennie Dobbins spent last 
Thursday with Mrs. Sam Cummins 

nf FrlfiLrK?6T 

John FWmer, of Uuttfcendenle, son had for their gueate on Friday 



and brother Petty Officer Fred 
Fohner from overseas who Is spend- 
ing a 30-day furlough with home 
folks, were calling on their aunt, 
Mrs. Jennie Dobbins, Saturday aft- 
ernoon. V 

J. T. Stephenson.wtta^ and son 
entertained with a family dinner 
party last Sunday. 

R. E. Tanner, who has been ill 
for two weeks is improving, we are 
glad to report. 

Guests of Mrs. Ben Northcutt on 
Wednesday afternoon were Mrs. 
Jennie Dobbins and Mrs. Jeffa Os- 
tein. 

Mrs. Eldrid'ge Carpenter called 
on her aunt, Mrs. Jennie Dobbins, 
Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Zeffa Osborn was the guest 
of Mrs. Chas. McKinley, of Erlang- 
er, last Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Garnett were 
dinner guests Sunday, evening of 



his son Bud and wife, of Ludlow, 

W. T. Dugan, of, CarroUton was 
a welcome visitor here Friday, call- 
ing on friends, jft'frioaaa ..'.;.■;.: 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Otephen- 



aftemoon, Mr. and Mrs, Sidney 
Ambrose, of Francesville. i i 

Ooebel Stephenson has returned 
from a' business trip to Irvine, Ky. 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell House have 
returned home after enjoying a 
ten-day visit with relatives and 
friends in Plant City, Fla. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Houston and 
sons Danny and George and Miss 
Gertrude * Meiman weir dinner 
guests on Sunday evening of Mrs. 
Betty Houston and son, of Coving- 
ton. 

A large number of folks, from this 
locality attended the sale of A. G. 
McMullen on Friday afternoon. 

Friends of Frank Hammond will 
be glad tolearn that he is recup- 
erating fro nTa r eca nt illness. 

Miss Gertrude Meiman is return- 
ing to the San Fernando Valley, 
California, where she has been 
making her home for the past five 



• 



Lowest Cash Prices In Town 

ON MATTRESSES, FLOOR COVERINGS 

Mattresses, Floor Coverings, Stoves, Rugs, Furniture Odd Pieces 
50 Lb. All Felt Mattress $10.98 



Felt Daven- 
port Mattress 
$5.98 
50 Lb. 
Cotton 
Mattress 
$8.98 
27x36 
Jute Rugs 

69c 

Enamelware 

Dish Pans 

85c 



12-Piece 

WALNUT 

BEDROOM 

SUITE 

. $139.00 
llllll 



Felt Day Bed 
Mattress 

$8.98 

Baby Crib 

Mattress 

$3.98 

Rubberized 

Crib 

Mattress 

$6.98 
Linoleum 

Mats 
35c Each 



We have any size linoleum rugs— Gold Seal & Armstrong Quaker 

J. A. BAUMGARTNER 



21 Pike St. and 24 W. 7th 



Covington, Ky, 



Next Door to Geo. W. Hill, Grocer 



|GEO.W.HILL&COJ 

ANOTHER BIG 



YEAR 




BIGGEST 
FOOD IN OUR 
CHALLENGES 



DEMAND FOR 
HISTORY 
EVERY 



FARMER . . . 



.* i 



I 



PLAN NOW 

Send for our 
complete list. 
Post card will 
do, with your 
name and ad- 
dress. a . 
Price LM By 
Return Sfail 
" ■ ■■ 



SEEDS 



i< 






best for Held and garden 



Fresh, New Seed, tried and proven, high in 
germination and parity, best results as- 
sured. Modern laboratories of experienced 
seed analysts put Hills Dixie Brand Seeds 
through the acid test an,d put their gtdmp 
of approval on them. Make this year your 
most profitable! ,. ^ ; ( . 



DR. SALESBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES AND 
DR. HESS PTZ POWDER AND PELLETS 

' . ■ ' ' ; ■ 

Sinre Mififi 

ILL 

AND 

COMPANY 

SEEDSMEN SINCE 1863 




M-M W. 



25-29 PIKE 
RTRFFT 



COVINGTON, KKNi'tlCAi 



y»oj» ( »«Ar a visit, here amnntr her 
family, relatives and friends, her 
father, John Meiman and brother, 
Mr: 'and Mrs. Joe Meiman, of Flor- 
ence, Mr. and Mrs. John Meiman, 
Jr., of Covington. 

Pvt. Leroy Garnett and wife are 
receiving congratulations over .he 
arrival of a little son, at Booth 
Hospital. The father has been over- 
seas about three weeks. Mrs. Gar- 
nett is making her home with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell of 
Price Pike for the duration. 

Sympathy is extended to thet, 
family of Jeff Eddins, who passed 
away at his home in Burlington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Houston and 
sons entertained Tuesday, their 
daughter-in-law Mrs. Robert Hous- 
ton and daughter of Covington. 

Pvt. Edgar Allen McCardle has 
left for California, after enjoying 
a 15-day furlough here with rela- 
tives. , 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Markesbery 
and sons called on Mr. and Mrs. W. 
S. Worthington and son of Dixie 
Highway on Sunday afternoon. 

Miss Clara Mae Cook, of Coving- 
ton spent the week-end with her 
cousin, Miss Sarah Cook. 



UNION 



J. C. Piatt Is enjoying a protract- 
ed visit with relatives In Madison, 
Ind. -~^~ 



GASBURG 

Mr. and Mrs. John' Burns were 
shopping in Aurora, last Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Klopp and 
daughter were the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles White and fami- 
ly Tuesday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Baker and 
Mr. Attison Wolfe were Thursday 
evening guests of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
E. Klopp and son. 

Mrs. Nat Rogers called on Mrs. 
Forest Brown and her house guest 
Mrs. Jennie Rogers one afternoon 
last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lanehart have gone 
to housekeeping on Mr. and Mrs. 
B. C. Stephens' farm. 

Stanley Smith was shopping in 
Aurora, Friday. 

Mrs. Nat Rogers was shopping in 
Aurora, Thursday. 

Paul G. Leek spent the week-end 
with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Klopp and 
son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ovit Webster are 
entertaining her brother Mr. Web- 
ster and Mrs. Webster and chil- 
dren. 

There are quite a few on the sick 
list. They are Mrs. Stanley Smith 
and son John, Mrs. Ralph Mont- 
gomery and children and Mr. Em- 
bry Klopp, Miss Mary Besss Burns 
and Edwin Burns, 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Dunn have 
moved to the farm of Mr. and Mrs. 
Nat Rogers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Wolfe and 
Miss Faye were Saturday evening 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Embry 
Klopp. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. u O. Rector spent 
Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. 
Klopp 

Mr and Mrs. H. E. Arnold called 
on Mrs. Elizabeth Keim, recently. 

The two sons of Mr, and Mrs. 
Allen Burcham have been ill the 
past week. , . 

Mrs. Nat Rogers was the Friday 
afternoon guest of Mrs. Hugh 
Arnold. 

Mrs. Chas. White and daughter 
attended the service board dedica- 
tion of the Christian Church Sun- 
day evening. 



Mr. and -lira. Raymond Newman 
entertained, over the week-end 
Rev. Henry Beach and Mrs. Beach, 
of Louisville. 

Pvt. Harry Wilbur Craddock ar- 
rived Tuesday from Camp Wheeler, 
Ga., for a two weeks* furlough with 
his family. • ■* ' ** 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hicks, Mrs. 
Walter Ferguson were Sunday 
night dinner guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Robert Huey. , 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. M. 
Stephenson, a daughter, Thursday, 
February 15th at Booth Hospital, 
Covington. 

Miss Sue Allison Greenup Is ill 
and confined to her home with flu. 

Mrs. Herbert Anderson and Mrs. 
Ed Grater entertained a group of 
friends with bridge Friday night 
at the Anderson residence. The 
guests at this very pleasant affair 
were: -Mesdames Harvey Hicks, 
Tom Robert Huey, Walter Fergu- 
son, Malone Ligon, Elmer Noe and 
Harry W. Craddock! 




m 



The BeHeview Baptist W. M. S. 
held their regular meeting at the 
hctonV bt Mrs. Etna McNeely, on 
Wednesday afternoon, February 7. 
Thirteen members answered 
call. 



CONGRATULATIONS 



Feed sacks are being . used by 
Hart county homemakers for closet 
accessories, such as laundry bags, 
shoe bags and shoulder protectors. 



Mrs. .Bess Simmons Liggett is 
spending a month's vacation with 
friends in Ft. Myer, Fla. 

Mrs. WV H. Doane has returned 
from a week's visit in, Covington 
with her daughter, Mrs. Clifford 
Fisk. 

The many friends of Mfs. Maggie 
Ross Clarkson regret to know that 
she has been confined to her bed 
for several weeks with an Injured 
knee. 

Sgt. Janies Robert Wilson and 
Mrs. Wilson are here from Kearns, 
Utah, for a few weeks with their 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Holtz- 
worth and Miss Nancy Lynn Wil- 
son. 

Master Tom Matson Huey has 
returned to school following a ten- 
day illness with flu. 

Mrs. Ben S. Houston entertained 
with a six o'clock dinner Wednes- 
day night complimenting Mrs. B. 
L. Cleek, Mrs. Harvey Hicks, Mrs. 
B. L. Norman, Mrs. Walter Fergu- 
son, Mrs. Tom Robert Huey and 
Mrs. Ed Grater. The dinner was 
served by Mr* L. R. Barlow, who 
on this occasion, upheld her well 
known reputation for excellent 
food. 

Pvt. William jGreenup, stationed 
at Camp KnoX, spent the past 
week-end at his home in the vil- 
lage. /* 

Mrsf Robert Qreen and Mrs. Em- 
erson Smith were in Burlington 
Tuesday to see their uncle, J. E. 
Gaines, who is gravely ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Anderson's 
small daughter, Miss Penny And- 
erson is home from a week-end 
visit with friends in Covington. 

Bunny and Bruce Ferguson, 
students at Holmes High, Coving- 
ton, spent the week-end with their 
mdther, Mrs. Walter Ferguson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andy Holtzworth 
spent Thursday with their kindred 
the R. E. Tanners. Mr. Tanner's 
many friends will be glad to know 
that he is nicely convalescent from 
an attack of pneumonia ~at the 
family residence on Highway 42. 

Mrs. Maggie C. Wilson is home 
from a visit of two weeks in Cov- 
ington with her daughter, Mrs. 
Bert Ross and Mr. Ross. 

Communion services were held 
Sunday at Union and Richwood 
Presbyterian Churches. Rev. Edwin 
Rock of Louisville, was guest 
speaker. 



CELEBRATES GOLDEN 

WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis M. Stephens 
celebrated tbelr golden wedding 
anniversary February 13, at their 
home on Rising Sun-Aurora road. 
Children and grandchildren, as 
well as many friends and other rel- 
atives called throughout the day to 
offer their congratulations. 

Martha J. Conley and Lewis M. 
Stephens, both natives of Kentucky 
were married Feb. 18, 1895 at Er- 
langer, Ky., by Rev. Edgar Step- 
hens. They came to Indiana in 
1902 and since have been residents 
of . that place. Mr. Stephens has 
reached his 71st year and his bride 
of fifty years ago is now 67. 

Their three children, Mrs. George 
Parker, Mrs. Clayton Monroe and 
Wayman Stephens and four grand- 
children assisted with the celebra- 
tion marking their golden jubilee. 



Congratulations are being receiv- 
ed by Mr. and Mrs. Lewis G. Kress 
of Louisville, Ky., on the arrival of 
a son, Stanley Paul, born February 
roll 7, at the Kentucky Baptist Hospital 
in Louisville. 

The meeting opened by singing The parents also have a three- 
"Forward Baptist Comrades." Pray- year-old daughter, Marilyn Elaine 
er by Mae Sandford. Alline Brady Kress. 

, presented a program from Royal Mr. Kress is the son of Mr. John 
Service with the topic of "Mlsr Kress and the late Mrs. Margaret 
sions." Zora Scott, president, pre- Dolwick Kress of Constance and 
sided at the business session. • Ludlow. Mrs. Kress Is the daugh- 
Readlng the minutes and treas- ter of Mrs. Anna Barbara Harsln 
urer's report and reports from the and the late Mr. Albert Harsln, of 



i 



committees were heard. 

The W. M. S. is sponsoring a 
series of prayer meetings In the 
homes In behalf of the soldier boys 
this yea/. > 

The next meeting will be an all- 
day session at the, home bf Mrs. 
Florence McArthur, March 7th. 

The meeting closed with prayer 
by Mrs. Laura Clore. 
. M. C. Sandford, Sec'y. 



CarroUton, Ky. 




tice: 



The Walton Packing Co., of Wal- 
ton, Ky., is now Teady to sign con- 
tracts for tomatoes grown in 1945. 



>y 



PRICE 



$24.00 



PER TON 



mini .' 



Help produce this important 1&x< 
crop. 

You may secure your contracts 
from the plant in" Walton* Ken- 
tucky. 



The Wdtcn Packing Go. 



TO DARVILLE LEE 

Our precious little darling, 

We miss you so down here, 
But then we know that where you 
are 

There Is no pain nor fear. 
But oh! there's such a longing 

For those precious little arms 
And tears and smiles and gurlings 

This made this a happier home. 
We would not ask for you back, 
dear one, 

Although we miss you so, 
For now heaven is happier by far, 

And where we want to go. 
So we just pray that God will lead 

In His own gentle way, 
That we may* be true to Him— and 
we 

Will meet up there some day. 
— Mother. 



Charlle s Campbell of Bell county 
reported Sir fleck of 500 White 
Leghorns produced almost a case 
of eggs dally during December. 



UTILITIES COMPANY 

SPONSORS 4 H CLUBS 

The Kentucky Utilities Company, 
Lexington, is sponsoring a contest 
for more and better 4-H club wor£ 
in the 72 Kentucky counties which 
it serves. A cash award of $10 will 
be given to the champion club In 
each county, $25 to the highest 
scoring club in each of five dis- 
tricts and $50 to the club that 
makes the highest score in the 72 
counties- The contest started Jan. 
1 and will end Oct. 15. 



Several poultrymen in Butler 
county reported flocks producing 
better than average during the 
month ot, December. 



Try A Want Ad— They Sell 



JAMESWAp 

Metal 10 hole Chicken 

Nests $9.75 

Flock Feeders, on legs . . $4.50 
Flock Waterers . . , $4.75 

Galvanied chicken feed- 
ers, Galvanized chicken 
, water fonts. Farm fence 
and gates. Stewart Sheep 
shearing combs and cut- 
ters. 

JAMESWAY 

HAY TOOLS and BARN 
EQUIPMENT 

I. H. C. Farm Machinery and 
Repairs 

ZIMMER 

H A R I> W ARE CO. 

537-39 Pike St. Covington 
HEmlock 4741 



VICTROLAS 

WANTED 

CASH PAID 

HANSER MUSIC CO. 

540 Madison Covington HE. 7413 



AUCTION 



AT 2:00 P.M. 



LOCATION— TWO SQUARES OFF U. S. 2S ON KENTABOO 
DRIVE AT THE HOME OF THE LATE HATTIE LUCAS. WE 
HAVE LISTED WITH COL. WORTHINGTON TO SELL THE 
FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: 



HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN FURNITURE— One Good Will 
coal range, in good condition; 1 four-burner oil stove; 1 kitchen 
cabinet; dishes and pans; 2 sets of silverware; 1 dresser-chif- 
fonier; 2 bed and springs; - Philco radio; bedding and linens; 
one lot of antiques; also about 2 1 / 2 tons of coal; and many other 
articles too numerous to mention. 









Rose 



:••• 



an 



Administrator 






I 

■ 
• i 

I 

d| 

II 




* 



'• ' " '■ 



' 



" 



* 



11 



"—— - 



1 



^^m^ 




Se^\jAnd Wtrd Around 
The County Seat 



Hubert Brady was 111 over the 
week-end. 

, ( ,,Mr. Bert Oafaies te somewfcat im- 
proved this Week. 

Mrs. Lloyd Weaver was law to 
. «erve dinners Sunday, due rto a 
severe cold. j 



Mrs. Robert Utz, Mrs. Wendell 
Easton and Mrs. George Porter 
were shopping In Covington, Mon- 



day afternoon. 



\ 




Mrs. Jake Cook and Mrs. Lou 
Williamson, of Waterloo, called on 
Mrs. Rena Presser, last Friday. 

' ■' , r'Arwin rrQ i 

Mi. and Mrs. Stanley.,, Rylp,,jdf 

Louisville* spent the week-end with 

his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Manley 

Ryle. 

William Huey, who is stationed 
with the Seabees at Providence, R. 
I„ returned to camp Thursday, 
after spending a ten-day furlough 
with his wife, here. 




MXMXI 

JUST THINKING 

When you are 111 you think of your doctor, 
When you need groceries you think of your grocer, 
When you need legal advice you think of your lawyer, 
When you want to know the news you think of your newspaper, 
When you have money or need money we like to have you think 
of this bank. 
WE ARE AS MUCH INTERESTED IN YOUR SUCCESS 
AS WE ARE IN THE SUCCESS OF OUR OWN BUSINESS. 
MAY WE HELP YOU? 

jj Peoples Deposit Bank f 

burlington.'kentucky * 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 5 

Capital $50,000.00 Surplus $150,000.00 jj 

^M»HXH«HXHXH«H«WTHXH«HXH«H«H«HXH»HXHXH«HZHXHIH«HXH«K 



ifary Frances, - dsugteter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Luther Smith has been 
quite ill for; the part **#* days. '■■• 

Mrs. Orville Sebree and two chil- 
dren ate visiting her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Willard Ryle, of Belleview. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kirtley Cropper 
and family entertained Mr. W- L. 
Cropper and Miss Mary Bess Crop- 
per at dinner, last Friday evening. 



Miss MaW jflWSs spent Mon- 
day with Mrs. Ed Hawes, of Cov- 



= 



ihgtoft. 



Miss Geraldine 
Christ Hospital 
week. 







. — 



Mr and Mrs. William Huey were 
dinner guests lasVWednesday even- 
ing of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence 
White, of Hyde Park. 



' i 




ft 



-# 



^t^wFAKM-MASTER 



MU:V4» 



supplies m 



j?M»MtM!IMrM1MV''' 



'Mm^MWMM 




Women in Service Work 
Applaud these St) 

And no wonder! They're so trim and business-like for your 
hours on duty . . . feminine and flattering for your gala even- 
ings! Get your go-everywhere hairstyle today! 

A LaRose Permanent will make it last and last 

RESTYLING-CUT, SHAMPOO-SET $2.00 

LaRose Beauty Salon' 

400 DIXIE HIGHWAY ERLANGER, KY. 

Phone Erlanger 6252— Virginia Cbllinjs, Prop. 




The Home Store 

IIIIIIIIIIIIHdlllllllllllMlirilUIIIIIIIUIIUIIHIUIIIIlfllilllllllUI^IIIIIIIIIMMMIIMI 

ORDER Y.OUR REQUIREMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL 

FERTILIZER NOW! 

WE WILL HAVE OUR NEW CROP GRASS SEED ABOUT FEB- 

1— BOOK TOUR ORDER NOW! 



— 







• ■ 






^ ^BACOO SEED 

STAFFORD'S SPECIAL ORIGINAL LONG LI 

GOLDEN BURLEY ..1 oi. 11.50 

BELL'S BOURBON WHITE BURLEY, a smoker from 

bottom to top; root-rot resistant tobacco seed 1 ox. $1.50 

NO. 16. WHITE BURLEY CERTIFIED SEED 1 oz. fl.50 

WARNER'S GOLDEN BURLEY 1 ox. $1.50 

NO, 33 WHITE BURLEY WILT RESISTANT SEED' 4 .' ox. fl.50 



PENETRO COLD SALVE 25c and 60c 

ST. JOSEPH COD LIVER OIL ..'..*... pt. $ 1.00 



PENETRO NOSE DROPS 



...... 



..... 



.25c and 50c 



PENORUB FOR COLDS ". . -35c 

LANDFORD COUGH MEDICINE 25c 

PENETRO BABY COUGH DROPS .25c 

LISTERINE ANXISEiXIC/ £oc 

• • • . 35C 



ST. JOSEPH ASPIRIN 

AIjIvA seltzer 



FLETCHER S C ASTORIA ....••••.•••••••••« 

10c, 20c and 35c 
...» :89c. and 60c 

BROIViO SELTZEK ••••'•••«•••■••••••••••••• .y* •*■•••••• wliC 

LANDFORD COLD TABLETS 10c 

PENETRO QUININE TABLETS FOR COLD ... 25c 

GROVES' COLD TABLETS 25c 

STANBACK HEADACHE POWDERS, 6 dozes t . pkg. 10c 

^JEEN-A-MINTS 16 tablets 25c 

CARTER'S LITTLE LITER PILLS : 25c 

»>>ANACIN TABLETS, Relieves Pain .box 25c 

jjSAFETY KIT, With gauze dispenser :..15c 

''VlCK'S SALVE •'. .... . *■ 30c 

PENETRO INHALER for head cold ... .25c 

RUBBING ALCOHOL -/. .«* .pt. 30c 



GULLEY & PETTIT 



I 






JL 



VFRrTHING FO SPEED PROFITABLE 



PRODUCTION 




500-Chick Electric Brooder 



Low Operation Cost! 

Meets all REA specifications. Big 48x72- 
inch rust-resisting steel canopy Masonite 
insulation. Automatic temperature regu- 
lator and heating element guaranteed for 
3 years. Fully enclosed 1,000-watt heating 
element. 



33 



.95 




Farm-Master Oil Brooder 



Wickless burner guaranteed 5 years! Large 
— holds 400 six-week-old chicks. Econom- 
ical—burns about 3 gallons cheap fuel oil 
or kerosene daily. Thermostat. Automatic 
draft regulator. Six-gallon tank. 



■ s 



Form-Master 
Baby Chicks 

Deposit 
Per 100 



Now assures you delivery of 
Sears quality chiaks in the 
breed you want and as near 
the date specified as possi- 
ble. $12 for 100. 




■o-T 




Sun ray Mesh 
, Weather-Protection 



Sq. Yd. 

„ hotbeds, porches 

windows, storn, 

Cellophane, reinforced 

y<i-inch mesh. 36 inches 




wide. 



11 -In. Chick Feeder 

Strong, galvanized steel. Re- 
movable sliding top. fC* 
Easily filled and cleaned. ■»« 




/■■■K 




t. -f|.> t\ £<8 OJ 
In. Chick Feeder 

Galvanized steel. Feeds 50 
three-week-old chicks. 4-vane 
metal reel prevents QQn 

roosting "Do 



GitifTu/ickate 

TOTALING $10 OR MORI 
CAN BE MADE ON 



EASY PAYMENT 
^ PLAN * / 



Poultry 
Fountoin 



3-gallon. Dou- 
ble wall vacu- 
um feed type 
of galvanized 
steel. 5-gallon, 
2.49. 





id H. oevciUit 



lyOvui 6 i,oii 



liiu. L\ty,4 



ka, of Lou- 
Mrs. J. B 
week-end 



second wedding 
and Mrs. Walton, 
of friends and 
extend best 



Miss Betty Lou B^Uyf^of Louis- 
ville, spent the week-end with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Kelly. 



*■- 



Mrs. Lou Maurw.'of BelleYlew f** o&asion 
was visiting her sister, Mrs. Grace 
Rio/, last Friday. 




Farm MrtM 
WHI Be Hi 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe Huey, Mr. and The Second Annual Tana Bu- 
Mrs. Wendell Easton, Mrs. Robert jreau banquet will be held at Bur- 
Utz and Mrs. Otis Rouse were din- j lington achool at 7:80 p. m. Friday 
ner guests of Mr. and Mrs. George night, according to waive* JMug, 

preaidenc. iMs will v»tM*My be 

the biggest farmers' apeaking 

meeting to be held durin* the year. 

Farmers and thlr wives expeet- 



Porter, last Tuesday. 



Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Setters 
and Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Dawson, of 

Butler, Ky.; were week-end guests 1n g to attend the meeting are urged 
of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. to leave their reservations at any 



Orover Setters. 



William Finn, of Washington, D. 
C, was m Burlington, Monday 
evening shaking hands with old 



one of the county agricultural of' 
floes In Burlington not later than 
Thursday at noon. The P.-T. A. 
will charge for all" reservations 
made and every effort wUl be made 



friends and schoolmates. Bill was to take care of all who want to at- 



enroute to Lexington where he will 
spend two days in the interest of 
AAA. 



William Finn, of Washington, D. 
C, visited his brother Russell and 
family over the week-end. Other 
guests were Aubrey and John Finn, 
Mr. and Mrs. Russell Finn, Jr., Mrs. 
Roscoe Curtis and Miss Louise Mc- 
Arthur. Sunday afternoon callers, 
were Mr. and Mrs. Ott Rector and 
daughter Mary, of Petersburg. 



tend. Banquet tickets are $1.00 
per plate. 

Mrs. Alan Wilson, secretary o! 
the Associated Women vt Kentucky 
Farm Bureau Federation and Ru-f 



fry A #«■* AeV- Tney Sell 



JUST 



ENAMELWARE 



• •Cap 

• Dish Pa 

• Double SUtWu* 



• e-e«i.KatOM 



I 



32- Pc. Breakfast Set 
All White China .... 



yl 



PAT'S CHINA STORE 

Also Location of 
GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

7St Madison Cov. 



Electric Supplies! 



On Saturday evening, Feb. 17th, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Walton, of Heb- 
ron were honor guests at a re- 
ception and buffet supper given by 
their son and daughter, Iieland 
Walton and Mrs. Franklin Judy, 

jmiih ||||||||jnilllllllllllllllllllllllj 

| HORSES I 

—AND— 

| MULES j 

FOR SALE 

AT ALL TIMES 

2J mm 

E All horses and mules guar- : 
j anteed as represented. 

| Ralph Jones | 

NEW LOCATION 



BURLINGTON-TDLEWILD | 
ROAD 
■ formerly Geo. Kreylich farm Ej 

BURLINGTON, KY., R. 1 § 
Tel. Burl. 175 

FTtn 1 1 ii i ■ ii i ■ ■ ii mi >iiii 1 1 1 1 1 jim i ii m ■ mrr 






'V 



« 



. 



Pin Up Lamps 

Desk Lamps 

Bed Lamps 

Porch Lights 

Dry Cell Batteries 

Wristlites 

Flood Spot Lights 

Electric Water 

Pumps & Heaters 

R. E. A. Wiring 

Switches - Boxes 

Wiring Devices 

Bells & Buzzers 

Transformers 

Lamp - BeU Wire 

A. B. Don Cords 
Don, Toaster and 

Heater Elements 

FIXTURES FOB 
EVERY ROOM. 



Bluegrass Supply Co. 

(FORMERLY LAVANIER SUPPLY CO.) 

PLUMBING '•/ '- ' ' ' BLBCTBJC 

121 Pike Street Covington HEmlock 572S 



PUBLIC 



I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON MY FARM LO- 
CATED AT LIMABURG, UP CREEK ROAD, KNOWN AS THE 
JOHN AYLOR FARM, ON 






» ■ * • ' * 






FARM IMPLEMENT 



itKCTNNING AT 12 O'CLOqggTOfgjgCWT) 

-1 Box bed T$B*; 1. M bed; 1 mow- 
ing machine; one 60-tooth smooth havA; lVHrnatioBal cult- 
ivator; 1 John Deere turning plow; IJHotch Sipper turning 
plow; 1 wheat drill; 1 Gayle 3-horse «Hhii# |ibw ; 1 double 
shovel plow; 1 Syracuse hillside plow;! small jumper plow; 1 
log chain; 1 crosscut saw; 1 wagon jack; 2 long handle hay forks 
3 manure forks; 1 corn scoop; 1 set IgaJggy^pijLwork harness; 
lot of odd size collars; 1 set doubletrees ana 7 singletrees, odd 
singletrees. 



i 



,'U 



LIVE STOCK-One team dapple gray WD*k horses; 4 young 



k 



Jersey cows, 3 ^rillfreshen by March 20; 2 heifers; 1 male hog. 

HOUSEHOLp.rFoRNITURE— 1 good piano; 1 living room 
suite; one 8-ft. round dining table; 1 solid oak center table; 3 
rockers; lots of straight chairs; 2 metal bedsteads and springs; 
3 feather beds; 1 settee; 2 chest of drawers; 1 wash stand; one 
12x12 Axministet rag; three 12x12 good congeloum rugs; ;one 
17x14 red velveiirui? one 9x12 Axminister rug; new coal heeler; 
1 Estate heatrola; 2 card tables; 1 lard press; 1 sausage null; 2 
milk pails; all kinds of dishes and some cooling utensils and 
miscellaneous articles too numerous to mei " 



TERMS OF SALE— CASH 



Si 



COL. 



J. OGDEN, OWNER 

LUTE BRADFORD, AUCTIOKEEi* 



■SSM 



■Been 



y 



■«.. 









CART at, 



IMS 



THE BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 



WHEEL ALIGNMENT 

is important during winter. 
FREE CHECKING 

R. Michels Welding Co. 

722 Washington St ■ Covington, Ky. 



^miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii!; 



PEOPLES LIBERTY BANK & TRUST CO. 



<i 






COVINGTON, KENTUCKY 



Deposits Insured. Under the Federal 



\ | 

Deposit Insurance Corporation .... | 



OUTSTANDING VALUES! 

Nationally advertised Ladies', Big Girls', 
Men's, Big Boys' 



'HiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiimiiiimiiiimiMiiiimmimHiiiiii iimmtimiire 



SHOES 

OPA ODD LOT RELEASE SALE 

RATION FREE 

FEB. 19 TO MARCH 3 INCLUSIVE 

25% OFF OUR PRICE 

OPA now permits selling these shoes Ration Free 



INCOME TAX SERVICE 

Many taxpayers ask "Why snould I bother about tax re- 
turns, since my employer withholds my tax from my Salary or 
wages?" The government may owe you a tax refund. 



There are three methods of -determining which tax form 
is most economical for you to use. Don't guess which form suits 
you, consult one who knows. Reasonable fee. 

R. V. LENTS 

NO. 1 LLOYD AVE. FLORENCE, KY. 

Office Hours 6 to 9 p. m. Phone Florence 118 



You get more for your money 
when you buy "Star Brand," 
'Toll Parrot," and "Endicott 
Johnson" shoes. We sell bet- 
ter shoes at reasonable prices. 
See our shoes before buying 
elsewhere. Compare quality 
and price. 

MORRIS DEPT. STORE 

"The Boose of Quality "—Your Money's Worth or Money Back 

ERLANGER, -:- KENTUCKY 



WELDING! 

ACETYLENE and ELECTRIC 

PORTABLE 



Have Your Welding Done At Home 
Prompt Service — Reliable Work 

No job too large or too small 

R. B. TAYLOR 

PHONE FLOR. 1493-J - DIXIE 7454-M 
FLORENCE, -:- KENTUCKY 



Having sold our farm, we will sell at Auction to 

the highest bidder at our farm, located 
-■ ■■ '■ 4 miles north of Hebron on -7— 



North Bend Road 

mm 

10:00 A. M. [CWTJ 



LIVE STOCK — 3 young Jersey milch cows, giv- 
ing 3 gallons each per day; 1 Jersey heifer fresh 
March 20 ; 2 Jersey heifers, with calves 6 months 
oid; i Hereford bull weigh 700 lbs:; 23 ewes with 
19 lambs, remainder will probably lamb by day 
of sale; 1 Southdown buck; 2 nice red gilts, to 
farrow April 15; 1 Hampshire boar, 400 lbs., good 
one; one 8-year-old dapple gray horse, 1550 lbs.; 
1 gray mare 12 years old, 1300 lbs., extra good 
workers. 

FEED— About 100 bushels yellow corn; 2 or 3 
tons loose timothy; some Korean hay; 50 shocks 
fodder; stack mixed hay. 

IF ARM TOOLS — 1 good road wagon; 1 hay 
frame; 1 hay rake; 1 McCormick mower; one 10- 
disc harrow; one 50-tooth smoothing harrow; 1 
one-horse corn drill, fertilizer attachment; one 
No. 12 Vulcan and one No. 20 Oliver plow; left- 
hand turning plows; one 3-shovel cultivator; 1 
laying off plow; 1 Oliver riding cultivator; 1- 
horse sled; 1 corn shelter; hand tobacco setter; 
2000 tobacco sticks; hog killing outfit, box; 1 



large and 1 small iron kettle, tresel and board; 
sausage mill; two 10 and two 5-gallon milk cans; 
1 double washing vat; strainer buckets; 5 rolls 
brick siding; 1 RE A electric brooder, same as 
new, 400 capacity; water fountains; feeders; 4 
dozen White Rock pullets, laying; 1 pair beam 
scales, 500 lb.; new seed sower; 50 ft., 3 widths 
tobacco canvas; 2 hay ropes, 100 ft. 7-8-in. 83 ft. 

1 in. rope; 1 hay fork; 1 fence stretcher; 1 cross- 
Y cut saw; small amount lumber; six end posts, 10 

ft. long; 2 hog crates; 2 sets work harness, col- 
lars, bridles, check lines; 1 saddle; hoes, shovels, 
forks, pulleys, log chains, post hole digger and 
small tools too numerous to mention. 
HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS— 1 Estate heat- 
rola, second size; 1 Eureka coal or wood range; 1 
oil stove; 2 rockers; 4 stool chairs; 1 Brunswick 
Victrola and records; stone jars; wash bowl and 
pitcher; coal oil lamps; 3 congoleum rugs; bed 
springs; 11.6x12 Axminister rug; 1 feather bed; 

2 pillows; number of other articles. 
LUNCH WILL BE SERVED ON GROUNDS 



: 



TERMS-CASH 



S. H. & ROZLEE 

COL WORTHINGTON, Auctioneer 



k 



CONSTANCE 

Mr. and Mtsk Fred Vdhlsing call- 
ed on Miss NelKHempfling, who Is 
ill. 

Mr. and Mrs. Zel Vahlsing, of 
Bromley and Mrs. Louis spent one 
evening last week with Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred Vahlsing, Sr. 

Two more names will be added 
to the Constance Christian Church 
Service Board, that of Miss Elaine 
A. Bryant who joined the Medical 
Branch of the WACS and that of 

Henry Peeno and children mov- 
ed last week from Constance to 
their new home below Hebron, 
her sister Miss Mildred M. Bryant, 
who Joined the WAVES. Good luck 
girls. 



Ptaci&a 



ti-.M # **r " 



OMmce 



Is what we have to ot/tt 
you if you intrust youi 
eyes to our care., for they 
are the only eyes you will 
evet have. 



DR.J.O.TYSON 

OFFICC AT 

MOTCH 

THG JCWCLCRS 

613 15 MADISON HV, COVINGTON 

SINCC IBS7 



LARGE SUPPLY OF 

HORSES, MARES 
MULES 

Constantly On Hand To 
Select From 




All Stock Guaranteed 
Same Location Since 1910 



CARDOS! 



NEW LOCATION 

2 Miles South of Florence 

Opposite Spanish Villa 

Telephone Flor. 386 



XHZNZHIHl 




The leader since 1940. 

For use over wallpaper, 
calcimine or most any inside 
I surface. An oil base. 




MARCH 15th— 

The Last Day For Filing Tour 

1944 INCOME TAX 
RETURN 

Avoid The Last Minute Rush 

For prompt and effective 
compliance with the New Tax 
Law, consult — 

ISRAEL ARON 

Accountant and Auditor 

32 E. 7tth St. Covington, Ky. 
HI. 2718 



mar-Lii Beauty Shoppe 

271 Dixie Highway 
-— r FLORENCE, KY. 

Phone Florence 125 
TRY OUR SPECIAL 

cream permanent. Enriching 
oil foundation. Give your 
hair shining luster. We also 
specialise in Helene Curtis 
cold waves, cool and comfort- 
able. Natural looking curls. 
Open evening by appointment 






LINOLEUM 

CHOICE OF 50 PATTERNS 
KITCHEN and LIVING ROOM RUGS 



Covington Awning 



& Roofing 



3RD AND SCOTT 



COVINGTON, KY. 



Baby Chicks 

Hatched from flocks that have been culled and 
blood tested and all reactors removed. 



WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS 
WHITE WtANDOTTES 
ENGLISH WHITE LEGHORNS 



per 
100 



1 week old chicks $13.00 per $100 

2 weeks old chicks ! $16.00 per 100 

CUSTOM HATCHING: Hen eggs 2'/2 cents per 
egg; Turkey and duck eggs 4 cents per egg. 

DEARBORN and UBIKO POULTRY FEED 

Brooder Stoves, Chick Feeders and Fountains 
and other poultry equipment. 

DR. SALSBURY'S POULTRY REMEDIES 

CONNER'S HATCHERY 

Telephone Hebron 113 HEBRON, KY. 



Buy Your Hardware Early! 
IT IS SCARCE ... 



i 

Jamesway 500-Chick fclec. Hovers $39.95 

Oakes 300-Chick Elec. Hovers 29.95 

Jamesway 500-Chick Oil Brooders 25.00 

All size chick feeders and fountains 

Flock Feeders, on legs 4.75 

Flock Heated Waterers on stand 8.50' 

Electric Units to build brooders 6.95 

Electric Water Heaters for Fountains........ 3.95 

Water Fountains for Barrels 2.95 

Dr. Hess Poultry and Stock Tonic 

PTZ Capsules and Powder for Worms 

Hog Lye for Feeding Purpose 

5 and 10-Gallon Milk Cans 

Single Wire Stretchers ..;.... ; 2.50 

Seed Sowers (Cyclone) 2.75 

Plenty of saws, axes, grub hoes, mattocks, picks 

iron wedges, posthole diggers and 

handles of all kinds. 



Large Selection of Harness 



PLANT BED FERTILIZER BY THE BAG 

NITRATE OF SODA BY THE POUND OR BAG 

OLIVER AND VULCAN CHILLED PLOWS 

Most all repairs for both 

GARDEN PLOWS - 3-SHOVEL CULTIVATORS 

SLED SOLES and BAR IRON 

GALVANIZED WATER PIPE and FITTINGS 
ELECTRIC WIRING MATERIAL " 
ELECTRIC FENCE CHARGERS 

WIRE FENCE and BARB WIRE 
Linoleum Rugs and Linoleum by Yard 
y 30-Gallon Range Boilers 

Coal Water Heaters 

Grate Baskets 20" and 24" 

Electric Tool Grinders 

Large assortment of belts, pulleys and grinding 

wheels. 

CONRAD HARDWARE 

WALTON, KY. 



PHONE 23 



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wmmmammmm 



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-* 



THE BOONE COUNT* RECORDER, BPEUWOTOW, KENTUCKY 



McYILLE 



Mrs. Less Ryle spent the week 
with her daughter and family, of 
Norwood, Ohio. 

Several from here attended the 



Mr. and Mrs. Solon E. Ryle and 
Mr. and Mrs. Luther Surface were 
calling on Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 



Bhinkle, Saturday night. 

Mr. and MM. Charles Rice, of 
Norwood, Ohio, were calling on Mr. 




IET US EXAMINE YOUR tYES THE MODERN WAY 



LJMETZCER 

OPTOMETRIST — OPTICIAN 
631 Madison Ave., Covington, K: 



and Mrs. Leslie Shinkle, Friday 

evening. 

Valentine Party, Tuesday night at 

the Burlington school. 

Harold- Hodges was calling on 
Dorothy Delph Saturday evening. 

Wm. Delph spent 'the past week 
with his sister, Mrs. Hazel Braden 
and mother of Aurora, Indiana. 

Nellie Purdy spent Wednesday 
night with Sissie Presser. 

Mrs. Mary Tandy spent Thurs- 
day afternoon with Mrs. Alice 
Ayior. * — '■ — — : ^ 

Mrs. Neiiie Kyle *ad Mrs. SIssav 
Batchelor were callers in Belleview 
on Friday. 




"""** '' ' 



■jutK n, vm 



i 



W. 1. TAIT, 0. D. 

OPTOMETRIST 



Specializing in the 
correction and 
protection of ' 
EYESIGHT 



G 



A YET 

THEATRE 




ERLANGER, ELSMERE, KY 



FREE PARKING LOT 

TONIGHT -r FRIDAY 

FEBRUARY 22ND AND 23RD 



RYLE & HAMBRICK 

PHONE 78 PHONE 762 

BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY 

PROVICO FEED and CONCENTRATES 

16% Dairy Feed *... • $2.85 

18% Dairy Feed, Sweet 2.95 

24% Dairy Feed, Sweet 3.20 

32% Dairy Supplement / 3.25 

Big V Laying Mash. 3.40 

40% Hog Supplement 3.75 

Hog Ration 3.30 

Pig and Sow Rations 3.35 

55% Meat Scrap • 4.35 

41% Soybean Meal 3.05 

Ground Wheat 2.90 

Wheat Middlings 2.75 

Wheat Bran 2.65 

Corn Feed Meal .<^N 2.85 

Hominy Meal :..': * 2.85 

Poultry Scratch 3.20 

24,% Brewery Grain 2.45 

Horse and Mule Feed, Sweet 3.30 

100 Lb. Ohio River Salt 1.25 

Block Salt .65 

100 Lb. Oyster Shells 1.25 

No. 1 Red Clover Hay 



% 27j;. 7th St. 

VSVINGTON, KY. 

(Hours 9:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment 
Phone HE. 2088 




Bill Ab Radicffl of Burlington It 
spending the week with his grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Cason. 

Gladys Xongleton spent Thurs- 



% night with Margie Phllson. 
e Phllson fsssdly was shopping 
In Covington, Wednesday. 
Margie Phllson spent Friday 



night with Gladys 

Mn.Wra.KnK 
Covington, Friday. 



UBLIC 



' 






I WILL OFFER AT PUBLIC AUCTION ON THE LUTE 
AYLOR FARM, LOCATED 1% MILES FROM FLORENCE, ON 
ROUTE 42, 



Selected Short Subjects 
FEATURE STARTS 7:12 ang 9:17 

SATURDAY 

FEBRUARY 24TH 



DUTCH STANDARD 

4-Hr. Enamel, 18 colors. White for 

furniture, woodwork #\g< : 

floors & walls. $1.25 val.^J^ qt. 



PRESIDENT 

Quick-Dry Enamel; 
Closing out at . . . • • 



$4 .98 

A gal. 



Aluminum Paint 



$4*% .95 
Heat resisting. $495 val. <9 gal. 

GORDON SUPPLY CO. 

736 MADISON COVINGTON 

Also Location Pat's China Store 





LANG'S CAFETERIA 

623-625 Madison Ave. 

COVINGTON 

B